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Contact: imeha@imeha.org

International Model Equine Hobbyists Association
1984 -
Color Guidelines

IMEHA Rulebook | Guidelines |Show Arena |Guidebook |Contact
Please be patient, this page contains many photos! Click on sample photo to see larger version. Hover over or click on photo to see full photo credit. If you would like to search for a specific color press ctl+F if using a PC or command+F if using a Mac.
Contributing Artists and Owners for our model horse samples: Rio Rondo - Carol Williams, Beau Cheveaux Creations - Chris Flint, Michelle Belisle-Locke, Mindy Berg, Caroline Boydston, Randi Brazil, Amanda Brock, Ardith Carlton, Faye Cohen, Nicki Collins, Esther Goodrich - Puffer, Gudrun Schmitt, Jennifer Floyd, Yvonne Stevens, Barbara Daily, Amanda Dionne, Kathy Dodson, Manuela Entrekin, Suzanne Feld, Jessica Fry, Gina Hall, Alissa Harris, Debbi LerMond, Erin Logan, Beverly Lynch, Steph Michel, Donna Miller - Shannon, Sharon Mossy, Kay Myers, Cindy Nakagawa, Sabine Nusch, Marie Phillips, Sarah Rose, Juanita Snyder, Sue Sudekum, Corky Visminas, Dara West, and Mindy Winchester.
Color Shade/Common Names Dilution/Modifier on Base Color Gene Code Color Description Model Horse Samples Real Horse Samples
Base Colors
Base Colors comprise of Bay, Brown, Black and Chestnut. All colors start as one of these four base colors which are changed by dilutions, modifiers and mutations.
Bay Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa The coat ranges from light red toned brown to dark red/dark brown that looks almost black. The legs, mane and tail are always black.
Black Bay, Seal Bay, Mahogany Bay, Dark Bay Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa This is the darkest shade of bay. Coat is a dark red/dark red toned brown that is almost black. The mane, tail and legs are black. Often gets confused with brown/seal brown.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Blood Bay Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa This is the second darkest shade of bay. The coat is dark red similar to dried blood. The mane, tail and legs are black.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Steph Michel.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Brown Bay Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata The coat color is brown with a slight red hue. The mane, tail and legs are black. Lighter shades of this color often gets confused with buckskin.
Credit:
Steph Michel.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Burgundy Bay Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa The coat is a dark red with an almost purplish (burgundy) cast. The mane, tail and legs are black.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Steph Michel.

Credit:
Cambridge Stud.

Credit:
www.free-desktop-backgrounds.net.
Copper Bay Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa The coat color is a bright orange/red toned brown. The mane, tail and legs are black.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.

Credit:
xxtgxxstock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
xxtgxxstock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Light Bay, Gold Bay, Sandy Bay, Honey Bay Bay EE-Ee/A+A+-A+a This is the lightest shade of bay. The coat is a golden toned reddish brown. The mane, tail and legs are black. Not to be confused with Buckskin which will not have the red tint to the coat.
Credit: Esther Goodrich - Puffer


Credit:
equus-kinsky.com.

Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
fillyrox.deviantart.com.
Mealy Bay Pangare on Any Shade of Bay Any Shade Of Bay/Pa The coat is red toned with black legs, mane and tail. The hair around the eyes, muzzle and flanks are lighter tan/red (like a mule) due to the Pangare modifier.
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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Red Bay, Cherry Bay, Standard Bay, Bright Bay Bay EE-Ee/AA The coat color is a bright , clear shade of red hued brown. The mane, tail and legs are black.
Credit:
by Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
University of Miami.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
freeallimages.com.
Sooty Bay Sooty on Any Shade of Bay Any Shade Of Bay/Sty Any shade of bay can be affected by the sooty gene. Sooty causes the coat color to darken and may cause dappling. Because it darkens the coat, many sooty bays are mistaken for black bays/seal bays or brown/seal brown.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.


Credit:
Caroline Boydston.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
showhorsegallery.com.

Credit:
tekesale.com.
Wild Bay Wild Bay EE-Ee/A+A+-A+a The coat can range from a red that is almost black to bright red to a golden toned red. The mane, tail and legs are black. The black on the legs of a Wild Bay is restricted to the lower part legs in varying degrees and sometimes as little as a ring around the coronet.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Black Black EE-Ee The coat, legs, mane and tail are black.
Dominant Black, Light Black Black EDED-EDEd  or EDeD-Eded Most horses with this gene have tested as true black without any other modifiers or dilutions (other than possibly agouti) yet do not look black and do not show black points if the agouti gene is present. Most horses with this gene tend to be an even, dark brown or brown-black over its whole body without any dark points. They can be a very deep, true non fading black though it isn't common. Horses with the more common lighter variation of this color many times change to black after a few years which makes it confusing for breeders to identify the horse's true color. This gene tends to override the agouti gene (the gene that restricts black to the mane, tail and lower legs) so even if the horse carries the genes to be bay it will still be visually black or the lighter brown-black. Because of this, a seemingly true black horse would potentially be able to produce bay offspring when mated with an actual true black horse. This rare color has been found in the Arabian (Serr Ebony Star has been shown to have this gene based on test breedings with various other breeds and colors) and Appaloosa breeds. It may be present in other breeds but it is very rare and can be easily misidentified.
Credit:


Credit:
Lesli Kathman - Equine Tapestry.

Credit:
new-dilutions.com.
Fading Black, Summer Black, Red-Tinted Black Black EE-Ee A true black that fades from the sun and weather and may have a reddish or “worn” look to it. The most notable areas of fading occur in the mane, back, flanks and head area.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Jet Black, Non Fading Black Black EE-Ee A true black horse that has a black coat, mane, tail, and legs. The hair around the eyes, muzzle and in the flanks are also black. The color does not become sunburned or fade from effects of sun and weather.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.


Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
wall.alphacoders.com.
Raven Black, Blue-Tinted Black Black EE-Ee A true black horse that has a black coat, mane, tail, and legs. The hair around the eyes, muzzle and in the flanks are also black. The color does not become sunburned or fade from effects of sun and weather. In some lights the coat looks like it has a blue sheen.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
horsegossip.proboards.com.

Credit:
horses-of-the-dawn.wikia.com.

Credit:
equined.tumblr.com.
Brown Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata This is a separate color from black and there is a genetic test available. The coat is dark brown to black. You can tell brown from black by the hair around the eyes, muzzle and flanks being a shade of red/brown or tan. The mane and tail are black but the legs are the same color as the body, a shade darker or near black.
Credit:
Amanda Brock.


Credit:
Gudrun Schmitt.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Seal Brown Pangare on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa This is a separate color from black and there is a genetic test available. The coat is dark brown to black. The hair around the eyes, muzzle and flanks may be light tan/red (like a mule). The mane and tail are black but the legs are the same color as the body, a shade darker or near black.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
breyerhorses.com.

Credit:
beginnersguidetothequine.tumblr.com.
Chestnut Chestnut ee The coat ranges from almost black (liver chestnut) to red-toned gold (light chestnut and blond sorrel). The mane, tail and legs can be a shade darker, same color as or a shade lighter than the body color or flaxen but not black.
Black Chestnut, Liver Chestnut Chestnut ee/aa The coat is dark red toned brown to almost black. The legs are normally the same color as body but may be a shade darker or lighter. The mane and tail may be the same color as or a darker shade of the body color but not black. Sometimes the mane and tail are so dark as to appear black but usually has a red tint to it in different light. Mane and tail may also be flaxen, partially flaxen colored or some shade of dark red.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Blond Sorrel (Draft) Pangare on Chestnut ee/A+A+-A+a  or ee/A+A+-A+a/Pa The coat is a red tinted gold. The legs are normally the same color as body or a shade lighter. The mane and tail may be the same color as the body, a lighter shade of the body or flaxen but not black. Often seen with some extent of Pangare (lighter coloration on the muzzle and soft parts of body). Not to be confused with palomino, which will not have the red tint to the coat.
Credit:Esther Goodrich - Puffer


Credit:
salsolastock.deviantart.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Dark Red Chestnut Chestnut ee/AA-Aa The coat is a dark, clear, red tone. The legs are normally the same color as body but may be a shade darker or lighter. The mane and tail can be a shade darker, same color as or a shade lighter than the body color or flaxen but not black.
Credit:Kay Myers


Credit:Kay Myers


Credit:Kay Myers


Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Flaxen Chestnut, Chestnut Ruano Flaxen on Chestnut Any Shade Of Chestnut/ff Any shade of chestnut can be flaxen. The coat ranges from almost black (liver chestnut) to red-toned gold (light chestnut and blond sorrel). The mane and tail are flaxen (grayish tinted white, creamy blond to white). Lighter coat tones should not to be confused with palomino, which will have a yellow tint to the coat instead of red.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
myhorseforum.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Red Chestnut, Chestnut Alazan Chestnut ee/AA-Aa The coat is bright red toned. The legs are normally the same color as body but may be a shade darker or lighter. The mane and tail can be a shade darker, same color as or a shade lighter than the body color or flaxen but not black.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
myhorseforum.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Red Sorrel (Draft) Chestnut ee/AA-Aa  or ee/AA-Aa/Pa The coat ranges from a dark red to liver chestnut. The legs are normally the same color as body or a shade lighter. The mane and tail may be the same color as the body, a lighter shade of the body, commonly flaxen but not black. May be seen with some extent of Pangare (lighter coloration on the muzzle and soft parts of body).
Credit: Mindy Winchester


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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Sooty Chestnut/Sorrel Sooty on Chestnut or Sooty on Sorrel Any Shade Of Chestnut/Sty or Any Shade Of Sorrel/Sty Any shade of chestnut or sorrel can be affected by the sooty gene. Sooty causes the coat color to darken and many times causes dappling. Because it darkens the coat, many sooty chestnuts/sorrels are mistaken for black chestnuts/liver chestnuts.
Credit:


Credit:
tawnyhorse.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
pinterest.com.
Sorrel, Golden Chestnut, Light Chestnut, Yellow Chestnut Chestnut ee/A+A+-A+a The coat is a red tinted gold. The legs are normally the same color as body or a shade lighter. The mane and tail may be the same color as the body, a lighter shade of the body or flaxen but not black. The flaxen expression is not to be confused with palomino, which will not have the red tint to the coat.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations and Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.


Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Standard Chestnut, Copper Chestnut, Orange Chestnut Chestnut ee/AtAt-Ata The coat is a bright, clear, orange/red tone. The legs are normally the same color as body but may be a shade darker or lighter. The mane and tail can be a shade darker, same color as or a shade lighter than the body color or flaxen but not black.
Credit:
Steph Michel.

Credit:
desktopnexus.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
xxtgxxstock.deviantart.com.
Modified Base
Grey Grey on Any Color GG-Gg Grey removes the pigment from the base color, other modifiers and dilution genes that make up the original color of the horse. Grey has the unique ability to mask everything including any Pinto or Appaloosa patterns. No color is safe when Grey is present, as all horses that carry the Greying gene will end up a shade of grey or white.
Bloody Shoulder Grey, Blood Spotted Grey Grey on Any Color Any Color/GG-Gg This marking is usually caused by a large concentration of flea-bite marks on a graying horse. The most common areas where they are found are on the shoulders and/or neck but may be found elsewhere on the horse. This marking is most common in the Arabian breed but can be found in any breed that has the grey gene.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Ardith Carlton.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.
Burgundy Rose Grey Grey on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/GG-Gg The coat retains a slightly lighter shade of the bay based color with or without dappling as it greys giving it a burgundy/red wine coloration. The mane, tail and legs may retain color longer than body so they tend to stay a shade or two darker than the body as they grey.
Credit:


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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
fillyrox.deviantart.com.

Credit:
fillyrox.deviantart.com.
Dappled Grey Grey on Any Color Any Color/GG-Gg Any shade of grey with 30% to 80% of dappling over the body.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Dark Grey Grey on Any Dark Pointed Color Any Dark Pointed Color/GG-Gg The coat ranges from medium to very dark grey with or without dappling. The mane, tail and legs range from medium grey to almost black. The legs may retain color longer than body so they tend to stay a shade or two darker than the body as they grey.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
fillyrox.deviantart.com.
Dark Rose Grey Grey on Any Dark Red Color Any Dark Red Color/GG-Gg The coat retains a slightly lighter shade of the base color with or without dappling as it greys, many times giving it a dark reddish/pink coloration. The mane, tail and legs usually retain color longer so they tend to stay darker than the body as they grey.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
fillyrox.deviantart.com.
Flea-Bitten Grey Grey on Any Color Any Color/GG-Gg The coat is light grey with small flecks of the horse's true color (chestnut, black, palomino, etc.) scattered throughout. The color of mane, tail and legs depend upon the base color of the horse and the stage of graying it is at.
Credit:
Nicki Collins.

Credit:
Shana Bobbitt.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
Matt Bobbitt.
Light Grey Grey on Any Color Any Color/GG-Gg The coat is light grey, almost white with a light grey/white mane and tail.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Steph Michel.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Light Rose Grey Grey on Any Light Red Color Any Light Red Color/GG-Gg The coat retains a light shade of the base color with or without dappling as it greys giving it a reddish/pink coloration. The mane, tail and leg color are usually greyed out to close to the same shade as the body or lighter.
Credit:
Jennifer Floyd.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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fillyrox.deviantart.com.

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fillyrox.deviantart.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Medium Grey Grey on Any Color Any Color/GG-Gg The coat retains a lightened shade of the base color between dark grey and light grey, with or without dappling. The mane, tail and leg color may be lighter than their original color as they start to grey.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Steph Michel.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Mulberry Grey Grey on Chestnut ee/GG-Gg The coat is white/almost white with red shading on the knees/legs. The mane and tail are a dark red often with lighter almost white tips. This coloration is found most often in the Andalusian breed.
Credit:
Yvonne Stevens.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.

Credit:
pinterest.com.
Steel Grey, Iron Grey Grey on Black EE-Ee/GG-Gg The coat is solid dark grey without dappling, sometimes with a bluish tint. The mane, tail and legs are black. This color is sometimes confused with roan if the head is greying at a slower rate.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Dilute Colors - Single
(no combination of multiple dilute genes)
Dilution genes do not *block* red or black from showing itself, but changes it to make it lighter ... or "diluted", like adding cream to coffee.
Champagne
Champagne ChCh-Chch Champagne dilutes red to a golden color, and black to a brown or taupe color. The skin is pink with abundant dark freckles except when under pure white markings. The mane, tail and points will also be diluted (not black or chestnut). The eye color is also affected and can be different shades of light amber to shades of green.
Amber Champagne Champagne on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/ChCh-Chch The coat is a gold toned brown usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane, tail and legs are brown with the legs being a lighter shade. The eyes are amber. This color is often mistaken for buckskin or dun but can be told apart by the skin color (buckskin/dun usually has black skin).
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Alissa Harris.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Classic Champagne Champagne on Black EE-Ee/ChCh-Chch The coat is a lilac or taupe shaded tan usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane, tail and legs are a darker shade of the body color. The eyes are amber. This color is often mistaken for grulla and lilac dun but can be told apart by the skin color (dun usually has black skin)and lack of dun factor markings.
Credit:


Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Gold Champagne Champagne on Chestnut ee/ChCh-Chch The coat is yellow/gold toned from almost white to a deep gold usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane and tail are flaxen or a lighter shade of the body. The eyes are amber. This color is often mistaken for palomino but can be told apart by the skin color (palomino has black skin).
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Steph Michel.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.
Sable Champagne Champagne on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/ChCh-Chch or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/ChCh-Chch The coat is a gold toned brown (between amber and classic shades) usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane, tail and legs are brown. The eyes are amber. This color is often mistaken for buckskin or dun but can be told apart by the skin color (buckskin/dun usually has black skin).
Credit:
Manuela Entrekin.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.
Cream
Cream CcrCcr-CcrC Cream causes the base coat color to be lightened or diluted. Red colors are lightened to tan or yellow which causes bay to become buckskin and chestnut to become palomino.
Buckskin Single Cream on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC The coat ranges from almost white/tan to almost black. The mane, tail and legs are usually black though sometimes they may be a dark chocolate color.
Buckskin Single Cream on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC The coat is the tan color of a deer or a gold coin. The mane, tail and legs are usually black though sometimes they may be a dark chocolate color.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
horsebreakers.com.
Buttermilk Buckskin Single Cream on Light Bay EE-Ee/A+A+-A+a/CcrC The coat is almost white. The mane, tail and legs are usually black though sometimes they may be a dark chocolate color.
Credit:
Beverly Lynch.

Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
horsebreakers.com.
Dark Buckskin Single Cream on Black Bay or  Blood Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC The coat is a dark tan. The mane, tail and legs are usually black though sometimes they may be a dark chocolate color.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
horsebreakers.com.
Golden Buckskin Single Cream on Red Bay EE-Ee/AA/CcrC The coat is the tan color of a gold coin. The mane, tail and legs are usually black though sometimes they may be a dark chocolate color.
Credit:


Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
blog.classic-equine.com.

Credit:
tophorse.com.au.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Light Buckskin Single Cream on Light Bay EE-Ee/A+A+-A+a/CcrC The coat is a light tan. The mane, tail and legs are usually black though sometimes they may be a dark chocolate color.
Credit:
Esther Goodrich - Puffer.

Credit:
http://www.suggestkeyword.com.

Credit:
brannanquarterhorses.com.

Credit:
horsebreakers.com.
Sooty Buckskin Single Cream and Sooty on Any Bay Any Bay/CcrC/Sty The coat is a very dark tan to almost black, many times heavily dappled. The mane, tail and legs are usually black though sometimes they may be a dark chocolate color. Sometimes confused with Grullo.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.
Wild Buckskin Single Cream on Wild Bay EE-Ee/A+A+-A+a/CcrC The coat color can be almost white/tan to almost black. The mane, tail and legs are black or dark chocolate brown. The black or brown on the legs of a Wild Buckskin is restricted to the lowest part legs in varying degrees and sometimes as little as a ring around the coronet.
Credit:


Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
brannanquarterhorses.com.
Cremello Double Cream on Chestnut ee/CcrCcr The coat color is an almost white to a light gold shaded cream. The mane and tail are same color as the body or a shade lighter. They will ALWAYS have pink skin and blue eyes. 
Credit:
Sue Sudekum.

Credit:
ceara.deviantart.com.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Palomino Single Cream on Chestnut ee/CcrC The coat is yellow toned ranging from Isabella (almost white) to gold to a dark sootty palomino that is almost black. The mane and tail are light colored with at LEAST 85% of the hair being white. The eyes are brown or amber. Not to be confused with flaxen chestnut which will have a red tint to the coat instead of yellow.
Chocolate Palomino, Caramel Palomino Single Cream on Liver Chestnut ee/aa/CcrC The darkest shade of Palomino, the coat is a dark caramel/chocolate color. The mane and tail are light colored with at LEAST 85% of the hair being white. The eyes are brown or amber.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Yvonne Stevens.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
pixabay.com.

Credit:
theequinest.com.

Credit:
ryouhill.weebly.com.
Golden Palomino Single Cream on Red Chestnut ee/AA-Aa/CcrC This is the ideal coat color for palomino. The coat should be between three shades lighter or three shades darker than the color of a United States gold coin. The mane and tail are light colored with at LEAST 85% of the hair being white. The eyes are brown or amber.
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Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Isabella Single Cream on Light/Golden Chestnut ee/A+A+-A+a/CcrC The lightest shade of palomino, the coat is almost white. The mane and tail are light colored with at LEAST 85% of the hair being white. The eyes are brown or amber.
Credit:
Kay Myers.

Credit:
bigskyfarm.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
pixabay.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Light Palomino Single Cream on Light/Golden Chestnut ee/A+A+-A+a/CcrC The coat is a pale gold but not as pale as Isabella. The mane and tail are light colored with at LEAST 85% of the hair being white. The eyes are brown or amber.
Credit:


Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
pinterest.com.
Palomino Single Cream on Copper Chestnut ee/AtAt-Ata/CcrC This is the most common shade of palomino. The coat is a medium yellow toned gold lighter than a golden palomino but not as light as light palomino. The mane and tail are light colored with at LEAST 85% of the hair being white. The eyes are brown or amber.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.

Credit:
jettstock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Sooty Palomino, Smutty Palomino Single Cream and Sooty on Chestnut Any Shade Of Chestnut/CcrC/Sty The sooty/smutty modifier darkens the coat giving it a “dirty” look and often causes heavy dappling. The mane and tail are light colored with at LEAST 85% of the hair being white (May look "dirty" but is still lighter than body color). The eyes are brown or amber.
Credit:
Randi Brazil.

Credit:
Erin Logan.

Credit:
windfieldmorganfarm.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Perlino Double Cream on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrCcr The coat color is an almost white to a somewhat red or coffee shaded cream. The mane, tail and legs are a darker shade of the body color. They will normally have pink skin and blue eyes.
Credit:
Amanda Dionne.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Smoky Black Single Cream on Black EE-Ee/CcrC The coat is either black or a few shades lighter than true black. When the lighter variation is seen, they are commonly mistaken for bay, brown, liver chestnut or faded black
Credit:


Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
sommerranch.com.

Credit:
theequinest.com.
Smoky Cream Double Cream on Black EE-Ee/CcrCcr The coat color is an almost white, a light somewhat red/orange shaded cream or a light coffee colored cream. The mane, tail and legs are a darker shade of the body color. They will normally have pink skin and blue eyes.
Credit:


Credit:
horse-genetics.com.

Credit:
horseforum.com.

Credit:
www.spottedfawnpaints.
Smoky Brown Single Cream on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/CcrC or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/CcrC The coat will look like a normal brown horse except the hair around the eyes, muzzle and flanks will be golden or tan. The mane, tail and legs are a darker shade of the body color. They will normally have pink skin and blue eyes. The lighter shades may resemble a buckskin with black along the topline.
Credit:


Credit:
myhorseforum.com.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.
Smoky Brown Cream, Brown Cream Double Cream on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/CcrCcr or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/CcrCcr The coat color is an almost white, a light somewhat red/orange shaded cream or a light coffee colored cream. The hair around the eyes, muzzle and flanks may be a shade lighter than the body color or more yellow tinted. The mane, tail and legs are a darker shade of the body color. They will normally have pink skin and blue eyes.
Credit:


Credit:

Dun
Dun DD-Dd Dun is one of the dilution genes that affects both black and red pigment. Unlike Silver or Cream, it has the ability to change the physical appearance of all Black, Bay or Chestnut based horses to some degree. The coat ranges from almost white/tan to almost black. The mane, tail and legs are usually a darker shade of the body color. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present. Sometimes the primitive markings can be so light as to be almost invisible or blend in to the dark part of the legs so much they can't be seen easily.    
Bay Dun, Dun, Common Dun, Zebra Dun, Standard Dun Dun on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/DD-Dd The coat color can range from light to deep tan with a reddish tint. The mane, tail and points are black or dark brown. Dun can be told apart from buckskin by the presence of primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc)
Credit:
Suzanne Feld.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
worldclasschampagnes.webs.com.
Brown Dun, Mouse Dun Dun on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/DD-Dd or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/DD-Dd The coat color can range from light to deep tan without a reddish tint. The mane, tail and points are more of a dark brown than black. Dun can be told apart from buckskin by the presence of primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc)
Credit:
Barbara Daily.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
tawnyhorse.com.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
seaspiritoftheforest.co.uk.
Chestnut Dun, Red Dun Dun on Chestnut ee/DD-Dd The coat is red toned. The mane, tail and legs a darker shade of the body color. The head will often be darker like a roan horse. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
dungenes.org.

Credit:
theequinest.com.
Coyote Dun Dun and Sooty on Bay or Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/DD-Dd or EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/DD-Dd or EE-Ee/AA-Aa/DD-Dd/Sty The topline of the horse is a dark brown or almost black while the underline is lighter (similar to the pattern of a coyote's coat). The mane, tail and points are black or dark brown. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:

Black Dun, Grulla/Grullo, Blue Grulla/Grullo Dun on Black EE-Ee/DD-Dd The coat color typically has a bluish grey tone though some may have a brown tint similar to a dove grulla. The mane, tail and points are black. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:


Credit:
shiningchorses.com.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
blueroans4u.com.
Light Slate Grulla/Grullo Dun on Black EE-Ee/DD-Dd The coat is a light, creamy silver/light silvery brown color. The mane, tail and points are blue-black or a dark brown. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:
Suzanne Feld.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
shiningchorses.com.

Credit:
shiningchorses.com.

Credit:
shiningchorses.com.
Lobo Dun, Wolf Dun Dun on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/DD-Dd or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/DD-Dd This is a darker shade of brown dun. The coat color is a dark brown/dark tan without a reddish tint. The mane, tail and points are more of a dark brown than black. Dun can be told apart from buckskin by the presence of primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc)
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
spottedfawnpaints.com


Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
fairwind.net.
Slate Grulla/Grullo Dun on Black EE-Ee/DD-Dd The coat is a slate blue or brown to dark brown color. The mane, tail and points are black or a dark brown. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.

Credit:
shiningchorses.com.

Credit:
shiningchorses.com.

Credit:
shiningchorses.com.
Wild Dun Dun on Wild Bay EE-Ee/A+A+-A+a/DD-Dd The coat color can range from light to deep tan. The mane, tail and points are black or dark brown. Dun can be told apart from buckskin by the presence of primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc). The black or brown on the legs of a wild dun is restricted to the lower part legs in varying degrees and sometimes as little as a ring around the coronet.
Credit:
Beverly Lynch.

Credit:
tawnyhorse.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Mushroom
Mushroom Mushroom on Chestnut ee/mumu Mushroom is a recessive dilution that affects chestnut. The coat is usually a flat beige or sepia color with little to no dappling. The mane and tail are usually a lighter shade of the body to almost white. This color is often mistaken for silver dapple (which does not affect chestnut) but the horse will test negative for the silver gene and its eyelashes will usually be darker than a silver dapple's. At this time the mushroom gene has only been documented in Shetland Ponies, Haflingers and possibly American Quarter Horses and Icelandic Horses.
Credit:


Credit:
shadyacres.dk.

Credit:
kellas-stud.co.uk.

Credit:
kellas-stud.co.uk.
Pearl
Pearl prlprl-Prlprl Pearl is an incomplete recessive, cream-activated dilution gene that is sometimes confused with cream or champagne. One copy with no cream gene (Prlprl/CC) shows no effect to the base color. Two copies with no cream gene (prlprl/CC) lightens the coat, mane and tail similar to champagne and lightens the skin. One copy with a cream gene (Prlprl/CcrC) produces a pseudo-double cream including pale skin and blue/green eyes.  
Bay Pearl Pearl on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/prlprl The coat is a gold toned brown usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is light colored often with pink spotting. The mane, tail and legs are brown with the legs being a lighter shade. The eyes are amber. This color is often mistaken for amber champagne.
Credit:


Credit:
new-dilutions.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Black Pearl Pearl on Black EE-Ee/prlprl The coat is a lilac shaded tan usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is light colored often with pink spotting. The mane, tail and legs are a darker shade of the body color. The eyes are amber. This color is often mistaken for classic champagne.
Credit:


Credit:
mustangs4us.com.

Credit:
jenny-mino.blogspot.com.

Credit:
pegasus.hr.
Brown Pearl Pearl on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/prlprl or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/prlprl The coat is a gold toned brown (between amber and classic shades) usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is light colored often with pink spotting. The mane, tail and legs are brown. The eyes are amber. This color is often mistaken for sable champagne.
Credit:


Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
jenny-mino.blogspot.com.
Chestnut Pearl, Apricot Pearl on Chestnut ee/prlprl The coat is yellow/gold toned from almost white to a deep gold usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is light colored often with pink spotting. The mane and tail are flaxen or a lighter shade of the body. The eyes are amber. This color is often mistaken for gold champagne.
Credit:


Credit:
new-dilutions.com.

Credit:
new-dilutions.com.

Credit:
jenny-mino.blogspot.com.
Silver
Silver ZZ-Zz Silver only affects black and has no effect on red. Black is changed to a silvery grey coloration up to an almost black chocolate brown. Any red in the coat is unchanged.    
Bay Silver, Red Silver, Red Chocolate Silver on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/ZZ-Zz Silver does not physically affect red pigment so the coat will keep the normal bay colored body. The legs range from a light sooty color to a dark slate color. The mane and tail will range from almost white to a darker, slate color. This color is sometimes confused with chestnut/sorrel but can be distinquished by the silvery grey hairs interspersed in the points showing that black pigment was diluted.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Lesli Kathman - Equine Tapestry.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.
Black Silver, Chocolate Silver on Black EE-Ee/ZZ-Zz This is the darkest shade of black silver. The coat is a dark chocolate brown which is almost black. The mane and tail can range from a dirty slate color to a silvery white. Some black silver horses may have darker points but they will have lighter hairs mixed in with the darker ones which will separate them from a black pointed horse.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
www.breyerhorses.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Light Chocolate, Blue Silver Silver on Black EE-Ee/ZZ-Zz This is the lightest shade of black silver. The coat color is a silvery grey and the mane and tail can range from a dirty slate color to a silvery white. Some black silver horses may have darker points but they will have lighter hairs mixed in with the darker ones which will separate them from a black pointed horse.
Credit:


Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
donkeysandminiatures.weebly.com.

Credit:
donkeysandminiatures.weebly.com.

Credit:
donkeysandminiatures.weebly.com.
Brown Silver Silver on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/ZZ-Zz or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/ZZ-Zz Silver brown horses will be similar to silver bay but darker with more brown or gray coloration on the body. Some of the darkest may look black silver but have reddish noses and flanks.
Credit:


Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

Credit:
safyresporthorses.com.

Credit:
safyresporthorses.com.

Credit:
safyresporthorses.com.

Credit:
safyresporthorses.com.
Medium Chocolate Silver on Black EE-Ee/ZZ-Zz This is the midrange color of black silver. The coat is a light to medium milk chocolate color with little to no dappling. The mane and tail can range from a dirty slate color to a silvery white. Some black silver horses may have darker points but they will have lighter hairs mixed in with the darker ones which will separate them from a black pointed horse.
Credit:
Marie Phillips.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
marcumvalleyrockies.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Silver Dapple Silver on Any Color Any Color/ZZ-Zz This name is used for any heavily dappled silver horse. Dappling can be found on all color variations of silver. The coat color ranges from a heavily dappled silvery grey to a heavily dappled chocolate brown which ranges from a light chocolate to almost black. The mane and tail can range from a dirty slate color to a silvery white. Some silver dapple horses may have darker points but they will have lighter hairs mixed in with the darker ones which will separate them from a black pointed horse.
Credit:
Sharon Mossy.

Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Dilute Colors - Combinations
Amber Cream Champagne Champagne and Single Cream on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC/ChCh-Chch The coat color is an almost white to a darker somewhat gold shaded light cream usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane, tail and legs are a darker shade of the body color with some brown coloration in the tail and lowest part of the legs. The mane may also be frosted The eyes are amber or green.
Credit:


Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Double Cream Champagne Champagne on Any Double Cream Color Any Double Cream Color/ChCh-Chch The horse will look practically white, with very pale pink skin and hardly any freckles. It must have a cream champagne parent and a cream parent. It will always throw a cream gene and should produce cream champagnes as well.
Credit:


Credit:
doubletjrt.com.

Credit:
whitehorseproductions.com.

Credit:
fromstarttofoundation.com.
Buckskin Dun, Dunskin Dun and Single Cream on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC/DD-Dd The coat ranges from almost white/tan to almost black. The mane, tail and legs are usually black though sometimes they may be a dark chocolate color. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:
Beverly Lynch.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
shiningchorses.com.

Credit:
balius.crequinesites.com.
Buttermilk Dun Dun and Single Cream on Light Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC/DD-Dd The coat is a pale cream. The mane, tail and points are black. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:
Sue Sudekum.

Credit:
brannanquarterhorses.com.

Credit:
www.spottedfawnpaints.
Perlino Dun Dun and Double Cream on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrCcr/DD-Dd The coat is a pale cream to almost white. The mane, tail and legs are a darker shade of the body color. They will normally have pink skin and blue eyes. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present though may be hard to see.
Credit:


Credit:
dungenes.org.

Credit:
dungenes.org.
Buckskin Pearl Pearl and Single Cream on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC/Prlprl The coat color is an almost white to a darker somewhat gold shaded light cream usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is light colored often with pink spotting. The mane, tail and legs are a darker shade of the body color with some brown coloration in the tail and lowest part of the legs. The mane may also be frosted. The eyes are amber, blue or green. This color is often confused with amber cream champagne.
Credit:


Credit:
gypsyhorsetoday.com.

Credit:
sommerranch.com.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.
Silver Buckskin Silver and Single Cream on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC/ZZ-Zz Silver does not physically affect red pigment so the coat will keep the normal buckskin colored body or lighten it slightly. The mane, tail and legs are brown, not black. This color is sometimes confused with amber champagne but can be distinquished by the skin color.
Credit: Esther Goodrich - Puffer


Credit:
equinemasterpiece.blogspot.com.

Credit:
whitehorseproductions.com.
Classic Cream Champagne Champagne and Single Cream on Black EE-Ee/CcrC/ChCh-Chch The coat color is a somewhat lilac shaded light cream or tan usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane, tail and legs are a light brown. The eyes are amber or green.
Credit:


Credit:
schaferranch.com.

Credit:
whitehorseproductions.com.
Light Smoky Black Dun, Light Smoky Grulla/Grullo, Silvery Grulla/Grullo Dun and Single Cream on Black EE-Ee/CcrC/DD-Dd The coat is a light, creamy silver/light silvery brown color. The mane, tail and points are blue-black or a dark brown. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:


Credit:
platinumquarterhorses.com.

Credit:
horsegroomingsupplies.com.

Credit:
highpointfarmandtack.com.

Credit:
shiningchorses.com.
Smoky Black Dun, Smoky Grulla/Grullo, Dark Grulla/Grullo Dun and Single Cream on Black EE-Ee/CcrC/DD-Dd The coat is a creamy silvery brown to dark brown color. The mane, tail and points are blue-black or a dark brown. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:


Credit:
risingmoonranch.com.

Credit:
highpointfarmandtack.com.

Credit:
lastgoroundfoundationhorses.com.
Smoky Cream Dun Dun and Double Cream on Black EE-Ee/CcrCcr/DD-Dd The coat color is an almost white, a light somewhat red/orange shaded cream or a light coffee colored cream. The mane, tail and legs may be a slightly darker shade of the body color. They will normally have pink skin and blue eyes. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present though may be hard to see.
Credit:


Credit:
horsebreakers.com.

Credit:
platinumquarterhorses.com.
Smoky Black Pearl Pearl and Single Cream on Black EE-Ee/CcrC/Prlprl The coat color is a somewhat lilac shaded light cream or tan usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is light colored often with pink spotting. The mane, tail and legs are a light brown. The eyes are amber, blue or green. This color is often confused with classic cream champagne.
Credit:


Credit:
dropsofcolor.weebly.com.

Credit:
mustangs4us.com.
Sable Cream Champagne Champagne and Single Cream on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/CcrC/ChCh-Chch or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/CcrC/ChCh-Chch The coat color is a somewhat gold shaded light cream or tan usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane, tail and legs are a light brown. The eyes are amber or green.
Credit:


Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

Credit:
risingmoonranch.com.

Credit:
whitehorseproductions.com.
Smoky Brown Dun, Olive Grulla/Grullo Dun and Single Cream on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/CcrC or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/CcrC/DD-Dd The coat is brown toned with an olive cast. The mane, tail and points are more of a dark brown than black. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
lewisranch.com.
Smoky Brown Pearl Pearl and Single Cream on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/CcrC/Prlprl or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/CcrC/Prlprl The coat color is a somewhat gold shaded light cream or tan usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is light colored often with pink spotting. The mane, tail and legs are a light brown. The eyes are amber, blue or green. This color is often confused with sable cream champagne.
Credit:


Credit:

Gold Cream Champagne Champagne and Single Cream on Chestnut ee/CcrC/ChCh-Chch The coat is white or yellowish white usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane, tail and legs are the same color as the body. The eyes are amber or green.
Credit:
Ardith Carlton.

Credit:
whitehorseproductions.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Palomino Dun, Dunalino, Yellow Dun Dun and Single Cream on Chestnut ee/CcrC/DD-Dd The coat is yellow toned ranging from cremello (almost white) to gold to a dark smutty palomino that is almost black. The mane and tail are light colored with at LEAST 80% of the hair being white. Has dun-factor primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) though they may be so light that they may be very hard to see.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
lastgoroundfoundationhorses.com.

Credit:
shiningchorses.com.

Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
pinterest.com.
Cremello Dun Dun and Double Cream on Chestnut ee/CcrCcr/DD-Dd The coat color is an almost white to a darker somewhat gold shaded cream. The mane and tail are same color as body or a shade lighter. They will ALWAYS have pink skin and blue eyes. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present though may be hard to see.
Credit:


Credit:
dungenes.org.

Credit:
platinumquarterhorses.com.
Palomino Pearl Pearl and Single Cream on Chestnut ee/CcrC/Prlprl The coat white or yellowish white usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is light colored often with pink spotting. The mane, tail and legs are the same color as the body. The eyes are amber, blue or green. This color is often confused with gold cream champagne.
Credit:


Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

Credit:
new-dilutions.com.
Amber Champagne Dun Champagne and Dun on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/ChCh-Chch/DD-Dd The coat is a gold toned brown usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane, tail and legs are brown with the legs being a lighter shade. The eyes are amber. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present though they may be difficult to see.
Credit:


Credit:
dungenes.org.

Credit:
platinumquarterhorses.com.
Classic Champagne Dun, Lilac Dun Champagne and Dun on Black EE-Ee/ChCh-Chch/DD-Dd The coat is a light shaded tan usually with a metallic sheen that in rare instances may have a lilac hue. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane, tail and legs are a darker shade of the body color. The eyes are amber. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present though they may be difficult to see.
Credit:


Credit:
risingmoonranch.com.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.
Dove Grulla/Grullo, Sable Champagne Dun Champagne and Dun on Brown EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/ChCh-Chch/DD-Dd or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/ChCh-Chch/DD-Dd The coat is a dove grey or brown color. The mane, tail and points are more of a dark brown than black. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present though they may be difficult to see.
Credit:


Credit:
worldclasschampagnes.webs.com.

Credit:
pinterest.com.
Gold Champagne Dun Champagne and Dun on Chestnut ee/ChCh-Chch/DD-Dd The coat is yellow/gold toned from almost white to a deep gold usually with a metallic sheen. The skin is a mauve/pumpkin freckled color. The mane and tail are flaxen or a lighter shade of the body. The eyes are amber. This color is often mistaken for palomino but can be told apart by the skin color (palomino has black skin). There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present though they may be difficult to see.
Credit:


Credit:
platinumquarterhorses.com.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.
Apricot Dun, Peach Dun, Claybank Dun, Chestnut Pearl Dun Pearl and Dun on Chestnut ee/prlprl/DD-Dd The coat is peach/apricot toned red. The mane, tail and legs a darker shade of the body color. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
pinterest.com.
Silver Black Dun, Silver Grulla/Grullo Silver and Dun on Black EE-Ee/ZZ-Zz/DD-Dd The coat is lightened to a light chocolate brown to almost white. Some silver black dun horses may have darker points but they will have lighter hairs mixed in with the darker ones which will separate them from a black pointed horse. The mane and tail can range from a dirty slate color to a silvery white. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present though they may be hard to distinguish.
Credit:


Credit:
shiningchorses.com.

Credit:
venomxbaby.deviantart.com.
Other Solid Colors
Norwegian Fjord Dun All Fjord horses are dun and some extent of pangare (lighter coloration on the muzzle and soft parts of body) is common. The breed standard recognises five shade variations. These shades have been officially recognized in Norway since 1922. White markings are discouraged, though a small star is acceptable  
Credit:
myhorseforum.com.
Brown Dun, Bay Dun, Brunblakk Dun on Bay  or Dun and Pangare on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/DD-Dd or  EE-Ee/AA-Aa/Pa/DD-Dd The body color is a pale yellow-brown, and can vary from cream to almost a light chestnut. Some extent of Pangare (lighter coloration on the muzzle and soft parts of body) is common. The primitive markings, as well as the midtstol and halefjær, are black or dark brown. The remainder of the mane and tail is usually cream or white, though may be a darker on darker individuals.
Credit:


Credit:
www.breyerhorses.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Grey Dun, Black Dun, Grå Dun on Black  or Dun and Pangare on Black EE-Ee/DD-Dd  or EE-Ee/Pa/DD-Dd The "grey dun" (grå) has a gray body; the shade can vary from light silver to dark slate gray. Some extent of Pangare (lighter coloration on the muzzle and soft parts of body) is common. The midtstol, halefjær and primitive markings are dark gray or black . The remainder of the mane, tail and forelock are a lighter grey than the body color, and can be very pale. Though the term used in the breed standard for this color is "grey", it is actually a form of dun and not a true genetic gray. The term "gray" and even "gray dun" are misnomers, as the Fjord horse gene pool does not carry the graying gene. The term used for this color in other breeds and by geneticists is black dun.
Credit: Owned by Dawn Marie Calo


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www.silverdrache.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Red Dun, Chestnut Dun, Rødblakk Dun on Chestnut  or Dun and Pangare on Chestnut ee/DD-Dd  or ee/Pa/DD-Dd The body is a pale golden. Some extent of Pangare (lighter coloration on the muzzle and soft parts of body) is common. Midtstol, halefjær and primitive markings are red or red-brownish, always darker than the color of the body, but never black. The rest of the mane and tail is usually cream, though on some individuals the entire mane and tail may be white.
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Credit:
www.deepcreekfarm.com.

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fhotd64476.yuku.com.
Kvit, Cremello Dun, Perlino Dun, Smoky Cream Dun Double Cream and Dun on any color or  Double Cream, Dun and Pangare on any color Any Color/CcrCcr/DD or  Any Color/CcrCcr/Pa/DD Coat color is a light cream and will have faint or indistinguishable primitive markings. The eyes are blue and the skin is pink. Kvit was traditionally considered undesirable, and thus is a very rare color in the breed due to intentional selection against it. Nonetheless, the nature of cream genetics statistically will result in the occasional kvit horse any time two horses that both carry a single copy of the cream dilution are mated, such as an ulsblakk and/or a gulblakk.
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Credit:
atomicstables.blogspot.com.

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pinterest.com.
White Dun, Buckskin Dun, Uls Dun, Ulsblakk Single Cream and Dun on Bay or  Single Cream, Dun and Pangare on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC/DD-Dd or  EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC/Pa/DD-Dd The body is a near-white color. Some extent of Pangare (lighter coloration on the muzzle and soft parts of body) is common. The midtstol, halefjær and primitive markings are black or grey. The rest of the mane and tail are lighter than the body color.
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Credit:
www.deepcreekfarm.com.

Credit:
pinterest.com.
Yellow Dun, Palomino Dun, Gulblakk Single Cream and Dun on Chestnut or  Single Cream, Dun and Pangare on Chestnut ee/CcrC/DD-Dd  or ee/CcrC/Pa/DD-Dd The rarest color of Fjord horse. The color of the body is yellowish-white. Some extent of Pangare (lighter coloration on the muzzle and soft parts of body) is common. Midtstol, dorsal stripe and halefjaer are darker yellowish than the color of the body. Forelock, mane and tail can be completely white, and on such individuals the dorsal stripe can be indistinct.
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fhotd64476.yuku.com.

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fhotd64476.yuku.com.
Long Ears/Exotic Solid Colors Mule, donkey and exotic equine color differs from horses. Please check out the links after each color group for more knowledgeable information regarding these colors.
  African Wild Ass https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_wild_ass   or http://www.waza.org/en/zoo/visit-the-zoo/oddtoed-ungulates/horses/equus-africanus
Credit:
Nicki Collins.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
  Donkey Solid Color http://colorgenetics.info/equine/donkey-color-genetics-0   or http://www.lovelongears.com/faq_color.html
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Mindy Winchester.

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Sue Sudekum.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
  Khur, Indian Wild Ass, Baluchi Wild Ass https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_wild_ass
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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.
  Kiang, Tibetan Wild Ass https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiang   or http://www.waza.org/en/zoo/select-a-region/asia/mammals/oddtoed-ungulates-perissodactyla/horses-and-relatives/equus-kiang
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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.
  Mongolian Wild Ass, Khulan https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mongolian_wild_ass
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commons.wikimedia.org.
  Mule Solid Color http://www.lovelongears.com/about_mules.html
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Carol Herden.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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flickr.com.

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pixabay.com.
  Nubian Wild Ass https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nubian_wild_ass
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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.
  Onager, Persian Wild Ass, Asian Wild Ass https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onager   or https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian_onager
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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.
  Przewalski's Wild Horse, Mongolian Wild Horse, Asian Wild Horse, Mongolian Tarpan, Tahki, Tahk Dun and Pangare on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/Pa/DD-Dd The coat color can range from light to deep tan with a reddish tint to an almost red bay. Some extent of Pangare (lighter coloration on the muzzle and soft parts of body) is almost always seen. The mane, tail and points are black or dark brown. There will always be primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) present though may be hard to see.
Credit:
Nicki Collins.

Credit:
CollectA.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.
  Somali Wild Ass https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somali_wild_ass   or http://www.waza.org/en/zoo/visit-the-zoo/oddtoed-ungulates/horses/equus-africanus
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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.
  Syrian Wild Ass https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syrian_wild_ass
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commons.wikimedia.org.
  Turkmenian Kulan, Transcaspian Wild Ass https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkmenian_kulan
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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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Juanita Snyder.
Patterned Colors
All patterns of white are literally superimposed over the colored parts of the horse and do not affect genetic make-up of the base color of the coat (just changes the physical appearance). The genes that control the colored parts and the genes that control the white pattern are not related and act individually of each other. These white patterns are separated into two groups. One consists of individual white hairs mixed in with the solid colored hairs and is associated with the Roaning patterns. The other is made up of groups of white hairs that make up patches or spots on the solid color and are most commonly associated with Appaloosa and Pinto patterns. In the case of the patterns that consist of patches, this superimposed white has the ability to disguise certain identifying traits of some genes, such as the black points on a Bay or the dorsal stripe of a Dun.
Appaloosa
Appaloosa Appaloosa spotting is dependant upon the Leopard Complex gene which is needed for the pattern to be visible and various pattern-helping modifiers which determine the amount of white. At this time PATN1, a modifier with the largest pattern causing effect, has been the only pattern modifier confirmed and is now testable. There is NOT a PATN2 blanket modifier! Research by The Appaloosa Project supports that patterns are caused by multiple small effect modifiers and that the amount of white visible is determined by the number of modifiers inherited. It has also been found that horses heterozygeous for the Leopard Complex gene (Lplp) tend to have spotting in the blanket/white field while horses homozygeous (LPLP) tend to have few to no spots.
Blanket Appaloosa Single Leopard and Pattern1 on any color Any Color/Lplp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 White covers the hips and croup with spots in the white area. The edges of the white area may be crisp or roaned.
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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fillyrox.deviantart.com.

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fillyrox.deviantart.com.
Extended Blanket Appaloosa Single Leopard and Pattern1 on any color Any Color/Lplp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 White covers the hips, croup and extends over the back sometimes to the shoulders with spots in the white area. The edges of the white area may be crisp or roaned.
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Few Spot Appaloosa, No Spot Appaloosa Double Leopard and Pattern1 on any color Any Color/LpLp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 This is the maximum expression of the Appaloosa coloring. The horse is mostly white with a few spots found mostly on the head, neck, elbows or flank areas. Other Appaloosa traits are still seen such as the mottled skin, eye sclera, etc.
Credit:
Steph Michel.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Frost Appaloosa Double Leopard and Pattern1 on any color Any Color/LpLp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 White hairs scattered on the topline of the horse looks as if someone had sprinkled snow or frost on it. It can be as little as a dusting along the back bone of the horse to going as far as the elbows and hips.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
horse-genetics.com.

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theequinest.com.
Lacey Blanket Appaloosa Double Leopard and Pattern1 on any color Any Color/LpLp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 A solid white blanket that is very lacey around the edges and is often quite small.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
crittercreek.com.

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crittercreek.com.

Credit:
stallionsonline.co.uk.
Leopard Appaloosa Single Leopard and Pattern1 on any color Any Color/Lplp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 The coat is white with colored spots over the entire body. The color of the spots are determined by the base color of the horse (example bay, chestnut, buckskin, etc)
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Kathy Dodson.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Minimal Blanket Appaloosa Single Leopard and Pattern1 on any color Any Color/Lplp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 A very small white blanket that is located well on the top of the horse's rump.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
shoestringstable.files.wordpress.com.

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Lesli Kathman - Equine Tapestry.

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crittercreek.com.
Semi-Leopard Appaloosa Single Leopard and Pattern1 on any color Any Color/Lplp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 The body is white with colored spots with the head, neck and legs retaining the base color of the horse.
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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fillyrox.deviantart.com.

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fillyrox.deviantart.com.
Snowcap Appaloosa Double Leopard and Pattern1 on any color Any Color/LpLp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 White covers the hips and croup, sometimes extending over the back up to the shoulders and around the belly. There are NO spots in the white area. The edges of the white area may be crisp or roaned.
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Dara West.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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theequinest.com.

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pinterest.com.
Snowflake Appaloosa Single Leopard and Pattern1 on any color Any Color/Lplp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 This pattern consists of white spots instead of colored spots distributed randomly over the coat. 
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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theequinest.com.

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pinterest.com.

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bhranch.com.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Varnish Roan Appaloosa Leopard on any color Any Color/LpLp-Lplp Horses with this coloration are born a “normal” solid color and get lighter as they age. The original coloration of the horse is retained over the prominent bony parts such as the hips, withers, shoulders, legs, facial bones, etc. This lightening of the coat is NOT the same as the Greying gene! Also, it is different from the classic Roan coloration and can be told apart from it by looking at the face. A classic Roan will have a solid colored head while a Varnish Roan only has color on the bony parts of the face such as the ridge of the nose, cheek bones, etc.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Pinto
Pinto  
Frame Overo Single Frame Overo on any color Any Color/Frfr This horizontally oriented pattern spreads from the belly and progresses upwards towards the back. It normally looks like it has a “frame” of color surrounding the white and the white will rarely ever cross the topline. Even the most maximally expressed frame overo will retain color along the topline, ears and lower legs unless another white spotting gene such as sabino is present. The head is usually extensively marked (bald face, apron face, bonnet face). Many times a horse will have a rectangular “mustache” along the upper lip. Blue eyes are common (even without being surrounded by white). All legs are usually solid colored though frame overos with "normal" leg markings are periodically seen . The homozygous form of this gene is lethal (Overo Lethal White Syndrome).
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo and Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Maximum/Extreme Frame Overo White Single Frame Overo on any color Any Color/Frfr At it's most maximum expression frame overo (with no other white pattern genes involved) will cause the horse to be almost totally white. The only color may be found on the horse is the head around the ears and if any other color remains on the body it's usually as small spots of color, roan or speckled on areas such as the tail base and along the topline, these areas may not have colored hair, it may just be the colored skin showing through the white hair.
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palmlodgepaints.com.

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pinterest.com.

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ltdmini.com.
Minimal Frame Overo Single Frame Overo on any color Any Color/Frfr A minimal overo will have less than 30% white on the body. The most minimal expression may only manifest as a bald face and no body spots
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Steph Michel.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Sabino/Sabino1 SBSB-SBsb  or SB1SB1-SB1sb1 The sabino pattern is described as irregular spotting usually on the legs, belly and face, often with extensive roaning. This pattern appears in breeds that DO NOT have pinto coloration in their gene pool (example: Arabians and Clydesdales). The sabino gene is not to be confused with the roaning gene or rabicano gene. They are completely different genes that can sometimes occur together but are not necessarily indicative of the sabino gene. A sabino mutation has recently been discovered that produces one type of sabino pattern. It has been named Sabino1 as it is not present in all sabino-patterned horses. Sabino1 is found mostly in Tennessee Walking Horses, American Miniature Horses, American Paint Horses, Aztecas, Missouri Foxtrotters, Shetland Ponies, Spanish Mustangs and Pony of the Americas (it is not found in Arabians and Clydesdales). More mutations will probably be identified that account for other sabino patterns.    
Sabino Sabino on any color Any Color/SBSB-SBsb Common traits of this pattern are a bald face, wide-blaze or apron blaze that extends over the muzzle and under the jaw. These may or may not have black spots on or around the muzzle and white that extends past where the bridle would lay. High white stockings that extend past mid-knee or mid-hock and terminate in a point at the front of the leg or into disconnected leg markings are also a common characteristic. Many times some form of body white, belly belly spots, girth spots etc. is found. One form of the pattern looks like a loudly marked overo with lacey markings. It is usually difficult to tell a sabino from a sabino overo and many times genetic testing needs to be done to confirm whether or not the overo gene is present. In one of the maximal forms of the pattern the body is almost totally white. Usually there are at least a few colored hairs in and around the ears. This gene can also produce the Medicine Hat pattern combined with the tobiano and overo patterns.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Nicki Collins.

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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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fillyrox.deviantart.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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rgbstock.com.
Sabino1 Sabino1 on any color Any Color/SB1SB1-SB1sb1 This sabino gene variant is not present in all sabino-patterned horses. Sabino1 is found mostly in Tennessee Walking Horses, American Miniature Horses, American Paint Horses, Aztecas, Missouri Foxtrotters, Shetland Ponies, Spanish Mustangs and Pony of the Americas (it is not found in Arabians and Clydesdales). For horses that have this gene, one copy produces horses with two or more white legs or feet, often with white running up the anterior part of the leg, an extensive blaze, spotting on the midsection, with jagged or roaned margins to the pattern. Horses with 2 copies of this gene are at least 90% white and are referred to as sabino white.
Credit:
Ardith Carlton.

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Tardis Stables - Marie Phillips.

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venomxbaby.deviantart.com.

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homecomingbook.wordpress.com.

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pinterest.com.
Splash White, Splash Splash on any color Any Color/any SW variant The color looks like it was poured on from above and dribbling down the sides of the horse. 90% of splash whites have a dark topline and white underline. The spots are always smooth with clearly defined edges like tobianos and never jagged like frame overos or sabinos. Almost all have white legs from knees and hocks down and may even have no solid color on legs at all. The top of the neck as well as the ears are almost always colored but the eyes are only rarely surrounded by color. The face markings of splashed whites are straight-edged and bottom heavy though the most minimal expression may only show a rounded star higher than normal on the forehead or a teardrop shaped snip on the muzzle. Splash is also thought to cause "normal" face markings to skew such as a blaze that swings to one side of the face instead of going straight down the nose. The eyes are normally blue or grey. Currently there are 5 variants for splash mapped. There are tests for SW1, SW2 and SW3. SW1 is believed to be non-lethal in its homozygous form while SW2 and SW3 are thought to be lethal in utero in their homozygous forms.
Credit:
Donna Miller - Shannon.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Tobiano Tobiano on any color Any Color/ToTo-Toto Tobiano is a vertically oriented spotting pattern which starts at the top of the horse and spreads downward, crossing the back anywhere between the withers and the tail. The spots are the base color of the horse and are normally smooth edged, large and rounded. The head will almost always be colored even in it's most maximum expression (unless another gene is involved such as sabino, frame overo, splash or dominant white). Normally all legs are white though rarely a tobiano with one or two dark legs has cropped up. If facial marks are present they are “normal” markings like a blaze, or star, stripe and snip.  An apron face or bald face would suggest the horse is a tovero. Most tobiano horses have a mixed colored and white mane and tail though fully colored or totally white are also commonly found.
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Buckskin Calico Tobiano Single Cream, Tobiano and Calico on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC/ToTo-Toto/CalCal-Calcal The horse exhibits a normal tobiano pattern but also has darker irregular patches of unmodified bay in the pattern (similar to a calico cat). Minimally marked horses may not be noticed but more extensively marked horses can be very distinctive. Cream, tobiano and calico must all be present and dominant for this gene to manifest. This pattern is very rare and has been found in American Paint Horses, Tennessee Walking Horses and some families of Choctaw Spanish Mustangs. Unlike cats, calico in horses is not tied to one gender or the other.
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pinterest.com.
Maximum/Extreme Tobiano White/Moroccan Tobiano Tobiano on any color Any Color/ToTo-Toto At it's most maximum expression tobiano (with no other white pattern genes involved) will cause the horse to be almost totally white. The only color on the horse is the head and if any other color remains it's usually as small spots of color, roan or speckled on areas such as the tail base, chest and flanks, these areas may not have colored hair, it may just be the colored skin showing through the white hair.
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ID 6114290 © Brian Humek | Dreamstime.com.

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pinterest.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Minimal Tobiano Tobiano on any color Any Color/ToTo-Toto This is the most minimal expression of tobiano. The horse may show as little white as four socks or stockings along with a small white patch at the withers, hips or tail dock.
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commons.wikimedia.org.

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Palomino Calico Tobiano Single Cream, Tobiano and Calico on Chestnut ee/CcrC/ToTo-Toto/CalCal-Calcal The horse exhibits a normal tobiano pattern but also has darker irregular patches of unmodified chestnut in the pattern (similar to a calico cat). Minimally marked horses may not be noticed but more extensively marked horses can be very distinctive. Cream, tobiano and calico must all be present and dominant for this gene to manifest. This pattern is very rare and has been found in American Paint Horses, Tennessee Walking Horses and some families of Choctaw Spanish Mustangs. Unlike cats, calico in horses is not tied to one gender or the other.
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pinterest.com.

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horsegroomingsupplies.com.
Combined Pinto Patterns
Tovero, Tobiano Frame Overo Tobiano and Single Frame Overo on any color or Tobiano and Single Frame Overo and any combination of Sabino, Sabino1, Splash and Dominant White on any color Any Color/ToTo-Toto/Frfr/ or  Any Color/ToTo-Toto/Frfr/(and any combination of SBSB-SBsb, SB1SB1-SB1sb1, any SW variant and any Ww variant This pattern consists of tobiano and frame overo or tobiano and frame overo along with any combination of sabino, sabino1, splash and dominant white. It ranges from extreme patterns like the medicine hat to the wild whole apron faced patterns. This pattern may also have excessive white in the mane and on all four legs. Frame overos with a tobiano-like pattern but no white over backbone are usually toveros.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Sabino Frame Overo Single Frame Overo and Sabino on any color or  Single Frame Overo and Sabino1 on any color Any Color/Frfr/SBSB-SBsb or  Any Color/Frfr/SB1SB1-SB1sb1 This pattern has solid color over the backbone from the withers to the tail bone and the underline is also solid color. All legs are normally white with the pattern spreading from belly to legs upward a frame overo does but with roaning in most cases (crisp-edged spots are sometimes seen though) and it makes many sabino frame overos and frame overos hard to tell apart, especially in the minimally spotted ones. Many sabino overos have lacy edged spots with tiny flecks of color or white near the spot edges and these can be roaned spots within larger spots. The minimal expression of this pattern can show as little as only high white stockings to the extreme of nearly all white with body flecking around flanks, backbone, chest and ears. Wild facial markings like apron, bald faces, bonnets and roaning with flecking are always found and it is nearly impossible to find one with just a star, blaze or stripe. The manes and tails are usually solid colored but occasionally you will see one with white or roaning in the mane.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Sabino Tobiano Tobiano and Sabino on any color or  Tobiano and Sabino1 on any color Any Color/ToTo-Toto/SBSB-SBsb/SB1SB1-SB1sb1 This pattern is a combination of tobiano and sabino or sabino1 patterns. Like tovero, it ranges from extreme patterns like the medicine hat to the wild whole apron faced patterns. They can also have excessive white in the mane and on all four legs. The more minimal expressions may only show a lacy edged tobiano pattern with the tell-tale pointed white leg markings. Because of the combination with sabino or sabino1 this pattern is often confused with tovero though frame overo is not part of this pattern.
Credit:
Steph Michel.

Credit:
Lesli Kathman - Equine Tapestry.

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pinterest.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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pinterest.com.
Splash Frame Overo Single Frame Overo and Splash on any color Any Color/Frfr/any SW variant The combination of frame overo and splash many times produces a mostly white horse with minimal color along the topline. Many horses with this gene combination are confused with horses having sabino or sabino combinations.
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whistlevillefarms.com.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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tawnyhorse.com.

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tawnyhorse.com.
Splash Tobiano Tobiano and Splash on any color Any Color/ToTo-Toto/any SW variant The combination of tobiano and splash many times produces a horse with a reconizable tobiano body pattern but has a mostly white face, high/extreme white legs and, many times, more white on the flank and belly than would normally be seen on a tobiano. Many horses with this gene combination are confused with horses having sabino or sabino combinations.
Credit:
Steph Michel.

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Kathy Dodson.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

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horsemanshipschool.com.

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horsemanshipschool.com.

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horsemanshipschool.com.
Dominant White White on any color Any Color/Ww The white gene is usually started in a breed by spontaneous mutation and a white foal is born by surprise. The resulting foal is typically able to pass on the gene to its offspring. There are now 21 known variants of the white gene with each showing slightly different manifiestations of the pattern. The W1, W2, W4, W6, W7 variants are most likely to cause the horse to be born completely white (see White section for examples) and it stays white it's entire life. Some dominant white horses show a variety of roaning similar to sabino and is often mistaken for sabino (for example Puchilingui and Sato. Like grey, it affects/masks all colors, dilutions and modifiers. The skin is pink and the eyes will be brown, hazel or blue. To be able to know what color offspring a dominant white horse may produce you will either need to know what color the parents were or have it tested. This gene is lethal in its homozygous form and usually the embryo never develops.
Dominant White1 Dominant White1 on any color Any Color/Ww1 W1 started in the Freiberger breed with the mare Cigale in 1957. In it's more minimal manifestations, a horse with W1 will have residual pigment along the topline (which they may then lose over time). Like grey, W1 affects/masks all colors, dilutions and modifiers. The skin is pink and the eyes will be brown, hazel or blue. This gene is lethal in its homozygous form and usually the embryo never develops.
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commons.wikimedia.org.
Dominant White3 Dominant White3 on any color Any Color/Ww3 W3 is found in Arabian horses descended from R Khasper (born in 1996) A horse with W3 will show a variety of roaning similar to sabino and is often mistaken for sabino (for example R Khasper). Like grey, W3 affects/masks all colors, dilutions and modifiers. The skin is pink and the eyes will be brown, hazel or blue. This gene is lethal in its homozygous form and usually the embryo never develops.
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Credit:
fernvalleyfarm.net.
Dominant White5 Dominant White5 on any color Any Color/Ww5 W5 is found in Thoroughbred horses descended from Puchilingui (born in 1984) A horse with W5 can be fully white or show a variety of roaning similar to sabino and is often mistaken for sabino (for example Puchilingui and Sato). Like grey, W3 affects/masks all colors, dilutions and modifiers. The skin is pink and the eyes will be brown, hazel or blue. This gene is lethal in its homozygous form and usually the embryo never develops.
Credit: Esther Goodrich - Puffer


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oakwoodfarmtb.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Dominant White10 Dominant White10 on any color Any Color/Ww10 W10 is found in Quarter Horses descended from GQ Santana (born in 2000). In it's more minimal manifestations, a horse with W10 will have sabino-like spotting. Like grey, it affects/masks all colors, dilutions and modifiers. The skin is pink and the eyes will be brown, hazel or blue. This gene is lethal in its homozygous form and usually the embryo never develops.
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Credit:
horse-genetics.com.

Credit:
stallionlocator.com.
Skjevet, Norwegian Fjord Tobiano, Norwegian Fjord Pinto Possibly Tobiano Any Color/ToTo-Toto Extremely rare (possibly extinct and possibly not able to be registered) patterning seen in Norwegian Fjords. Little is known about the exact gene/mutation that causes it though it is thought to be Tobiano. The pattern has a white oblong, diagonal stripe running from the neck, over the wither and down the shoulders. Sometimes it will connect to spots on the back and ribs.  Many times there is white on the legs.
Credit:
Gina Hall.

Credit:
Reiner Geurts.
Roan
Roan RnRn-Rnrn This type of Roaning is called "dark headed", "true" or "classic" roan and is genetically separate from the roaning that can happen with the leopard complex (Appaloosa) patterns and the roaning that can occur with the sabino and rabicano patterns. Roan can appear on any color and lightens the body while leaving the head, mane, tail and legs their original colors depending upon their colors and other modifiers. Roan is sometimes confused with dun since it lightens the coat in a similar way (dun will always have primitive markings). Dun horses can also carry the roan gene and may need to be tested to determin if roan is present.  
Bay Roan, Red Roan Roan on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/RnRn-Rnrn The body color may be a burgundy to pink tint with the head remaining a “normal” bay color and the mane, tail and legs remaining black.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Black Roan, Blue Roan Roan on Black EE-Ee/RnRn-Rnrn The body color may be a grey, blue or purple tint with the head, legs, mane and tail remaining a “normal” black chestnut sometimes with dark redish edges where the true color transitions into the lightened body color.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Buckskin Roan Single Cream and Roan on Bay EE-Ee/AA-Aa/CcrC/RnRn-Rnrn The body color ranges from a light red tinted tan to almost white. The head and upper legs range from almost white/tan to almost black. The mane, tail and lower legs are usually black though sometimes they may be a dark chocolate color.
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Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
pinterest.com.
Chestnut Roan, Strawberry Roan Roan on Chestnut ee/RnRn-Rnrn The body color may be a tan to pink tint with the head, legs, mane and tail remaining a “normal” chestnut.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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fillyrox.deviantart.com.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Corn Roan Roan on any color Any Color/RnRn-Rnrn This pattern can affect ALL colors. The head, legs, mane and tail retain the original color while the rest if the body is lighter. The lighter color on the body is caused by white hairs intermixed evenly with the base color of the horse. In addition to this, there are darker spots of the “normal” base color scattered about on the body. The darker spots were named “corn spots” due to their similarity in shape and coloring to the kernels found on Indian corn.
Credit:
Esther Goodrich Puffer.

Credit:
Beverly Lynch.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Dun Roan Roan on any Dun Any Color/DD-Dd/RnRn-Rnrn The body color may lighten even more than it will with only the dun gene and the head, mane, tail and legs will remain the “normal” dun based colors. The dun-factor primitive markings (dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, etc) will also be present.
Credit:
Kay Myers.

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lynnsquarterhorses.com.

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pinterest.com.

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worldclasschampagnes.webs.com.
Lilac Roan, Dark Chestnut Roan Roan on Black Chestnut ee/AtAt-Ata/RnRn-Rnrn The body color may be a light blue or light purple tint. The mane, tail and legs are the same color as the head, a shade darker or near black.
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Credit:
ID 14528704 © Rebecca Hermanson | Dreamstime.com.

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pinterest.com.

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pinterest.com.
Palomino Roan, Honey Roan Single Cream and Roan on Chestnut ee/CcrC/RnRn-Rnrn The body color ranges from a creamy light gold to almost white. The head and legs are yellow toned ranging from Isabella (almost white) to gold to a dark sootty palomino that is almost black. The mane and tail are light colored with at LEAST 85% of the hair being white. The eyes are brown or amber. Not to be confused with flaxen chestnut which will have a red tint to the coat instead of yellow.
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pinterest.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Purple Roan, Dark Bay Roan, Brown Roan Roan on Brown or Roan on Dark Bay EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/RnRn-Rnrn or  EE-Ee/AtAt-Ata/Pa/RnRn-Rnrn  or EE-Ee/AA-Aa/RnRn-Rnrn The body color may be a blue or purple tint. On brown the the hair around the eyes, muzzle and flanks are a shade of red/brown or tan.   When the pangare modifier is present with brown the hair around the eyes, muzzle and flanks may be lighter tan/red (like a mule). The mane and tail are black but the legs are the same color as the head, a shade darker or near black. On dark bay there will not be the lighter hairs around the eyes, muzzle and flanks and the blue/purple shade may be slightly more pronounced.
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Jillian D (JillianAnn2008).

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White
White White is not a "true" color. It is produced by either a modifier gene or by one or more pattern genes on any color base coat. A totally white maximum tobiano is relatively rare and more often shows as a medicine hat pattern. The white pinto patterned horses most likely have sabino1 or maximum tovero patterns.  
Albino Not Found In Equines Not Found In Equines The coat is pure white with PINK eyes and skin. The true Albino gene HAS NOT been found in the Equine gene pool. A white colored horse is the product of other genes (or combination of) such as grey, cream, champagne or any of the spotting pattern genes.    
Dominant White1 Dominant White1 on any color Any Color/Ww1 W1 started in the Freiberger breed with the mare Cigale in 1957. The white gene is usually started in a breed by spontaneous mutation and a white foal is born by surprise. The resulting foal is typically able to pass on the gene to its offspring. There are now 11 known  variants of the white gene with each showing slightly different manifiestations of the pattern. The W1, W2, W4, W6, W7 variants are most likely to cause the horse to be born completely white (W1 may have residual pigment along the topline, which they may then lose over time) and it stays white it's entire life.  Like grey, it affects/masks all colors, dilutions and modifiers. The skin is pink and the eyes will be brown, hazel or blue. To be able to know what color offspring a dominant white horse may produce you will either need to know what color the parents were or have it tested.  This gene is lethal in its homozygous form and usually the embryo never develops.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Dominant White10 Dominant White10 on any color Any Color/Ww10 W10 is found in Quarter Horses descended from GQ Santana (born in 2000). The white gene is usually started in a breed by spontaneous mutation and a white foal is born by surprise. The resulting foal is typically able to pass on the gene to its offspring. There are now 11 known  variants of the white gene with each showing slightly different manifiestations of the pattern. The W1, W2, W4, W6, W7 variants are most likely to cause the horse to be born completely white (W10 can also produce sabino-like spotting) and it stays white it's entire life.  Like grey, it affects/masks all colors, dilutions and modifiers. The skin is pink and the eyes will be brown, hazel or blue. To be able to know what color offspring a dominant white horse may produce you will either need to know what color the parents were or have it tested.  This gene is lethal in its homozygous form and usually the embryo never develops.
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Credit:
horse-genetics.com.

Credit:
stallionlocator.com.

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deanmyersfarms.com.
Dominant White2 Dominant White2 on any color Any Color/Ww2 W2 is found in Thoroughbred horses descended from KY Colonel (born in 1946). The white gene is usually started in a breed by spontaneous mutation and a white foal is born by surprise. The resulting foal is typically able to pass on the gene to its offspring. There are now 11 known  variants of the white gene with each showing slightly different manifiestations of the pattern. The W1, W2, W4, W6, W7 variants are most likely to cause the horse to be born completely white and it stays white it's entire life. Like grey, it affects/masks all colors, dilutions and modifiers. The skin is pink and the eyes will be brown, hazel or blue. To be able to know what color offspring a dominant white horse may produce you will either need to know what color the parents were or have it tested.  This gene is lethal in its homozygous form and usually the embryo never develops.
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commons.wikimedia.org.

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widehdwalls.com.
Dominant White4 Dominant White4 on any color Any Color/Ww4 W4 started in the Camarillo White Horse breed with Sultan in 1912. The white gene is usually started in a breed by spontaneous mutation and a white foal is born by surprise. The resulting foal is typically able to pass on the gene to its offspring. There are now 11 known  variants of the white gene with each showing slightly different manifiestations of the pattern. The W1, W2, W4, W6, W7 variants are most likely to cause the horse to be born completely white (W4 may have residual pigment along the topline, which they may then lose over time) and it stays white it's entire life.  Like grey, it affects/masks all colors, dilutions and modifiers. The skin is pink and the eyes will be brown, hazel or blue. To be able to know what color offspring a dominant white horse may produce you will either need to know what color the parents were or have it tested.  This gene is lethal in its homozygous form and usually the embryo never develops.
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Homozygous Frame Overo Frame Overo (homozygous form) on any color Any Color/FrFr The Overo pattern in its homozygous form is lethal. The foal is born almost totally white but dies within 72 hours due to Overo Lethal White Syndrome.
Maximum/Extreme Sabino White Double Sabino on any color Any Color/SBSB At it's most maximum expression sabino will cause the horse to be almost totally white, if any color remains it's usually as roan or speckled on areas such as the ears, tail base, chest and flanks, these areas may not have colored hair, it may just be the colored skin showing through the white hair. They eyes are typically dark.
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Maximum/Extreme Splash White Splash on any color Any Color/any SW variant At it's most maximum expression splash will cause the horse to be totally white with blue eyes. If any color remains it's usually as small spots of color, roan or speckled on the topline and ears.
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Maximum/Extreme Tovero White Tobiano with any combination of Frame Overo, Sabino, Sabino1, Splash  or Dominant White on any color Any Color/ToTo-Toto/(and any combination of Frfr, SBSB-SBsb, SB1SB1-SB1sb1, any SW variant and any Ww variant At it's most maximum expression tovero will cause the horse to be almost totally white, if any color remains it's usually as small spots of color, roan or speckled on areas such as the ears, tail base, chest and flanks, these areas may not have colored hair, it may just be the colored skin showing through the white hair.
Credit:
Beverly Lynch.

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shi-stock.deviantart.com.
Maximum/Frame Overo White Frame Overo (hetrozygous form) on any color Any Color/Frfr At it's most maximum expression frame overo will cause the horse to be almost totally white, if any color remains it's usually color left on areas such as the ears and tail base, these areas may not have colored hair, it may just be the colored skin showing through the white hair.
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Maximum/Tobiano White Tobiano on any color Any Color/ToTo-Toto At it's most maximum expression tobiano (with no other white pattern genes involved) will cause the horse to be almost totally white. The only color on the horse is the head and if any other color remains it's usually as small spots of color, roan or speckled on areas such as the tail base, chest and flanks, these areas may not have colored hair, it may just be the colored skin showing through the white hair.
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ID 6114290 © Brian Humek | Dreamstime.com.

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pinterest.com.
Sabino1 White Double Sabino1 on any color Any Color/SB1SB1 Sabino1 is currently the only variant of sabino that has a genetic test. It is not present in all sabino-patterned horses (sabino1 is not found in the Arabian, Thoroughbred, Standardbred, Shire and Clydesdale breeds). Horses with 2 copies of this gene are generally at least 90% white with pink skin from birth and are referred to as sabino-white. At it's most maximum expression sabino1 will cause the horse to be totally white, if any color remains it's usually as roan or speckled on areas such as the ears, tail base, chest and flanks, these areas may not have colored hair, it may just be the colored skin showing through the white hair. They typically do not have blue eyes.
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horse-genetics.com.

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shabrifoxtrotters.com.
White Grey Grey on any color Any Color/GG-Gg This term describes horses who have completed the greying process. All pigment in the hair, including that in the mane, tail and legs has been removed. Since grey affects/masks all colors , dilutions and modifiers, skin and eye color depends upon what other color modifiers or dilutions the horse has.
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Other Patterns
Brindle Brindle Possibly Chimeric or  Possibly A Variation of Roan and the Sooty modifier A very rare pattern that results in a black or dark pigment striping on any base coat, though it most commonly occurs on colors with black points. Brindle seems to reorganize the dark hairs in the sooty modifier into a vertical striping pattern. The stripes are narrow and random, similar in appearance to the stripes sometimes seen in dog breeds such as the boxer and the greyhound. It usually doesn't affect the head and legs as much as it does the body with the heaviest concentrations of brindling being on the neck, shoulders and hindquarters. It is unknown if a gene is responsible for this pattern and research is being conducted to find what causes it. At this time there are two theories, one is that the pattern is a result of chimerism the other is that the pattern is caused by the Roan gene and/or the Sooty modifier.
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Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Icelandic Horse Tobiano "Mutation" Chimeric Extremely rare pattern seen in Icelandic Horses. This pattern looks like a tobiano but expresses chestnut where white usually falls, and a darker body color where the "normal" spots would go. This pattern is not caused by a gene but is chimeric (twins fusing into a single foal in utero).
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whitehorseproductions.com.
Pintaloosa Pintaloosa Any Pinto Pattern and Any Appaloosa Pattern on any color Any Color/(any combination of ToTo-Toto, Frfr, SBSB-SBsb, SB1SB1-SB1sb1, any SW variant and any Ww variant)/(any combination of LpLp-Lplp, PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1) This pattern is a combination of any pinto pattern(s) with any Appaloosa pattern(s).
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Ardith Carlton.

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internationalpintaloosahorseregistry.yolasite.com.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Rabicano Rabicano, Skunk Tail, Coon Tail, White Ticking RBRB-RBrb A type of roaning in which the white hairs are confined to the flanks, ribs, and dock of the tail. It is particularly prominent on the flanks, often appearing to follow the pattern of growth of the hairs. Over the ribs the pattern can have a striped appearance. In some horses only the dock of the tail is affected (skunk tail) and on such horses the tail may be partly or nearly all white. It can be told apart from Sabino by the white hairs at the base of the tail.
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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Mindy Berg.

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Barbara Daily.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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Long Ears/Exotic Spotted or Striped Colors
Mule, donkey and exotic equine color differs from horses. Please check out the links after each color group for more knowledgeable information regarding these colors.
Donkey Spotted Color http://colorgenetics.info/equine/donkey-color-genetics-0   or http://www.lovelongears.com/faq_color.html
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Juanita Snyder.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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flickr.com.

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flickr.com.
Mule Spotted Color http://www.lovelongears.com/about_mules.html
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Zebra Hybrids
Zedonk, Zebrass, Zebronkey, Zebra/Donkey Cross, Zebra/Donkey Hybrid Zebra/Donkey Hybrids will have short donkey switch tails with patterns ranging from just mere leg striping to full on body brindling.
http://www.lovelongears.com/zorse.html

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.
Zorse, Zebroid, Zony, Zebrule, Zebra/Horse Cross, Zebra/Horse Hybrid Zebra/Horse Hybrids will have long narrow horse like tails with patterns ranging from minimal striping to full on body brindling.
http://www.lovelongears.com/zorse.html

Credit:
Mindy Winchester.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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Grevy's Zebra, Imperial Zebra The Grevy's zebra is the largest of the three zebra species. Its thick neck and large, round ears give it a mule-like physique. The Grevy's zebra has the thinnest, most close-set stripes, extending all the way down to their white belly. The belly and the area around the base of the tail lack stripes which is unique to the Grevy's zebra. The stripes on the neck are broader than those on the body. The stripes on the  hindquarters are vertical until just above the hind legs. The muzzle is ash-grey to black in color with the lips having whiskers.
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commons.wikimedia.org.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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rgbstock.com.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.
Plains Zebra, Common Zebra The plains zebra is the most abundant and the smallest of the three zebra species. The plains zebra subspecies have browninsh shadow stripes between the larger black stripes which is unique to them.
Credit:
Juanita Snyder.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.
Chapman's Zebra The Chapman's Zebra is a northeastern subspecies of the plains zebra. Chapman's Zebra is distinguished by stripes on the lower halves of the legs, which break up into many irregular brown spots. The pastern is not completely black on the lower half. They also have fewer shadow stripes than the Damara Zebra.
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Crawshay's Zebra The Crawshay's Zebra is an eastern subspecies of the plains zebra. The Crawshay's zebra has very narrow stripes compared to other Plains zebra subspecies and it has fewer shadow stripes than the Damara Zebra.
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commons.wikimedia.org.

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Damara Zebra, Burchell's Zebra, Zululand Zebra The Damara Zebra is a southern subspecies of the plains zebra. Damara zebras are described as being striped on the head, the neck, and the flanks, and sparsely down the upper segments of the limbs then fading to white. One or two brownish shadow stripes rest between the bold, broad stripes on the barrel and haunch.
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commons.wikimedia.org.

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rgbstock.com.

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Juanita Snyder.
Grant's Zebra The Grant's Zebra is a northern subspecies of the plains zebra and it is the smallest of the six plains zebra subspecies. They are vertically striped in front, horizontally on the back legs, and diagonally on the rump and hind flanks. Shadow stripes are absent or only poorly expressed. The stripes, as well as the inner-spaces, are broad and well defined.
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Maneless Zebra The Maneless Zebra is a northeastern subspecies of the plains zebra. The Maneless Zebra has striping similar to the Crawshay's Zebra but are not as narrow. They also have very few shadow stripes which are usually found on the haunches.
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Quagga The quagga, a plains zebra subspecies, became extinct in the late 19th century. It was distinguished from other zebras by its limited pattern of primarily brown and white stripes, mainly on the front part of the body. The rear was brown and without stripes, and therefore more horse-like (please see chart at right that shows the other markings found on true Quaggas). The Quagga Project is selectively breeding plains zebras that are phenotypically similar to the quagga in a process called breeding back to recreate a zebra with the same striping and color of the extinct quaggas. http://www.quaggaproject.org/
Credit:
Juanita Snyder.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.

Credit:
Jennifer Floyd.

Credit:
Jennifer Floyd.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.

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Juanita Snyder.
Selous Zebra The Selous Zebra is a southeastern subspecies of the plains zebra. They look similar to Damara Zebras, but the 'shadow' stripes are usually very faint and their legs are striped to the hooves.
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wild-about-you.com.
Mountain Zebra The Mountain Zebra has black or dark brown vertical stripes on the neck and torso which graduate to wider—and fewer—horizontal bars on the haunches. It has a gridiron pattern on the rump and its white underside has a dark stripe that runs the length of the belly. A Mountain Zebra also has a distinctive dewlap on the throat that looks a bit like an Adams' apple.
Credit:
Juanita Snyder.

Credit:
Juanita Snyder.
Cape Mountain Zebra The Cape Mountain Zebra is a subspecies of the Mountain Zebra that is found in South Africa. The stripes are black and closely spaced on a white background. They are broad on the upper hind legs, but narrower towards the forequarters and head. The striping continues all the way down to the hooves, but stops on the flanks, leaving the belly white.
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Hartmann's Mountain Zebra Hartmann's Mountain Zebra is a subspecies of the Mountain Zebra that is found in Southern Africa. The stripes are black or brown and closely spaced on a buff/tan background instead of white. They are broad on the upper hind legs, but narrower towards the forequarters and head. The striping continues all the way down to the hooves, but stops on the flanks, leaving the belly buff/tan.
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Modifiers - Other
Flaxen ff This modifier (or possible multiple modifiers) affects the mane and tail of Chestnut based colors, causing them to lighten to a cream color or white. It doesn't always affect the mane and tail equally so one may be lightened while the other is not.
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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xxtgxxstock.deviantart.com.
Pangare, Mealy Pa This modifier affects any color in the flanks, behind the elbows, buttocks, muzzle, around the eyes, and along the belly. These areas are lightened from a light tan to white depending upon the color of the horse.
Credit:
Sue Sudekum.

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Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

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Sooty, Smutty Sty This modifier darkens any color. It shows minimally as a darkening of the topline and across the shoulders to darkening the color so much that it totally hides the true color of the horse. In many cases the flanks, behind the elbows, buttocks, muzzle, around the eyes, along the belly and between the front/back legs will be lighter.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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Face and Leg Markings
Face Markings
 Face Markings  
Apron Face This marking looks like there is an apron tied around the horse's head. White extends down the front of the face between the eyes and widens as it goes down the face then covers the whole muzzle. The white may extend as far back as the cheekline on the sides and bottom of head but most of the cheeks and around the eyes are colored.
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.


Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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  Badger Face, Reverse Blaze Similar to a blaze except instead of white on a colored head, it is the base color of the horse on a white head.
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  Bald Face Any white marking extending laterally to encompass both eyes, overlapping both nasal bones and covering the face down to the nostrils.
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ID 114471 © Dizajune | Dreamstime.com.

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pinterest.com.

Credit:
whitehorseproductions.com.
  Blaze A blaze is a large or wide white marking which connects a star, stripe and snip. A blaze is always a combination of all three of these marks and therefore will never end above the nostrils. It extends close to the eyes, wide over the center of the face and bridge of the nose, and either extends almost the width of the nostrils or over part of all of each nostril.
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Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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  Bonnet, War Bonnet, Paperfaced The whole face/head is white with color only appearing on the ears. Seen most often with the Medicine Hat pinto pattern.
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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  Lower Lip Spot, Chin Spot Any white marking on the lower lip and/or chin.
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Nicki Collins.

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  Mustache     A black marking along side of the mouth and/or the front lip making the horse look like it is wearing a mustache.
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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commons.wikimedia.org.

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  Race A white stripe that goes off to one side instead of straight down the face.
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Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

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  Snip A snip is any white mark found below the top of the nostrils and can go down to and including the lower lip. Snips can enter into one or both nostrils, or extend to the lip.
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Beverly Lynch.

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  Star Any white marking occurring on the horse's face between the eyes but above the eye line.
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Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

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Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Star and Snip     Any white marking occurring on the horse's face between the eyes but above the eye line along with any white mark found below the top of the nostrils that can to down to and including the lower lip.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.


Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Star and Stripe Any white marking occurring on the horse's face between the eyes connecting to any marking below the eye and above the top of the nostrils but within the nasal bones.
Credit:
Cindy Williams.

Credit:
Yvonne Stevens.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Star, Stripe and Snip     Any narrow stripe connecting a star and snip starting between the eyes and going to between the nostrils or to the upper lip.
Credit:


Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Strip, Stripe Any white marking below the eye and above the top of the nostrils but within the nasal bones.
Credit:


Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Upper Lip Spot Any white marking below the nostrils but still on the upper lip.
Credit:


Credit:
pinterest.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Leg Markings
Leg Markings    
  Coronet White occurs as the first inch above the hoof and extends all around the hoof including the heel.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Ermine Spots, Distal Spots Dark spots on a white leg marking. They are often close to the hoof, especially where there is hoof striping.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Fetlock, Ankle, Low Sock A white marking that extends from the top of the hoof to the top of the ankle joint.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Half-Pastern A white marking that extends to midway between the coronet and the ankle.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Heel A white marking that may be found across the entire heel or just on one side.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Lightning Mark Usually caused by Leopard Gene LpLp-Lplp Irregular white markings on the legs that do not contact the hoof.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:

  Partial Pastern A pastern marking which is irregular and extends to the ankle joint at only one point.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Pastern White extends from the top of the hoof to the bottom of the ankle or fetlock joint.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Sock White that extends no more than half way up the cannon bone.
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
  Stocking, High Whites Any white marking extending from the hoof and covering the leg up to or above the knee or hock
Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Other/Miscellaneous Markings
Bend Or Spots, Ben d'Or Spots These are small to large spots of color that range from a couple of shades darker than the base coat to very dark, almost black and can be found in any breed. They are most commonly seen on chestnut and palomino but also occur on darker colors though they may be harder to see. These are randomly distributed on a horse and may not be present at birth, some horses may not get them until they are a few years old and some horses may not get them for several years. At this time the genetic control for the spotting is unknown.
Credit:


Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Birdcatcher Spots These are small spots of white on the body of the horse, generally the size of an eraser head to the size of a quarter and can be larger. The spots may disappear and reappear randomly from season to season. They are unrelated to the leopard complex although they can resemble the snowflake pattern when there are numerous birdcatcher spots on a horse.  Birdcatcher spotting tends to run in certain families making it quite probable that they are genetically produced but at this time that gene/modifier has not be found.

Credit:
Sabine Nusch.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Cobwebbing Caused By Dun Gene DD-Dd Cobwebbing starts under the forelock and appears as dark lines extending in varying lengths over the forehead or around the eyes.
Credit:


Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Counter Shading A marking consisting of a stripe tracking along the backbone from the mane to the tail on a NON-DUN factor colored horse. Usually this disappears or becomes less visible after the horse sheds it's foal coat. These are not "true" Duns, this is like camouflage, similar to fawns or baby lions having spots that fade as they get older. Sometimes the horse will keep the stripe along it's back but there are no other primitive markings found which will help determine that it is counter shading, not Dun factor.
Credit:


Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Dorsal Stripe Caused By Dun Gene DD-Dd A Dun factor marking consisting of a stripe tracking along the backbone from the mane to the tail. Many times it will have small prongs emanating from it out to the sides giving it a spidery look.  It is normally a darker shade of the body color or black. If a back stripe is found on other colors it is most likely to be Counter Shading.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Face Mask Caused By Dun Gene DD-Dd The top portion of the face is a darker/smutty shade than the body. It is not to be confused with a dark-headed roan.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Gulastra Plume, Silvertail Thought To Be Caused By Sabino SbSb-Sbsb The tail of the horse is lightened to a flaxen/silvery color while the mane remains unaffected. In Arabians it is called "Gulastra Plume" after the Arabian stallion who's line started showing the trait. In other breeds it is know as Silvertail. This is sometimes confused with rabicano.
Credit:


Credit:
draftswithdots.blogspot.com.au.
Ink Spots, Paw Prints Usually Caused By Double Tobiano ToTo Dark spots (1-3 inches wide) found on the white Tobiano markings. These tend to show up on homozygous individuals (two tobiano genes), but also happen on heterozygous (one tobiano gene) individuals
Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Chris Flint - Beau Cheveaux Creations.

Credit:
Yvonne Stevens.

Credit:
shi-stock.deviantart.com.

Credit:
thecolorfulchincoteague.com.

Credit:
www.spottedfawnpaints.
Lacing, White Lacing, Giraffe, Marble, Reticulated, Reticulated Leukotrichia This rare, distinctive pattern is distinguished by fine white lines formed in a reticulated pattern similar to a giraffe, spider web or "lace". It is normally found over the back of the horse between the tail and withers. It can cover the whole back but can also be restricted to only the hips, central back or withers. This pattern is thought to be hereditary since it appears to be limited to certain bloodlines in the breeds it has been documented in. It usually develops by the time the horse is a year old and the pattern does not normally change once it develops. Similar looking lacing marks have been linked to certain vaccines and to a rare skin disease called erythema multiforme.
Credit:


Credit:
millersequine.com.
Leg Bars Caused By Dun Gene DD-Dd A Dun factor marking consisting of horizontal (Zebra) striping on the upper portion of the legs. They are normally a darker shade of the body color or black.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.


Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Manchado This pattern has the white progressing from the top of the horse and works it's way down. The head, front of the neck, underbelly and legs tend to keep their color. Most horses with this pattern have large, crisp white areas with many small, round or smoothily contoured spots inside of them. Minimally spotted horses will tend to have the white and spots at the top of their neck and includes the mane touched by the white. The maximum expression of this pattern leaves the head and lower legs colored with the rest of the horse white with various sized round and contoured spots scattered thoughout. This is a rare coat pattern that has only cropped up in Argentina in a handful of horses from various breeds (Criollo, Hackney, Arab, and TB so far). It is now thought to be a recessive gene not yet mapped since it has now proven repeatablility and consistancy in the horses documented with this pattern. The pattern is NOT related to appaloosa, sabino, or chubari/Tetrarch spots though at first glance they may look similar.
Credit:
Yvonne Stevens.

Credit:
colorgenetics.info.

Credit:
whitehorseproductions.com.
Peacock Spots, Halo Spots Caused By Single Leopard and Pattern1 Lplp/PATN1PATN1-PATN1patn1 The spots on an Appaloosa that are surrounded by shading caused by the dark skin underneath the white of the blanket. The effect makes the spot look similar to the spots found on a peacock's tail.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
flickr.com.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Primitive Markings Caused By Dun Gene DD-Dd Markings associated with the Dun gene that include dorsal stripe, leg bars, cobwebbing, face mask, shoulder bar and ear striping/outline.

Credit:
Nicki Collins.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Shoulder Bars, Transverse Stripes Caused By Dun Gene DD-Dd Vertical striping that is a darker shade of the body color or black appearing on the withers.

Credit:
Carol Williams - Rio Rondo.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Tetrarch Spots, Chubari Spots Large white spots that appear occasionally on graying Thoroughbreds and Akhal-Tekes. It is unknown at this time what causes this spotting.
Credit:


Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.

Credit:
commons.wikimedia.org.
Information Links
**Note/Disclaimer: Depending upon where you live, some terms are interchangeable (example: Chestnut/Sorrel). The table above is a listing of horse colors and markings to help you identify the colors of your models. We are by no means geneticists and this is far from a complete list of colors. We have listed to the best of our ability, interpretation and knowledge the common colors/shades and their various regional names as well as which gene(s) make up those colors. The examples shown are the best we have been able to find without knowing the actual genetic makeup of the shown horses (which means a few of the examples may only be visually accurate/close if not genetically). These color definitions are for the purpose of showing in the IMEHA Color Shows. IMEHA has the written permission of use from the artists for all model horse photos used. Photos are copyrighted to the artists. Information compiled and updated by Stephanie Michel and Cynthia Jameson from available genetics publications, forums and internet sources. Rio Rondo - Carol Williams
Beau Cheveaux Creations - Chris Flint
University of California Davis - Veterinary Genetics Lab
DunGenes.org
Brindle Horses - Sharon Batteate
New Dilutions.com
International Champagne Horse Registry
Horse Colors.us
Silver Dapple Morgans Project
Donkeys & Mules vs. Horse Pinto Patterns
The Appaloosa Project
The Splashed White Project

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Opened: July 16, 2015
Updated: December 5, 2015