Photo Credit: Eventing Dressage

Champagne Supernova, shown as a Buckskin Sport Horse, is a Breyer SR Competitor owned by Mona McGraw. Comment: Horse is performing movement #12 of the USEF Preliminary Test B (E - Circle left 20m medium canter. E - working canter straight ahead.)- He is finishing the circle and continuing straight ahead.


Eventing Dressage



Eventing Dressage tests are held during a specialized competition called Eventing. Also known as Horse Trials or Three-day Eventing, the Eventing competition is an equestrian triathlon which involves three phases: Dressage, Cross-country, and Show Jumping. Entries into the IMEHA Eventing Dressage class shall depict only the Eventing Dressage test phase of the event.

The Equestrian Eventing Dressage test was designed to demonstrate that military horses are supple and obedient and suitable for use at parades and other events where the rider might expect to perform for royalty or military commanders. The rider uses the Dressage phase to demonstrate that their horse is willing and able to perform a set test.

For an event rider to keep a strong eventing horse under control requires great knowledge and understanding, although Eventing Dressage, even at the highest level, is not as demanding as pure Dressage. At the highest level of competition, the Eventing Dressage test is roughly equivalent to the USDF Third Level, and may ask for half-pass at trot, shoulder-in, travers, collected, medium and extended gaits, single flying changes, and counter-canter.

The Eventing Dressage tests may not ask for Grand Prix movements such as piaffe or passage.

As with pure Dressage, the Eventing Dressage phase is ridden in a dressage arena (20x60m or 20x40m) with dressage letters. The judges will judge an Eventing Dressage test in a similar manner as a pure dressage test that includes technical marks for the movement, impulsion, submission and riding. Competitors are awarded marks (from 0 to 10) for each movement and overall collective marks by the judges.

Entry Requirements:
A dressage arena (indoor or outdoor) and visible letter.
A description of the test and movement.

The requirements for Tack and Attire for Eventing Dressage, although similar to pure Dressage, do have some differences. See Eventing Dressage specifics for Tack and Attire below.

The most noteable difference between pure Dressage and Eventing Dressage are the Eventing Dressage Test Levels, which are:

Beginner Novice, Novice, Training, Preliminary, Intermediate, and Advanced.


LOWER LEVEL REQUIREMENTS (Beginner Novice through Preliminary):

Required Tack
An English (Huntseat) saddle or a Dressage saddle is required. A Snaffle Bridle with cavesson noseband, dropped noseband, flash noseband, or combination of flash and dropped nosebands is required

Optional:
Breastplate
Spurs

Prohibited :
Pelham bits, Double Bridles, martingales, bit guards, boots or bandages, blinkers, or other gadgets are strictly forbidden, under penalty of elimination. Shadbelly, tail coats are not permitted. Chaps and/or half chaps are not allowed.

Rider:
The dress code is a short (huntseat) riding coat of dark color or tweed with tie, choker or stock tie, white or light-colored breeches or jodhpurs, boots or jodhpur boots, a hunt cap or riding hat with a hard shell. Shadbelly, tail coats are not permitted. Gloves of conservative color and spurs are optional. A whip, no longer than 47.2 inches, may be carried (except in USEF/USEA Championships and USEA Championship divisions).


UPPER LEVEL REQUIREMENTS (Intermediate and Advanced):

Required Tack
An English (Huntseat) saddle or a Dressage saddle is required. Bridle may be plain snaffle or double bridle. A plain snaffle bridle, shall be made entirely of leather or leather like material, with either regular cavesson, a dropped noseband, a flash noseband or crossed noseband. A double bridle with cavesson noseband, i.e. bit and bridoon with curb chain (made of metal or leather), is also permitted.

Optional:
Breastplate

Prohibited :
Pelham bits, martingales, bit guards, boots or bandages, blinkers, or other gadgets are strictly forbidden, under penalty of elimination. Chaps and/or half chaps are not allowed.

Rider:
The dress code for intermediate and advanced levels is similar to that of Grand Prix Dressage. The rider must wear a dark-colored coat (usually black or navy), shirt, stock tie, and pin, white or light-colored breeches, riding boots (preferrably black) and a belt. If the rider chooses to wear a Shadbelly, tail coat, a Top Hat that is black or dark blue must also be worn. Gloves (usually white, although other colors are permitted) and spurs (may be roweled) are required. A whip, no longer than 47.2 inches, may be carried (except in USEF/USEA Championships and USEA Championship divisions).

Members of the Armed Services and police units may ride in the uniform of their service at any level. Riders choosing to wear Armed Services or police uniform must wear the appropriate military/police cap or hat for their branch of service, or protective headgear.



DRESSAGE ENTRANTS PLEASE NOTE:
The above list of Tack and Attire requirements is merely a simplified version. FOR COMPLETE RULES, DETAILS AND SPECIFICS please see the USEF EVENTING Division Rulebook or the USEA Rulebook.



TEST PORTIONS WHICH INVOLVE ENTERING, EXITING, OR HALT/ SALUTE THE JUDGE:
Are to be shown ONLY in Dressage All Others, Awards, Horse Entering, Horse Exiting Arena, etc.




Photo Credit: Eventing Dressage

Ronan shown as a Bay roan QH gelding, is an OF Peter Stone performance horse, Renegade. Shown by Robin Nere with the comment line: Preliminary Dressage test. At "C" - halt, rein back one horse length and immediately proceed in medium walk. Here, starting to rein back.


See these links for Full rules for Eventing Dressage:

USEF Eventing Division Rule Book

USEA US Eventing Association

USEF Eventing Dressage Tests

Individual Eventing Dressage Tests