International Model Equine Hobbyists Association
Rulebook 2016

Approved by the Board of Directors


LISTING FOR ALL THE RULES BY NUMBER
RULE 1. REGISTERING TO SHOW
RULE 2. NAMING THE HORSE
RULE 3. WESTERN EQUIPMENT
RULE 4. ENGLISH EQUIPMENT
RULE 5. PLEASURE DRIVING EQUIPMENT
RULE 6. ATTIRE
RULE 7. GAITS
RULE 8. BREED CONFORMATION
RULE 9. PERFORMANCE CLASSES
RULE 10. WESTERN PLEASURE ARENA
RULE 11. WESTERN PLEASURE NATURAL
RULE 12. WESTERN BAREBACK PLEASURE
RULE 13. WESTERN BAREBACK EQUITATION
RULE 14. WESTERN YOUTH CLASSES
RULE 15. WESTERN TRAIL ARENA
RULE 16. WESTERN TRAIL NATURAL WITH OBSTACLE
RULE 17. CUTTING
RULE 18. ROPING
RULE 19. TEAM PENNING or RANCH SORTING
RULE 20. WESTERN RIDING
RULE 21. REINING
RULE 22. REINED COW HORSE
RULE 23. BARREL RACING
RULE 24. POLE BENDING
RULE 25. EXTREME COWBOY RACE
RULE 26. COWBOY ACTION MOUNTED SHOOTING
RULE 27. OTHER GYMKHANA EVENTS
RULE 28. HUNTER UNDER SADDLE ARENA
RULE 29. HUNTER UNDER SADDLE NATURAL – NO RAIL
RULE 30. HUNT SEAT EQUITATION
RULE 31. HUNT SEAT BAREBACK PLEASURE
RULE 32. HUNT SEAT EQUITATION
RULE 33. ENGLISH HUNT SEAT EQUITATION YOUTH EVENTS
RULE 34. HUNT SEAT TRAIL ARENA
RULE 35. ENGLISH TRAIL NATURAL – NO RAIL FENCE
RULE 36. CROSS COUNTRY
RULE 37. ENGLISH RIDING
RULE 38. FOX HUNTING OR CUBBING
RULE 39. FIELD HUNTER TRIALS
RULE 40. HANDY HUNTER
RULE 41. HUNTER HACK
RULE 42. HUNTER OVER FENCES
RULE 43. HUNTER PACE
RULE 44. SHOW HACK
RULE 45. SHOW OR STADIUM JUMPING
RULE 46. OTHER ENGLISH EVENT
RULE 47. ENGLISH BARREL
RULE 48. ENGLISH GYMKHANA GAMES
RULE 49. DRESSAGE
RULE 50. SADDLESEAT
RULE 51. SIDESADDLE
RULE 52. COSTUME
RULE 53. HARNESS
RULE 54. MISCELLANEOUS TRAIL EVENTS
RULE 55. MISCELLANEOUS PERFORMANCE EVENTS
RULE 56. SHOWMANSHIP AND PRESENTATION
RULE 57: HEADSTUDY

RULE 1. REGISTERING TO SHOW:

A. Entrants must join by registering their Stable or Ranch Name and receive a password. Please be sure to name your stable or ranch something easy and to remember the EXACT spelling of the name. Please do not use any punctuation in the User ID (Stable Name) or in the password. The PHP Program that runs the script and shows can not process these.
Example User Name: No - Blue Moon's Ranch. Yes - Blues Moons Ranch.


B. When registering and uploading your new entries Do Not use a generic image such as a "Coming Soon" photo to represent your entries. Do not make a registration out for any model that you DO NOT HAVE a photo of yet. Unapproved images still go into a class and display with whatever image is uploaded. So that generic photo will be the one that displays. Also, you are making double the work for the moderators who go through every day and approve photos since they will disapprove the generic photo and then approve the same registration later when the correct image has over written the generic one. As of April 2010, the moderators will no longer approve generic entries and will simply delete the entire registration from your account.

RULE 2. NAMING THE HORSE:

A. Limit the number of letters and spaces to 25. This is due to the php program.
B. Please do not use any punctuation in the Model Name. The PHP Program that runs the script and shows can not process these.
Example Model Name: No - Blue Moon's Blackie. Yes - Blues Moons Blackie.
Example File Name: No - Red_Dawg_barrels.jpg Yes - RedDawgbarrels.jpg

RULE 3. WESTERN EQUIPMENT

(a)References to hackamore mean the use of a flexible, braided rawhide, leather or rope bosal, the core of which may be either rawhide or flexible cable. A hackamore must use a complete mecate rein, which must include a tie-rein. This rule does not refer to a mechanical hackamore.
(b) References to snaffle bits in western performance classes mean the conventional O-ring, egg-butt or D-ring with a ring no larger than 10 mm model scale. The inside circumference of the ring must be free of rein, curb or headstall attachments which would provide leverage. Optional curb strap attached below the reins on a snaffle bit is acceptable.
(c) References to a bit in western performance classes mean the use of a curb bit that would have shanks and acts with leverage. All curb bits must be free of mechanical device and should be considered a standard western bit.
(d) Slip or gag bits ae not acceptable.
(e) Except for hackamore/snaffle bit classes or junior horses shown with hackamore/snaffle bit, only one hand may be used on the reins, and the hand must not be changed. The hand is to be around the reins; index finger only between split reins is permitted. In trail, it is permissible to change hands to work an obstacle. Violation of this rule is an automatic disqualification.
(f) Romal reins are braided or round material attached to closed reins. The extension of the reins is referred to as a romal. The extension shall be carried in the free hand with at least a 1.6 inch spacing between the reining hand and the free hand holding the romal. When using romal reins, the rider’s hand shall be around the reins with the wrists kept straight and relaxed, the thumb on top and the fingers closed lightly around the reins. When using a romal, no fingers between the reins are allowed. The free hand may not be used to adjust the rider’s length of rein in any reining class. During reining, the use of the free hand while holding the romal to alter the tension or length of the reins from the bridle to the reining hand is considered to be the use of two hands and a score of 0 will be applied, with the exception of any place a horse is allowed to be completely stopped during a pattern. In all other classes, including the reined portion of working cow horse, the free hand may be used to adjust the rider’s length of rein.
(g) The romal shall not be used forward of the cinch or to signal or cue the horse in any way. Any infraction of this rule shall be penalized severely by the judge.
(h) Junior horses competing in junior western pleasure, western horsemanship, reining, working cow horse, western riding and trail that are shown with a hackamore or snaffle bit may be ridden with one or two hands on the reins. The tails of the reins must be crossed on the opposite side of the neck when riding with two hands on split reins except in working cow horse and reining. Closed reins (example mecate) may not be used with a snaffle bit, except in working cow horse and reining, where a mecate is permitted.
(i) In all western classes, horses will be shown in a western saddle and appropriate bridle, snaffle bit or hackamore. A western saddle is a common type of saddle distinguished by a large noticeable fork on which there is some form of horn, a high cantle and large skirts. Silver equipment will not count over a good working outfit. Horses 5-years-old and younger may be shown in a snaffle bit, hackamore, curb bit, half-breed or spade bit. Horses 6-years-old and older may only be shown in a curb bit, halfbreed or spade bit. When a curb bit is used, a curb strap or curb chain is required and lie flat against the jaw of the horse.

(1)Optional equipment
(A) Rope or riata; if used, the rope or riata must be coiled and attached to the saddle.
(B) Hobbles attached to saddle.
(C) Protective boots, leg wraps and bandages are allowed in reining, working cow horse, team penning, barrel racing, pole bending, stake racing, jumping, tie-down roping, breakaway roping, dally team roping - heading, dally team roping - and heeling.
(D) Tie-downs for roping, speed events, team penning and ranch sorting.
(E) Running martingales for speed events, team penning and ranch sorting.
(F) Spurs; not to be used forward of the cinch.

(2)Prohibited Equipment
(A) Protective boots, leg wraps and bandages are prohibited in western pleasure, trail, halter, western riding and showmanship.
(B) Wire chin straps, regardless of how padded or covered.
(C) Any chin strap narrower than one-half inch.
(D) Martingales and draw reins, except for speed events and team penning.
(E) Nosebands and tie-downs, except for roping, speed events and team penning. However, these cannot have any bare metal in contact with the horse’s head. Chain, wire, metal tiedown or bonnets are prohibited, regardless if they are covered.
(F) Jerk lines for roping.
(G) Tack collars for roping.
(H) In roping, speed events, team penning and ranch sorting western type equipment must be used. Use of a hackamore (including mechanical hackamores) or other type of bridles is the optional choice of the contestant; however, the judge may prohibit the use of bits or equipment he may consider severe.
(I) Tapaderos, except in Parade where they are allowed.

RULE 4. ENGLISH EQUIPMENT

(a) In all English classes, an English snaffle (no shank), kimberwick, pelham and/or full bridle (with two reins), all with cavesson nosebands and plain leather brow bands must be used.
(b) Snaffle bit rings may be no larger than 10 mm in diameter. Any bit having a fixed rein requires use of a curb chain.
(c) In the jumping class only, mechanical hackamores may be used.
(d) If a curb bit is used, the chain must lie flat against the jaw of the horse.
(e) Saddles must be black and/or brown leather of traditional hunting or forward seat type, knee insert on the skirt is optional. Saddle pads should fit size and shape, except when necessary to accommodate numbers on both sides, for which a square pad or suitable attachment may be used. Saddle pads and attachments shall be white or natural color with no ornamentation.

(1)Optional equipment
(A) Spurs of the unrowelled type that are blunt, round or that include a smooth rolling rubber ball than one inch
(B) Crops or bats
(C) Gloves
(D) English breast plate
(E) Braiding of mane and/or tail in hunt style
(F) Standing or running martingales in working hunter, jumping and equitation over fences only
(G) Protective boots, leg wraps and bandages are allowed in hunt seat equitation on the flat and hunt seat equitation over fences.

(2)Prohibited equipment
(A) Draw reins
(B) Rowelled spurs
(C) Standing or running martingales except in working hunter, jumping and equitation over fences
(D) Figure 8 or flash cavessons except in jumping
(E) Protective boots, leg wraps and bandages are prohibited in pleasure driving, hunter under saddle and boots of any description (except outdoors during inclement weather) in hunter hack, green working hunter and working hunter.
(F) Rubber reins (except jumping)
(G) Slip on spurs

RULE 5. PLEASURE DRIVING EQUIPMENT

(a) Pleasure driving equipment shall include a whip suitable to the cart, light horse breast collar harness to include surcingle with shaft tie-downs and crupper, standard bridle, overcheck or check reins. Only traditional driving bits: half cheek snaffle, liverpool, elbow driving bit and Bradoon overcheck bits are acceptable.
(b) When a curb chain is used, it must be flat against the jaw of the horse.
(c) The exhibitor shall be the only person permitted in such cart while the horse is being exhibited, and no pets shall be allowed in such cart during such exhibition. The cart shall be a pleasure-type two-wheel single horse cart with seats for one or two persons. All carts must be basket-type, equipped with 24-inch (60 cm) through 48-inch (1.2 meters)cart wheels. No stirrup-type carts or sulkies will be allowed. Dash and basket cover optional.

(1)Optional equipment
(A) Blinders
(B) Breeching, shaft keepers or thimbles
(C) Running martingales
(D) Cavesson nosebands

(2)Prohibited equipment
(A) Wire chin straps, regardless of how padded or covered
(B) Excessive ornamentation on harness, bridle or cart shall be penalized.

RULE 6. ATTIRE

(a) In halter, speed events, team penning and other western classes, appropriate western attire is required which includes pants (slacks, trousers, jeans, etc.) long sleeves and collar (band, standup, tuxedo, etc.) western hat and cowboy boots Spurs and chaps are optional unless riders are showing in trail or pleasure class. Chaps are illegal attire for halter and showmanship Classes. Chaps are required attire for Western Pleasure Arena and Western Trail Arena
(b) It is mandatory for riders in all hunter, jumper and equitation classes, including hunter hack, where jumping is required and when jumping anywhere on the competition ground to wear properly fastened protective headgear.
(c) In all English classes, riders should wear hunt coats of traditional colors such as navy, dark green, grey, black or brown. Maroon and red are improper for English Hunt Seat Arena Pleasure and English Hunt Seat Arena Trail classes. Breeches are to be of traditional shades of buff, khaki, canary, light grey or rust (or jodhpurs), high English boots or paddock (jodhpur) boots of black or brown. Black, navy blue or brown hard hat (with harness for youth in any over fence classes) is mandatory. A tie or choker is required. Gloves, spurs of the unrowelled type that are blunt, round or that include a smooth rolling rubber ball and no longer than one inch. Crops and bats are optional. Hair must be neat and contained (as in net or braid). Judges must penalize contestants who do not conform.
(d) In pleasure driving, the exhibitor shall be neatly attired. A coat, tie and hat of choice may be worn. No part of the exhibitor’s legs may be exposed above mid-calf.

RULE 7. GAITS

(A) The following terminology shall apply in all western classes:

(1) The walk is a natural, flat-footed, four-beat gait. The horse must move straight and true at the walk. The walk must be alert, with a stride of reasonable length in keeping with the size of the horse.
(2) The jog is a smooth, ground-covering two-beat diagonal gait. The horse works from one pair of diagonals to the other pair. The jog should be square, balanced and with straight, forward movement of the feet. Horses walking with their back feet and jogging in the front are not considered performing the required gait. When asked to extend the jog, it moves out with the same smooth way of going.
(3) The lope is an easy, rhythmical three-beat gait. Horses moving to the left should lope on the left lead. Horses moving to the right should lope on the right lead. Horses traveling at a fourbeat gait are not considered to be performing at a proper lope. The horse should lope with a natural stride and appear relaxed and smooth. It should be ridden at a speed that is a natural way of going. The head should be carried at an angle which is natural and suitable to the horse’s breed and conformation at all gaits.

(B) The following terminology shall apply in all English classes:

(1) Walk is a natural, flat-footed, four-beat gait. The horse must move straight and true at the walk. The walk must be alert, with a stride of reasonable length in keeping with the size of the horse. Loss of forward rhythmic movement shall be penalized.
(2) Trot is a two-beat gait, comprising long, low, groundcovering, cadenced and balanced strides. Smoothness is more essential than speed. The knees should remain relatively flat, exhibiting minimal flexion. Short, quick strides and/or extreme speed shall be penalized. When asked to extend the trot, there should be a definite lengthening of the stride.
(3) Canter is a three-beat gait; smooth, free moving, relaxed and straight on both leads. The stride should be long, low and ground covering. Over-collected four-beat canter is to be penalized. Excessive speed is to be penalized.
(4) Hand gallop should be a definite lengthening of the stride with a noticeable difference in speed. The horse should be under control at all times and be able to halt in a smooth, balanced manner.

(C) The following terminology shall apply to Pleasure Driving:

(1) Walk; a natural, flat-footed, four-beat gait. Loss of forward rhythmic movement shall be penalized.
(2) Park gait; a forward, free-flowing, square trot with mpulsion. Loss of forward, rhythmic movement or jogging shall be penalized.
(3) Road gait; an extended trot showing a definite lengthening of stride, with a noticeable difference in speed. Short, quick, animated strides and/or excessive speed shall be penalized.

(D) The following terminology is a description of Western Pleasure gaits:

The Walk
(1) Poor walk - uneven pace and no cadence. Has no flow and may appear intimidated or appear to march.
(2) Average walk - has a four-beat gait, level top-line and is relaxed.
(3) Good walk - has a flowing four-beat gait, level topline, relaxed and is bright and attentive.
The Jog
(1) Extremely poor jog - cannot perform a two-beat gait and has no flow or balance in the motion.
(2) Very poor jog - hesitates in the motion. Does not keep an even and balanced motion or a level top-line. May appear to shuffle.
(3) Poor jog - average motion but has negative characteristics such as; walking with the hind legs, dragging the rear toes or taking an uneven length of stride with the front and rear legs.
(4) Correct or average jog - has a two-beat gait, a level top-line and a relaxed appearance.
(5) Good jog - has an average motion with positive characteristics such as balance and self-carriage while taking the same length of stride with the front and rear legs.
(6) >Very good jog - is comfortable to ride while having a consistent two-beat gait. The horse guides well, appears relaxed and has a level top-line.
(7) Excellent jog - effortless and very efficient motion. Swings the legs yet touches the ground softly. Confident, yet soft with its motion while being balanced and under control. Moves flat with the knee and hock and has some cushion in the pastern. Has a bright and alert expression and exhibits more lift and self-carriage than the “very good jog”.

Moderate Extended Jog
(1) Poor extended jog - never lengthens the stride and may appear rough to ride.
(2) Average extended jog - moves up in its pace and appears smooth to ride.
(3) Good extended jog - has an obvious lengthening of stride with a slight increase in pace while exerting less effort and appears smooth to ride.
The Lope
(1) Extremely poor lope - does not have a three-beat gait. Has no flow, rhythm or balance. Appears uncomfortable to ride.
(2) Very poor lope - appears to have a three-beat lope but has no lift or self-carriage. The horse shuffles, has no flow and bobs his head, giving the appearance of exerting a great deal of effort to perform the gait. Also may appear uncomfortable to ride.
(3) Poor lope - has an average motion but exhibits negative characteristics like head bobbing, not completing the stride with the front leg and leaving the outside hock well behind the horse’s buttocks.
(4) Average lope - has a true three-beat gait with a level top-line and very little head and neck motion. He is relatively straight (not over-canted), guides well and has a relaxed appearance
(5) Good lope - has an average motion but exhibits positive characteristics in his performance like self-carriage, a steady topline, relaxed appearance and is responsive to the rider’s aids.
(6) Very good lope - has more lift and flow than the average horse. He has a strong but smooth drive from behind. He may bend his knee slightly yet still has a level top-line while exhibiting self-carriage with a relaxed appearance. Appears comfortable to ride.
(7) Excellent lope - has a round back with an effortless strong, deep stride with the rear legs and a flat swing with the front legs. He keeps a level top-line, a relaxed yet alert and confident appearance and is correct but soft. A special horse with a great degree of lift and self-carriage.

The Back-Up
(1) Poor back-up - is resistant and heavy in front. May gap the mouth and throw his head or back crooked.
(2) Average back-up - backs straight and quietly with light contact and without hesitation.
(3) Good back-up - displays balanced and smooth flowing movements. Backs straight with self-carriage without gapping the mouth with light contact and without hesitation.

RULE 8. BREED CONFORMATION

(a) A breed conformation class is defined as a class where the horse is judged based upon its conformation.
(b) The purpose of the class is to select the best individuals in the order of their resemblance to the breed ideal and that are the most positive combination of balance, structural correctness, and movement with appropriate breed, gender characteristics and proper conformation, structure and muscling.
(c) The horse should possess eye appeal that is the result of a harmonious blending of an attractive head; refined throat latch; well-proportioned, trim neck; long, sloping shoulder; deep heart girth; short back; strong loin and coupling; long hip and croup; and well-defined and muscular stifle, gaskin, forearm and chest. These characteristics should be coupled with straight and structurally correct legs and feet that are free of blemishes. If in gait the model horse should be a balanced athlete that is muscled uniformly throughout.
(d) Photos submitted for halter judging are not based on artistic merit and therefore are required to be submitted taken from a full side view profile or slightly angled.
(e) All horses should be rated upon objective evaluation of the following four traits:
(1) balance
(2) Structural correctness
(3) Breed and gender characteristics
(4) The degree of muscling the horse displays.
Of the four, balance is the single most important, and refers to the structural and aesthetic blending of body parts. Balance is influenced almost entirely by skeletal structure so it is important that the artist captures and recreates the skeletal structure first so that the muscling and therefore then the balance will also be correct.
(f) Halter Equipment
When using a chain and leather lead shank the chain may be attached to the halter in the following manner:
(1) Looped through the bottom O ring and clipped back to top of leather junction.
(2) Fed through left side cheek ring over the nose and through the right side cheek
(3) Fed through left side cheek ring under the chin and through the right side cheek ring up to right side jaw ring and clicked off.
(4) Under no circumstances must the lead snap be connected directly to the bottom O ring of the halter.

RULE 9. PERFORMANCE CLASSES

(1) A judge may, at his/her discretion, penalize a horse for excessive or exaggerated switching or wringing of the tail.
(2) The fall of a horse or rider being judged shall be cause for disqualification in all classes. Rider is considered to have fallen when he or she is not astride.
(3) Barrels shall not be used as markers in any event except barrel racing.
(4) Holding the saddle with either hand will result in a disqualification, except for speed events, roping or cow work portion of working cow horse, cutting, reining and trail

RULE 10. WESTERN PLEASURE ARENA:

(a) A good pleasure horse has a free-flowing stride of reasonable length in keeping with his conformation. He should cover a reasonable amount of ground with little effort. Ideally, he should have a balanced, flowing motion, while exhibiting correct gaits that are of the proper cadence. The quality of the movement and the consistency of the gaits is a major consideration. He should carry his head and neck in a relaxed, natural position, with his poll level with or slightly above the level of the withers. He should not carry his head behind the vertical, giving the appearance of intimidation, or be excessively nosed out, giving a resistant appearance. His head should be level with his nose slightly in front of the vertical, having a bright expression with his ears alert. He should be shown on a reasonably loose rein, but with light contact and control. He should be responsive, yet smooth, in transitions when called for. When asked to extend, he should move out with the same flowing motion. Maximum credit should be given to the flowing, balanced and willing horse that gives the appearance of being fit and a pleasure to ride.
(A) Horses 6 years old and older must be shown on a bit.
(B) Horses 5 years old and younger may be shown in either bit, hackamore or snaffle bit.
(b) This class will be judged on the performance, condition and conformation of the horse.
(c) Photos to show the horse may be any of the following:
To work on the rail at either the left or right way of the ring and at one of the any of the three gaits to demonstrate the horse's ability with different leads. Horse is allowed to extend the walk, or a moderate extension of the jog. A moderate extension of the jog is a definite two-beat lengthening of stride, covering more ground. Cadenced and balanced with smoothness is more essential than speed. Riders should sit at the moderated extension of the jog. Horses are required to back easily and stand quietly. Passing is permissible and should not be penalized as long as the horse maintains a proper and even cadence and rhythm.
(d) Horses are to be reversed to the inside (away from the rail). They may be required to reverse at the walk or jog at the discretion of the judge, but shall not be asked to reverse at the lope.
(e) Rider shall not be required to dismount except in the event the judge wishes to check equipment.
(f) Horses may be photographed at a walk, jog and lope on a reasonably loose rein or light contact without undue restraint.
(j) Faults to be scored according to severity:
(1) Excessive speed (any gait)
(2) Being on the wrong lead
(3) Breaking gait (including not walking when called for)
(4) Excessive slowness in any gait, loss of forward momentum (resulting in an animated and/or artificial gait at the lope)
(5) Failure to take the appropriate gait when called for (during transitions, excessive delay will be penalized)
(6) Touching horse or saddle with free hand
(7) Head carried too high
(8) Head carried too low (tip of ear below the withers)
(9) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
(10) Excessive nosing out
(11) Opening mouth excessively
(12) Stumbling
(13) Use of spurs forward of the cinch
(14) If a horse appears sullen, dull, lethargic, emaciated, drawn or overly tired
(15) Quick, choppy or pony-strided
(16) If reins are draped to the point that light contact is not maintained.
(17) Overly canted at the lope. (when the outside hind foot is further to the inside of the arena than the inside front foot)
(18) Head carried too low (tip of ear below the withers)
(19) Over flexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical

RULE 11. WESTERN PLEASURE NATURAL:

Western Pleasure Natural is a class that was written for hobbyists and does not exist in the real world. It is for hobbyists that do not own arena fencing but still want to enter a western pleasure entry. There are no arena fences and most of all No Trail Obstacles in the class. Attire and tack may be somewhat more relaxed as well.
A The rider is not judged but is important for posture, cueing and steering. The class is judged on manners and performance of the horse.
B Regardless of breed the horse should perform with a lower head than a natural one, relaxed gaits, slow jog, slow lope and smooth loose or light rein.
C The head and neck should be carried appropriately for a relaxed performance in accordance to the horse's breed type and conformation.
D Horses shall be shown on a reasonable loose rein. Extremes of too tight or too loose should be penalized.
E Pleasure Pleasure Natural is a more relaxed setting than that of the Arena class the faults of the horse and rider should be scored accordingly:
(1) Wrong lead or break of gait
(2) Stopping rough or crooked
(3) Failure to maintain a pivot foot
(4) Rough transitions
(5) Showing resistance when cued or reined
(6) If rider is used than posting the jog
(7) If rider is used than any stiff, artificial, or unnatural body, leg, arm and/or head position
(8) Poor position of exhibitor in saddle
(9) Rider showing a loose leg with open knee, legs too far forward or back
(10) Riders toes pointed down
(11) Riders shoulders held crooked or arms held in a straight, unbent position
(12) Reins too long, too short, or uneven
F Photo's used in Western Pleasure Natural are not to be crossed entered into Western Trail Natural.

RULE 12. WESTERN BAREBACK PLEASURE:

This class is seen in the non rider shows and is judged on manners and performance of the horse. Gaits are judged in the same manner as other Western classes (see RULE 7 Western Gaits) The Western bareback pleasure horse regardless of breed performs with a lower head than a natural one, relaxed gaits, slow jog, slow lope and smooth loose or light rein. The head and neck should be carried appropriately for a relaxed performance in accordance to the horses's breed type and conformation.

A The correct fit of the headstall, bit and reins should be a large basis of the judging and placement of this class.
B Sticky wax is allowed to set the reins correctly. The entrant should not just lay the that they are being held in a rider's hand if that rider were present in the photo.

RULE 13. WESTERN BAREBACK EQUITATION:

(A) A doll rider is required for this class. The rider is judged in this class on their ability to ride and control a horse properly without the use of a stock saddle. The rider shall be judged on their basic position: position of hand or hands, leg position, seat position and back position. To further explain, a rider should sit in a balanced relaxed manner, up close to the horse’s withers, keeping the back straight and shoulders even. The rider should keep their arms in close to the body. The rein hand or hands should be held loosely and should be positioned directly above and in front of where the saddle horn would be if the exhibitor were using a saddle. The position of the rider’s free hand is optional but should indicate a relaxed, not sloppy, balanced attitude of the body and should be kept free of the horse except that rider may hold a romal to keep it from swinging and to adjust the position of the reins provided it is held at least 16 inches from the reining hand. The legs maintain contact with the horse, giving the necessary leg grip. The foot is turned out slightly and the heels should be level or slightly lowered close to the horse just behind the horse’s elbows. The rider should be in balance with their horse at all times and should be able to sit the trot bareback. No posting at the trot will be permitted. An imaginary straight line drawn from the rider’s shoulders or hip should drop at the back of the heel and a straight line from the knee should drop in front of the toe. The rider set up in photo should readily convey their ability of how to handle a horse properly. The rider is penalized if they use two hands on the reins (except when riding a junior horse in an acceptable snaffle bit or hackamore/bosal), changes hands on the reins, or touches any part of the horse with their free hand. While the horse is in motion the rider’s hands shall be clear of the horse.
(B) Photo may depict rail work consisting of any of the three gaits, walk, jog or lope, extended jog, both directions of the arena, the stop either on the rail or in a line up and the back up.
(C) Photo may also depict any of the following individual works normally performed as a pattern individually in the center of the arena:
1 Back
2 Walk, jog, trot, lope, in a straight line, curve or circle, or any combination of these gaits and patterns such as figure eights, etc.
3 Stop
4 Turn on the haunches or forehand
5 Side pass
6 Simple lead change
7 Flying lead change
8 Counter canter
9 Extended gaits

RULE 14. WESTERN YOUTH CLASSES

A. LEADLINE EQUITATION

1 The class will enter the ring at a flat-footed walk, as designated. The class will be worked at a walk only both directions of the ring. In the line-up the judge may ask the exhibitors to back up their horses to help him or her judge the extent of the exhibitor’s horsemanship. Judge may ask the rider one question on the topic of horse care or horsemanship.
2 The exhibitor will be judged on his or her basic position in the saddle such as Hand position, seat position, and back position. The horse must be led and controlled by an adult. A leather lead shank at least six feet long must be attached to the shank of the bit or to a halter that is under the bridle so that while the exhibitor is on the rail the horse is controlled by the adult. If the judge asks the exhibitor to back the horse in the line-up, the adult should not aid the exhibitor. The adult should only keep the horse under control. Person leading horse is to be dressed in accordance with the exhibitor.
3 A junior horse ridden two-handed in an acceptable snaffle bit or hackamore/bosal may be exhibited in Leadline.
4 This class is limited to exhibitors 6 years old and under who do not participate in any approved class at that show except Showmanship and Halter.
5 In leadline chaps are required as a western requirement.

B. WALK-TROT EQUITATION

1 The conditions of this class are the same as outlined under Western Equitation (with the exception that contestants will not be asked to lope but may be asked to extend the jog or trot).
2 The judge shall not work exhibitors individually.
3 The class will enter the arena as designated. The class will be worked at a walk and trot both directions of the ring. In the line-up the judge may ask exhibitors to back up their horses to help him judge the extent of the exhibitor’s horsemanship.
4 The exhibitor will be judged on his or her basic position in the saddle such as hand position, leg position and back position. The exhibitor will also be judged on his/her ability to govern, control and properly exhibit the mount he/she is riding.
5 This class is limited to exhibitors 10 years and under.
6 If the horse breaks into a lope it shall be disqualified.

RULE 15. WESTERN TRAIL ARENA

(a) This class will be judged on the performance of the horse over obstacles, with emphasis on manners, response to the rider and quality of movement. Credit will be given to horses negotiating the obstacles with style and some degree of speed, providing correctness is not sacrificed. Horses should receive credit for showing attentiveness to the obstacles and the capability of picking their own way through the course when obstacles warrant it, and willingly responding to the rider’s cues on more difficult obstacles. An arena fence is required.
(b) Horses shall be penalized for any unnecessary delay while approaching or negotiating the obstacles. Horses with artificial appearance over obstacles should be penalized.
(c) Horses must not be required to work on the rail. Photo shall depict one the three gaits (walk, jog, lope) over an obstacle and quality of movement and cadence should be considered as part of the maneuver score. While on the line of travel between obstacles, the horse shall be balanced, carrying his head and neck in a relaxed and natural position in accordance to it's breed standard. The head should not be carried behind the vertical, giving the appearance of intimidation, or be excessively nosed out, giving a resistant appearance.
(d) Penalties should be assessed per occurrence as follows:
One (1) Point:
1. Incorrect or break of gait at walk or jog
2. Both front or hind feet in a single-strided slot or space at a walk or jog
3. Skipping over or failing to step into required space
4. Split pole in lope-over
5. Incorrect number of strides, if specified
Three (3) Point:
1. Off of lead or break of gait at lope
2. Knocking down an elevated pole, cone, barrel, planet, obstacle, or severely disturbing an obstacle
3. Stepping outside of the confines of, falling or jumping off or out of obstacle with designated boundaries with one foot once the foot has entered obstacle; including missing one element of an obstacle on a line of travel with one foot
Five (5) Point:
1. Dropping slicker or object required to be carried on course
2. First or second cumulative refusal, balk, or evading an obstacle by shying or backing
3. Letting go of gate or dropping rope gate
4. Use of either hand to instill fear or praise
6. Stepping outside the confines of, falling or jumping off or out of an obstacle with designated boundaries with more than one foot once the foot has entered obstacle; including missing one element of an obstacle on a line of travel with more than one foot
7. Blatant disobedience (including kicking out, bucking, rearing, striking)
8. Faults, which occur on the line of travel between obstacles, scored according to severity:
a. head carried too high
b. head carried too low (tip of ear below the withers)
c. over-flexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
d. excessive nosing out
e. opening mouth excessively
f. holding saddle with either hand
Disqualified (0) Score:
1. Use of two hands (except in snaffle bit or hackamore classes desinated for two hands) or changing hands on reins; except for junior horses shown with hackamore or snaffle bit, only one hand may be used on the reins, except that it is permissible to change hands to work an obstacle.
2. Excessively or repeatedly touching the horse on the neck to lower the head
3. Entering or exiting an obstacle from the incorrect side or direction
4. Third cumulative refusal, balk, or evading an obstacle by shying or backing
5. Failure to ever demonstrate correct gait between obstacle as designated
6. Failure to follow the correct line of travel between obstacles

(g)Approved Obstacles are:
(1) Opening, passing through and closing gate. (Losing control of gate is to be penalized.) Use a gate which will not endanger horse or rider. If the gate has a metal, plastic or wooden support bar under the opening, contestants must work the gate moving forward through it.
(2) Ride over at least four logs or poles. These can be in a straight line, curved, zigzag or raised. The space between the logs is to be measured and the path the horse is to take should be the measuring point. All elevated elements must be placed in a cup, notched block, or otherwise secured so they cannot roll. The height should be measured from the ground to the top of the element. Care should be given to keep in mind the scale for the spacing of real walkovers, trotovers, and lopeovers which are:
(A) The spacing for walkovers shall be 20” to 24” (40cm to 60 cm) and may be elevated to 12” (30 cm). Elevated walkovers should be set at least 22” (55 cm) apart.
(B) The spacing for trotovers shall be 3’ to 3’6” (90cm-105 cm) and may be elevated to 8” (20 cm).
(C) The spacing for lopeovers shall be 6’ to 7’ (1.8 to 2.1 meters) or increments thereof, and may be elevated to 8” (20cm).
(3) Backing obstacle. Backing obstacles to be spaced a minimum of 28” (70 cm). If elevated, 30” (75 cm) spacing is required. Entrants cannot be asked to back over a stationary object such as a wooden pole or metal bar.
(A) Back through and around at least three markers.
(B) Back through L, V, U, straight or similar-shaped course. May be elevated no more than 24” (60 cm).
(4) Artificial Water hazard of tarp as long as no metal or slick bottom-boxes are used.
(5) Serpentine obstacles at walk or jog. Spacing to be minimum of 6’ ( 1.8 meters) for jog.
(6) Carry object from one part of arena to another. (Only objects which reasonably might be carried on a trail ride may be used.)
(7) Ride over wooden bridge. (Suggested minimum width shall be scale to realistic meet that of real life trail bridge rulings of 36” (90 cm) wide and at least six feet long). No railing may be used. Bridge should be sturdy, safe and negotiated at a walk only.
(8) Put on and remove slicker.
(9) Remove and replace materials from mailbox.
(10) Side pass (may be elevated to 12” (30 cm) maximum) as long as the ends are placed in a safe roll out or jump style knock down cup.
(11) An obstacle consisting of four logs or rails, each 5’ to 7’ (1.5 to 2.1 meters) long, laid in a square. Each contestant will enter the square by riding over log or rail as designated. When all four feet are inside the square, rider should execute a turn, as indicated, and depart.
(12) A combination of two or more of any obstacle listed above is acceptable.

(h)Unacceptable Obstacles:
(1) Tires
(2) Animals
(3) Hides
(4) PVC pipe
(5) Dismounting
(6) Jumps
(7) Rocking or moving bridges
(8) Water box with floating or moving parts
(9) Flames, dry ice, fire extinguisher, etc.
(10) Logs or poles elevated in a manner that permits such to roll
(11) Ground Ties

RULE 16: WESTERN TRAIL NATURAL WITH OBSTACLE

This class is seen only in the model horse hobby. It is written for those people who wish to compete in trail class but do not have arena wall props. Some rulings, attire and equipment may be relaxed slightly. Natural trail classes are judged under the same rules and with the same requirements as Arena Trail but are held outside of the arena using natural obstacles such as creeks, ponds, uphill and downhills slopes, ditches fallen trees, bushes, pasture gates, etc. The natural trail class should be judged on realism, imagination, and the horse's apparent ability to provide a safe and pleasurable ride. Any western style tack and any attire permitted; curb bits should include straps, saddles should have girths. Unsafe equipment may be penalized at the judge's decision. Any misbehavior should be penalized, including but not limited to shying, bucking, rearing, fighting the bridle, being above the bit, jumping or leaping away of the obstacle.

RULE 17: CUTTING

A class in which a horse and rider enter a herd usually on the back wall of the arena and separates one from the group. The horse keeps the selected cow from returning to the herd. The horse is judged on skill, agility and ability and is given 90 seconds to work two cattle. There is an option to a third cow if time allows. There are two herd holders to the right and left of the area were the rider works the entry (they keep the herd on the rail) and two turn back riders on the opposite side of the rider working the cow. Their job is to keep the chosen cow interested in returning to the herd. Bovines used in cutting are usually cows or steers and not calves. If calves are used there should be a penalty. Goats and other animal can used in cutting or stock work classes in training conditions but this should be specified with a comment line.

You Score Cutting on the following basis:
1 Each horse is required to enter the herd sufficiently deep enough to show his ability to make a cut. One such deep cut will satisfy this rule. Failure to satisfy this requirement will result in a three (3) point penalty. A horse will be given credit for his ability to enter the herd quietly with very little disturbance to the herd or to the one brought out.

2 When an animal is cut from the herd, it is more desirable that it be taken toward the center of the arena, and credit will be rewarded for same. Additional credit will be given the horse which drives his stock suffi ient distance from the herd to assure that the herd will not be disturbed by his work, thereby showing his ability to drive a cow.

3 Riding with a loose rein throughout a performance is a requirement and will be recognized.

4 Credit will be recognized for setting up a cow and controlling it in a working position as near the center of the arena as possible.

5 If the cutting horse or his rider creates disturbance at any time throughout his working period (2-1/2 minutes), he will be penalized:
a. Any noise directed by the contestant toward the cattle will be penalized one 1) point.
b. Each time a horse runs into the herd, scatters the herd while working or picks up cattle through fault of the horse, he will be penalized three (3) points. The entire cow must enter working area of horse.

6 A horse will be penalized three (3) points each time the back fence actually stops or turns the animal being worked within one step (three [3] feet) of the fence; the back fence to be agreed on and designated by the judge or judges before the contest starts; meaning the actual fence only, no imaginary line from point to point to be considered. If any of the contestants voice an objection before the contest starts, the judge or judges shall take a vote of the contestants, and a “back fence” acceptable to the majority shall be designated and used.

7 If a horse turns the wrong way with tail toward animal being worked, an automatic score of 60 points will be given.

8 While working, a horse will be penalized one (1) point each time the reins are used to control or direct (to rein) the horse, regardless of whether the reins are held high or low. A one (1) point penalty shall also be charged whenever a horse is visibly cued in any manner. If the reins are tight enough that the bits are bumped at any time, he shall be penalized one (1) point each time even though the hand of the rider does not move.
a. A horse must be released as soon as the desired animal is clear of the other cattle. Additional reining, cuing or positioning will result in a one (1) point penalty for each occurrence.
b. The rider shall hold the bridle reins in one hand. The exception is a hackamore or snaffle where two hands are on the rein.
A three (3) point penalty shall be charged if the second hand touches the reins for any purpose except to straighten them.
c. Cueing behind the shoulder shall not be considered a visible cue. A three (3) point penalty shall be assessed each time a horse is cued in the shoulder.
d. A toe, foot, or stirrup on the horse’s shoulder is considered a visible cue. A one (1) point penalty shall be charged for each occurrence.

9 If a horse lets an animal that he is working get back in the herd, he will be penalized five (5) points.

10 If a rider changes cattle after visibly committing to a specific cow, a five (5) point penalty will be assessed.

11 When a horse loses his working advantage, loses eye contact with cow, misses a cow, or is working out of position; he will be penalized (a) ½ point, (A) 1 point, or (F) 1 point.

12 Unnecessary roughness, such as a horse actually pawing, biting or kicking cattle, will be penalized three (3) points.

13 A contestant may quit an animal when it is obviously stopped, obviously turned away, or is obviously behind the turnback horses and the turnback horses are behind the time line. A penalty of three (3) points must be charged if the animal is quit under any other circumstances.

14 If a horse quits a cow, a penalty of five (5) points will be assessed.

15 If a horse clears the herd with two (2) or more cattle and fails to separate a single animal before quitting, a five (5) point penalty will be charged. There is no penalty if time expires.

16 Horses must be ridden with a bridle having a bit in the mouth or with ahackamore. All bridles on horses must have split reins. A bridle shall have no nose band or bosal and hackamores shall be of rope or braided rawhide with no metal parts. Braided rawhide balls across the horse’s nose are not permissible. A judge must be able to freely pass two fingers between the hackamore and muzzle completely around the horse’s nose. Choke ropes, tie downs, wire around the horse’s neck, nose, or brow band, tight nose band, quirt, bat or mechanical device giving the rider undue control over a horse will not be permitted. Wire of any kind and on any part of the curb device is not permissible. Leather curb straps or curb chains must be at least 3/8 of an inch in width and must be attached to the bit by nylon string, nylon straps, or leather straps. Decorative knots, rawhide balls or tassels are not permitted on curb devices. Breast collar may be used, no portion of which may pass over the horse’s neck. Breast collars attached to the swell of the saddle on competing horses will be considered illegal. Chaps and spurs may be worn. A competing horse’s tail cannot be tied in any manner which would restrict movement of the tail. Any time a contestant is guilty of an infraction of this rule or any part therein, he shall be disqualified.

17 Contestants must wear long sleeved shirts with collars and buttons or snaps completely down the shirt front. T-shirts and slipover knits are not permissible. Sweaters may be worn over an appropriate shirt. Long sleeves must be worn rolled down. For youth classes only, safety helmets are permissible in place of a western hat.

18 When a contestant is thrown from a horse or the horse falls to the ground, the run shall be terminated and no score (0) will be given.

19 Any rider who allows his horse to quit working or leave the working area before his allotted time is up will be disqualified for that go round with no score.

20 No award will be given to any entry where it dipicts any of the following errors:
Gates that are open, fences falling down or objects or entering or falling into or animals entering the working portion of the arena, but would not apply to cattle scattering through wildness or normal arena activities.

21 A judge should a cutting entry form sixty (60) to eighty (80) points. One-half (1/2) points are permissible.

21 When the judge is in doubt about a penalty, the benefit always goes to the contestant.
Penalties: 1 point off:
a) (miss) losing working advantage (11)
b) reined unless a hackamore or snaffle bit is used or visibly cued (8)
c) noise directed to cattle (5a)
d) toe, foot or stirrup on the shoulder (8d)
e) hold on too long on a cut (8a)
f) working out of position
Penalties: 3 points off:
(a) hot quit (13)
(b) cattle picked up or scattered (5b)
(c) second hand on reins unless a hackamore bosal or snaffle bit is used (8b)
(d) cue in shoulder (8c)
(e) pawing or biting cattle (12)
(f) failure to make a deep cut (1)
(g) back fence (6)
Penalties: 5 points off:
(a) horse quitting a cow (14)
(b) losing a cow (9)
(c) changing cattle after a specific commitment(10)
(d) 5 points—failure to separate a single animal after leaving the herd (15)
Penalties: 60 points off:
(a) if horse turns tail (7)
(b) if horse falls to ground (17)
Disqualification (score 0):
illegal equipment, or leaves working area before time expires

23 EXTRA CREDIT:
A. for entering the herd quietly with very little disturbance to the herd or to the animal brought out (RULE 1).
B. for taking an animal toward the center of the arena (RULE 2).
C. for driving a cow a sufficient distance from the herd to assure that the herd will not be disturbed by the contestant’s work (RULE 2).
D. for riding with a loose rein throughout a performance (RULE 3).
E. for setting up a cow and holding it in a working position as near the center of the arena as possible (RULE 4).
F. Never losing eye contact with cow the horse is working. (RULE 11)

24 RUN CONTENT:
Herd Work—Driving a cow
Controlling the cow—Working in center of arena
Degree of Difficulty
Eye Appeal
Time Worked
Amount of Courage
Loose Reins
Horse Charging
Forced Off a Cow
Excessive Herdholder Help

25 Penalties – Amount Points Off - By RULE Listed

One Point:
(A) Miss-Loss of working advantage—11
 (a) 1/2 Miss-Loss of working advantage—11
(B) Reining or visibly cueing—8
(C) Noise directed toward cattle—5a
(D) Toe, foot or stirrup on shoulder—8d
(E) Hold on too long on a cut—8a
(F) Working out of position

Three Point:
(A) Hot quit—13
(B) Cattle picked up or scattered—5b
(C) Second hand on the reins—8b
(D) Spur in the shoulder—8c
(E) Pawing or biting cattle—12
(F) Failure to make a deep cut—1
(G) Back Fence—6

Five Point:
(A) Horse quitting a cow—14
(B) Losing a cow—9
(C) Changing cattle after a specific commitment—10
(D) Failure to separate a single animal after leaving the herd—15

Sixty Points:
(A) If horse turns tail—7
(B) If horse falls to ground—17

Disqualification (score 0):
Illegal equipment, or leaving working area before time expires, or inhumane treatment to the horse.

RULE 18: ROPING

The purpose of any roping class is to provide an opportunity for the horse to demonstrate and be judged on its natural talent and ability, its willingness to perform, and the level of training that makes it suitable for competitive timed roping events outside the show horse arena. The rope horse will be evaluated through a series of individually judged maneuvers that when combined result in a score that most accurately exemplifies that rope horse’s ability to allow its rider to catch and handle a calf and/or steer most efficiently and effectively.

(a) Horses must start from the roping box.

(b) Calf roping and heading horses only (whether being judged or not) in dally team roping must start from behind a barrier (an electronic barrier is acceptable).

(c) Only the horse’s performance, including manners behind the barrier and at all other times, is to be judged.

(d) The contestant shall not attempt to rope the animal until the barrier flag has been dropped. Any attempt by a contestant to position his horse behind the barrier enabling the contestant to rope the animal without attempting to leave the box shall be disqualified.

(e) Breaking the barrier, or any unnecessary whipping, jerking reins, talking or any noise making, slapping, jerking rope or any unnecessary action to induce the horse to perform better, will be considered a fault and scored accordingly.

CALF ROPING

(a) The roper may throw only two loops and must be done so within a one-minute time limit from the time the calf leaves the chute.

(b) In open competition, if more than one loop is thrown, the roper must carry a second rope tied to the saddle, and this rope must be used for the second loop.

(c) Youth or amateurs who desire to throw the second loop, may recoil rope or use a second rope tied to saddle.

(d) If the roper fails to catch, he will retire from the arena with no score.

(e) Any catch that holds is legal, but rope must remain on calf until tie is completed and roper has mounted horse.

(f) If calf is not standing when roper reaches calf, the roper must re-throw calf by hand, crossing any three feet, and tie with not less than one complete wrap and a half hitch.

(g) Rope must be run through a foul rope around the horse’s neck, and may, at the discretion of the rider, be run through a “keeper”. If a keeper is used, it must be attached to the noseband of the tie-down but never in front of the head stall and cannot be attached to the bridle or bit. The Neck Foul Rope is required, it keeps the rope from being tangled and keeps the calf from running out to the right. A neck rope is tied around the crest of the neck. The end of the lariat is fed through the neck rope. The foul rope by consist of a rope loop around the neck or may be attached back to the saddle horn or go through the underneath of the gullet and back up to saddle horn and tied off.

(h) Only the roper may touch the calf while the horse is being judged. Roper may dismount from either side and leg or flank calf.

(i) Scoring will be on the basis of 0-100, with 70 denoting an average performance. Each maneuver will be scored from a plus three to a minus three, in 1/2 point increments.

(j) The tie-down roping horse will be judged on four different maneuvers:
(1) box and barrier
(2) running and rating
(3) stop
(4) working the rope

The following deductions will result:

One (1) Point:
• dragging the calf while being tied, deduct one point for each three feet moved up to 12 feet.

Two (2) Point:
• freeze-up in the box (refusing to move)
• jumping the barrier
• setting up or scotching
• rubbing the rope
• failure to continue backing while roper is flanking the calf
• slack in the rope

Three (3)Point:
• a two-loop run
Five (5) Point:
• refusing to enter the box
• rearing in the box
• breaking the barrier
• running into the calf
• dragging the calf, after the calf is tied, from six to 12 feet (special consideration should be given for excessive movement of the calf after the calf is tied)
• horse walking up the rope (rope on ground)
• blatant disobedience including kicking, biting, bucking, rearing and striking

Disqualified (0) – Score:
• failure of calf to stay tied until roper has remounted and ridden forward to loosen rope.
• excessive schooling at any time in the arena.
• whipping or hitting the horse with the rope.
• initiating the run with the rope on the opposite side of the horse’s neck than exhibitors roping hand.
• dragging the calf, while being tied or after the calf is tied, more than 12 feet.
• any attempt by a contestant to position his horse behind the barrier enabling the contestant to rope the animal without attempting to leave the box.

The following shall be faults scored according to severity:

• jerking the reins
• slapping
• jerking the rope or any unnecessary action to enhance the performance of the horse
• turning around in the box
• turning head severely
• squatting in the corner
• stopping crooked
• rearing up in stop
• ducking off
• looking off while working the rope
• shying away while roper is remounting

BREAKAWAY ROPING.

Available only in the amateur and youth divisions, this is a timed event with a one-minute time limit.

(a) This event shall be performed following the same general rules as youth calf roping.

(b) Horse must start from behind a barrier. A 10-second penalty will be added to the time for breaking the barrier. Calves must be used.

(c) Two loops will be permitted. One or two ropes are to be tied to the saddle horn by a heavy string, in such a manner as to allow the rope to be released from the horn when the calf reaches the end of the rope. A visible cloth or flag must be attached to the end of the rope tied to the horn to make it easier for the flagger to see it break free.

(d) The contestant may free his first rope from the horn after a miss, before getting his second loop ready if he wishes.

(e) The contestant shall receive no time should he break the rope from the horn by hand or touch the rope or string after the catch is made. If the rope dallies or will not break free when the calf reaches the end of it, the contestant will receive no time.

(f) Time will be called from drop of flag at barrier to the break of rope string from the saddle horn. Roping the calf without releasing the loop from the hand is not permitted.

(g) The contestant shall not attempt to rope the animal until the barrier flag has been dropped. Any attempt by a contestant to position his horse behind the barrier, enabling the contestant to rope the calf without leaving the barrier or box, shall be considered a disqualification.

(h) Rope may not pass through bridle, tie-down, neck rope or any other device.

(i) A judge may, at his discretion, use the ring steward, other show officials or approved judges to assist as barrier judges and to help determine legal catches or any rule infractions.

(j) It is recommended, whenever possible, the judge be on horseback and flag the class.

DALLY TEAM ROPING – HEADING AND HEELING

(a) The heading horse and the heeling horse are to be entered and scored individually, not as a team. If a contesting horse makes more than one run as a header, or as a heeler, it must be designated ahead of time as to which run is to be judged.
(b) All heading and heeling cattle shall be protected by horn wraps. Legal catches in heading are both horns, half-head and around the neck. Any figure-eight catch or front leg in the catch is not legal. Any catch made by the heeler not being judged must be a legal catch defined as a catch that holds from behind the steer’s shoulders and back, around the flank, or on one or both heels, but not by the tail only. Any catch made by the header not being judged which holds from the neck forward, other than a front leg in the catch, is considered legal and acceptable.
(c) The roper on the horse being judged may throw only two loops. If more than one loop is thrown, rider must recoil rope and build additional loop or loops. If the roper fails to catch, he will retire from the arena with no score.
(d) The rider who is heeling for the header may use two loops within the one-minute time limit from the time the steer is released from the chute.
(e) The rider who is heading for the heeler may use two loops.
(f) The header must head the steer and the heeler must heel the steer. Horses cannot switch positions.
(g) Riders are to stay mounted. When both ropes are dallied and both horses are facing stretched steer, run is completed. The rope must be wrapped around the saddle horn at least one complete turn before it is considered a dally. Riders age 50 and over and females are permitted to have their rope tied onto the horn of the saddle when heeling.
(h) Each contestant will select the other member of his team, who may or may not be competing in this class.
(i) The amateur being judged may be assisted by anyone, amateur or non-amateur.
(j) The youth being judged may be assisted by any youth, contestant or non-contestant, or any adult.
(k) Scoring will be on the basis of 0-100, with 70 denoting an average performance. Each maneuver will be scored from a plus three to a minus three, in 1/2 point increments.

(l) The heading horse will be judged on four different maneuvers:
(1) Box and Barrier
(2) Running and Rating
(3) Setting and Handling
(4) Facing

The following deductions will result:

Two (2) Point:
• ducking off setting up or scotching failure to face completely
• freeze up while facing
• jumping the barrier
• freeze up in the box (refusing to move)

Three (3)Point:
• a three-loop run

Five (5) Point:

• running into the steer
• refusing to pull
• blatant disobedience including kicking, biting, bucking, rearing and striking refusing to enter the box rearing up in box
• broken barrier

Disqualified (0) – Score
• excessive schooling at any time in the arena
• whipping or striking the horse with the rope
• if both the header and heeler fail to complete both catches within one minute from the time the steer leaves the chute
• loss of rope by either the header or the heeler
• failure of the roper on the horse being judged to catch with no more than two loops. If more than one loop is thrown, rider must recoil rope and build an additional loop.
• failure to maintain a dally through the completion of the run. The rope must be wrapped around the saddle horn at least one complete turn before it is considered a dally refusal to face

The following shall be faults scored according to severity:

• jerking the reins
• slapping
• jerking the rope or any unnecessary action to enhance the performance of the horse
• turning around in the box
• turning head severely
• squatting in the corner
• incorrect position
• failure to rate
• failure to run to steer
• horse being outrun by the steer

(m) The heeling horse will be judged on four different maneuvers:

(1) Box
(2) Run and Rate
(3) Position
(4) Stopping

The following deductions will result:

Two (2) Point:
• header breaking the barrier

Three (3)Point:
• a three-loop run

Five (5) Point:
• assuming position on the wrong side of the steer
• running into the steer
• failure to stop on hindquarters and hold position through the completion of the run
• blatant disobedience including kicking, biting, bucking, rearing and striking
• refusing to enter the box
• rearing up in box

Disqualified (0) – Score:
• excessive schooling at any time in the arena
• whipping or striking the horse with the rope
• if both the header and heeler fail to complete both catches within one-minute from the time the steer leaves the chute
• loss of rope by either the header or the heeler
• failure of the roper on the horse being judged to catch with no more than two loops. If more than one loop is thrown, rider must recoil rope and build an additional loop.
• failure to maintain a dally through the completion of the run. The rope must be wrapped around the saddle horn at least one complete turn before it is considered a dally

The following shall be faults scored according to severity:
• jerking the reins
• slapping
• jerking the rope or any unnecessary action to enhance the performance of the horse
• turning around in the box
• turning head severely
• squatting in the corner
• incorrect position
• failure to be in correct lead before horse moves into position on the steer

RULE 19: TEAM PENNING or RANCH SORTING


A. TEAM PENNING

(a) General Rules
(1) A team of three must cut from the herd and pen three head of cattle with the assigned (same) identity number. The fastest time wins.

(2) The numbers and working order will be drawn by the judge and show management before the start of the contest.

(3) All cattle will be bunched on the cattle side of the starting line before the time begins.

(4) There shall be two flagmen, one at the entrance to the pen and one at the start/foul line. The judge must be located at the start/foul line, and may or may not actually flag the contest at his/her discretion. There shall be at least two timekeepers. The first timer shall be the official time and the second timer shall be the back-up time, in the event the first timer misses the time or his watch fails.

(5) The line flagman will raise the flag to signal when the arena is ready.

(6) Contestants will be given their cattle penning number when the line flagman drops his flag as the nose of the first horse crosses the starting line. Riders are committed once they cross the start line.

(7) Once committed to the cattle, the team is responsible for their animals. It is the team’s responsibility, before working the cattle, to pull up and call for a judge’s decision if, in their opinion, there is an injured or unusable animal in their numbered cattle. Once the cattle are worked, no excuses are accepted.

(8) A snaffle bit or hackamore may be used no matter the age of the horse and may be ridden two handed. A curb bit may be used on any age horse, but must be ridden one handed.

(b)Measurements

(1) Numbers must be minimum of 6 inches (15cm) tall. Numbers must be applied to both sides of the animal, high up on its side, with the top near the midline of the animal’s back between the shoulder and the hip.

(2) The optimum number of cattle per herd is 30; however, a maximum of 45 are allowed and a minimum of 21 per herd is required even if there are less than seven teams. All cattle within a herd must be numbered in groups of three.
(A) There must be three head of assigned (identical numbers) cattle per team in the herd as each new team begins a run.

(3) The starting and foul line must be designated by markers located on the arena fence, and easily viewed by the line judge and the exhibitors. The foul line shall be between 30 percent and 35 percent of the arena length from the cattle end of the arena, and the foul line shall be determined and advertised as such by the Event Producer. The foul line may be extended by 5 percent for each 10’ beyond 110’ in width, to accommodate bigger, wider arenas. The entry gate to the pen shall be situated 25 percent of the distance from the arena back wall, but shall not be less than 55 feet from the arena back wall.

(c)Time
(1) Show management may use 60, 75, or 90 second time limits for each division, but must advertise accordingly. Youth classes will be held using the 90-second time limit.
(2) A warning must be given to the team working the cattle at 30 seconds, prior to a final time being called.
(3) To call for time, one rider must stand in the gate and raise a hand for the flag. Flag will drop when the nose of the first horse enters the gate and the rider calls for time.
(4) Time continues until all unpenned cattle are completely on the cattle side of the starting line.

(d)Penalties - All penalties incurred will be added to a qualified run even if the penalty time exceeds time limit.

5 Second Penalty:
• per exhibitor will be assessed if the hat or helmet is not on the exhibitor’s person until completion of the run.

Rerun - No Time
• will be given if an animal is knocked or cut into the pen after time is • if an animal escapes from the pen, when team is calling for time.
• if animal escapes from the pen, when team is calling for time prior to the time when all unpenned cattle are on the cattle side of the starting line. Escaped animal is one with any part of the animal coming out of the opening of the pen.
• if team calls for time with any wrong numbered cattle in the pen.
• excessive use of a whip, rope, crop, bat or reins anywhere on the horse.
• if more than three (3) head of cattle are across the start/foul line at the same time. Any part of the fourth animal that crosses the line will invoke a no time.

Disqualification
• contact with cattle by hands, hats, ropes, bats, romal or any other equipment.
• no hazing with whips, hats or ropes allowed. Romals or reins may be swung or popped on chaps.

B. RANCH SORTING

Ranch sorting is a timed event class consisting of two riders with the objective of sorting ten head of cattle from one pen into another in a designated sequence. The team that sorts the most cattle in the correct order with the fastest time will be declared the winner. Points will be awarded based on the number of teams entered. For every five teams there will be a point awarded to each of the two winning team members.

(a) The basic concept of ranch sorting is that there are ten numbered cattle, 0-9, and two unnumbered cattle for a total 12 head at the beginning of a run behind a foul line in an arena with two people mounted on the other side of the foul line.

(b) Ranch sorting will take place between two pens of approximately equal size with the Event Producer’s option of working cattle back and forth or only one way. Two ranch sorting arenas may be placed side by side with odd numbered teams in one arena and even numbered teams in the other arena. If cattle are to be worked back and forth, they need to be moved to the opposite pen and back before each new herd entering the arena is worked. Recommended sorting area to be 50’ - 60’ in diameter with no 90 degree corners, i.e. 60’ round pen or octagonal “stop sign” design.

(c) The start foul line will be recommended as a 12’ - 16’ opening between the two pens.

(d) There will be either a 90, 75, or 60 second clock for each class, at the option of the Event Producer. The official clock is the electronic display clock and is required at all sorting shows. The official time of each run is determined by the amount of time used until all 10 cattle are sorted or the time limit has expired. Time will continue until all cattle are sorted in the correct order or the time limit is reached, either of which becomes the official time for that team.

(e) A lap timer is to be used in all sorting classes to break ties where the cattle count is equal in runs of less than 10 cattle sorted. The stop watch used for lap time purposes will also be the back-up timer in the event of a malfunction of the electronic display clock. Lap times are cumulative in multiple go round events as well as the number of cattle sorted, but do not replace the official time of each run. Lap times only come into play when the cattle counts and the official times are identical.

(f) There will be a minimum of one judge for sorting, to be positioned evenly with the foul line.
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(g) All cattle will be bunched on the cattle side of the gate within the designated area before the time begins. At the conclusion of each run, the judge will designate the need to bunch cattle.

(h) The judge will raise the flag to signal when the arena is ready. The flag will drop when the nose of the first horse crosses the start/foul line and the announcer will provide the number to be sorted first. The riders will be given their number instantly. Any delay in crossing the foul line may result in a “no-time” for the team. With particular interest, that no one or two cattle are isolated.

(i) All cattle must have approved back numbers; neck numbers are not acceptable. The cattle are sorted in order. If any part of a numbered cow crosses the start/foul line prior to its correct order, then the team receives a no-time. If any part of a sorted cow re-crosses the start/foul line the team will be disqualified. If any part of any unnumbered cow crosses the foul line before the tenth cow is cleanly sorted, it will result in a no-time.

(j) The order of sorting is determined by the picking of a random number by the announcer/timer and then that cow must be sorted first. For instance, if 5 is drawn as the first number, 5 is sorted first, then cow 6 must be sorted, 7, 8, 9, 0, 1 and so on. A cow is considered sorted when the entire cow is completely across the start/foul line.

(k) Any excessive use of a whip, rope, crop, bat or reins anywhere on the horse will be cause for disqualification.

(l) A snaffle bit or hackamore may be used no matter the age of the horse and may be ridden two handed. A curb bit may be used on any age horse, but must be ridden one handed.

(m) Exhibitor will be assessed if the hat or helmet is not on the exhibitor’s person until completion of the run.

RULE 20: WESTERN RIDING

(a) Western Riding is an event where the horse is judged on quality of gaits, lead changes at the lope, response to the rider, manners and disposition. The horse should perform with reasonable speed, and be sensible, well-mannered, free and easy moving. Extra credit should be given for and emphasis placed on smoothness, even cadence of gaits (i.e., starting and finishing pattern with the same cadence), and the horse’s ability to change leads precisely, easily and simultaneously both hind and front at the center point between markers. In order to have balance, with quality lead changes, the horse’s head and neck should be in a relaxed, natural position, with his poll level with or slightly above the level of the withers. He should not carry his head behind the vertical, giving the appearance of intimidation, or be excessively nosed out, giving a resistant appearance. The horse should have a relaxed head carriage showing response to the rider’s hands, with a moderate flexion at the poll. Horses may be ridden with light contact or on a reasonably loose rein. The horse should cross the log both at the jog and the lope without breaking gait or radically changing stride.

(b) The typical pattern:

(1) The eight small circles represent pylon markers which are recommended. These should be separated by a uniform measured distance of not less than 30 feet (9 meters) nor more than 50 feet (15 meters) on the sides with 5 markers (see diagram). In pattern one, the three markers on the opposite side should be set adjacent to the appropriate markers. It is recommended that markers be set a minimum of 15 feet (4 1/2 meters) from the fence and with 50 to 80 foot (15 to 24 meters) width in the pattern, as the arena permits.

(2) A solid log or pole should be used and be a minimum of 8 feet (2.5 meters) in length.

(3) The long serpentine line indicates the direction of travel and gaits at which the horse is to move. The shaded area represents the lead changing area between the markers. The dotted line (...) indicates walk, the dash line (- - -) jog, and the solid line ( - ) lope.

(4) A cone shall be placed along the wall or rail of the arena to designate where the exhibitor should initiate the walk. On pattern 1, the cone should be placed a minimum of 15 feet before the first pylon. On patterns 2,3,4 and 5, the cone should be placed even with the first pylon. The on-deck exhibitor should not go to the startcone until the contestant on pattern has cleared the working area by the start-cone for the final time.

(e) Scoring will be on a basis of 0-100 with 70 denoting an average performance.
(1) Scoring guidelines: points will be added or subtracted from the maneuvers on the following basis, ranging from plus 1.5 to minus 1.5: -1.5 extremely poor, -1 very poor, -.5 poor, 0 average, +.5 good, +1 very good, +1.5 excellent. Maneuver scores are to be determined independently of penalty points.

(f) A contestant shall be penalized each time the following occur:

One-half (1/2) point:
• tick or light touch of log
• hind legs skipping or coming together during lead change
• non-simultaneous lead change (Front to hind or hind to front)
• hitting or rolling log
• out of lead more than one stride either side of the center point and between the markers
• splitting the log (log between the two front or two hind feet) at the lope
• break of gait at the walk or jog up to two strides

Three (3) pointsL
• not performing the specific gait (jog or lope) or not stopping when called for in the pattern, within 10 feet (3 meters) of the designated area
• simple change of leads
• out of lead at or before the marker prior to the designated change area or out of lead at or after the marker after the designated change area
• additional lead changes anywhere in pattern (except when correcting an extra change or incorrect lead)
• in pattern one failure to start the lope within 30 feet (9 meters) after crossing the log at the jog
• break of gait at walk or jog for more than two strides
• break of gait at the lope

Five (5) points:
• out of lead beyond the next designated change area (note: failures to change, including cross-cantering. Two consecutive failures to change would result in two five point penalties).
• blatant disobedience including kicking out, biting, bucking and rearing

Disqualified - 0 score:
• illegal equipment
• willful abuse
• off course
• knocking over markers
• completely missing log
• major refusal - stop and back more than 2 strides or 4 steps with front legs
• major disobedience or schooling
• failure to start lope prior to end cone in pattern #1
• four or more simple lead changes and/or failures to change leads (Except for Novice classes)
• failure to start lope within 30 feet of designated area in patterns 2, 3, 4, 5 and Green Wes tern Riding patterns 1, 2 and 3 (except for novice classes).
• overturn of more than 1/4 turn
• faults, which will be cause for disqualification, except in novice amateur or novice youth classes, which shall be faults scored according to severity:
a. head carried too low (tip of ear below withers consistently
b. over flexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical consistently.

Credits:
• changes of leads, hind and front simultaneously
• change of lead near the center point of the lead change area
• accurate and smooth pattern
• even pace throughout
• easy to guide and control with rein and leg
• manners and disposition
• conformation and fitness

(g) The following characteristics are considered faults and should be judged accordingly in maneuver scores:
• opening mouth excessively
• anticipating signals
• stumbling
• head carried too high
• head carried too low (tip of ear below the withers)
• over-flexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
• excessive nosing out





WESTERN RIDING PATTERN I






WESTERN RIDING PATTERN I
1. Walk at least 15’ & jog over log 2. Transition to left lead & lope around end 3. First line change 4. Second line change 5. Third line change 6. Fourth line change lope around the end of arena 7. First crossing change 8. Second crossing change 9. Lope over log 10. Third crossing change 11. Fourth crossing change 12. Lope up the center, stop & back



WESTERN RIDING PATTERN II


















WESTERN RIDING PATTERN II



START CONE
1. Walk, transition to jog, jog over log 2. Transition to the lope, on the left lead 3. First crossing change 4. Second crossing change 5. Third crossing change 6. Circle & first line change 7. Second line change 8. Third line change 9. Fourth line change & circle 10. Lope over log 11. Lope, stop & back





WESTERN RIDING PATTERN III




WESTERN RIDING PATTERN III



1. Walk halfway between markers, transition to jog, jog over log 2. Transition to the lope, on the left lead 3. First crossing change 4. Lope over log 5. Second crossing change 6. First line change 7. Second line change 8. Third line change 9. Fourth line change 10. Third crossing change 11. Fourth crossing change 12. Lope up the center, stop & back











WESTERN RIDING PATTERN IV






WESTERN RIDING PATTERN IV START CONE
1. Walk, transition to jog, jog over log 2. Transition to the lope, on the right lead 3. First line change 4. Second line change 5. Third line change 6. Fourth line change 7. First crossing change 8. Second crossing change 9. Third crossing change 10. Lope over log 11. Lope, Stop & back





RULE 21: REINING Reining is liken to dressage in theory with the judging based on the execution of a pattern and different levels of competition according to the horse's experience. The horse is judged on smoothness of the performance, finesse, attitude and authority of performing various maneuvers while using a controlled speed. The moves in the pattern include sliding stops, spins, flying lead changes, loping circles, then hesitates and backs. The lope is the ONLY gait performed while on the pattern and any breaking of the gait is a disqualification. It is important to note that judging starts at the moment that the entrant enters the arena. The horse may walk or trot to the starting point of the pattern. An entry could be shown in which the horse that has completed the pattern is walking or trotting toward the judge for the required drop bridle. Also, please note that during the patterns themselves, that the horse may run, lope, slide, spin, hesitate, back.

(a) To rein a horse is not only to guide him, but also to control his every movement. The best reined horse should be willingly guided or controlled with little or no apparent resistance and dictated to completely. Any movement on his own must be considered a lack of control. All deviations from the exact written pattern must be considered a lack of or temporary loss of control, and therefore faulted according to severity of deviation. Credit will be given for smoothness, finesse, attitude, quickness and authority in performing the various maneuvers while using controlled speed.

(b) The following will result in no score:
   (1) Use of illegal equipment or illegal bits, bosals or curb chains; when using a snaffle bit, optional curb strap is acceptable; however, curb chains are not acceptable.
   (2) Use of tack collars, tie dow
   (3) Use of whips or bats
   (4) Closed reins are not allowed except as standard romal reins.
   (5) Excess rein may be straightened at any place a horse is allowed to be completely stopped during a pattern; rider’s free hand may be used to hold romal in the normal fashion.
   (6) The following will result in a score of 0:
      (1)Use of more than index or first finger between reins
      (2)Use of two hands (exception in Junior, Snaffle Bit, or Hackamore classes designated for two hands) or changing hands
      (3)Failure to complete pattern as written
      (4)Performing the maneuvers other than in specified order
      (5) The inclusion of maneuvers not specified, including, but not limited to:
           (A)Backing more than 2 strides
           (B)Turning more than 90 degrees
      (6) Equipment failure that delays completion of pattern; including dropping a rein that contacts the ground while horse is in motion.
      (7) Balking or refusal of command where performance is delayed
      (8) Running away or failing to guide where it becomes impossible to discern whether the entry is on pattern
      (9) Jogging in excess of one-half circle or one-half the length of the arena
      (10) Overspins of more than 1/4 turn
      (11) Fall to the ground by horse or rider

(c) The following will result in a reduction of five points:
(1)Spurring in front of cinch
(2)Use of either hand to instill fear or praise
(3)Holding saddle with either hand
(4)Blatant disobediences including kicking, biting bucking, rearing and striking.

(d) The following will result in a reduction of two points:
(1) Break of gait
(2) Freeze up in spins or rollbacks
(3) On walk-in patterns, failure to stop or walk before executing a canter departure.
(4) On run-in patterns, failure to be in a canter prior to the first marker.
(5) If a horse does not completely pass the specified marker before initiating a stop position.
(6)Starting or performing circles or eights out of lead
(7)Starting circle at a jog or exiting rollbacks at a jog.
(8)To remain a minimum of 20 feet (6 meters) from the wall or fence when approaching a stop and/or rollback.
(8)In patterns requiring a run-around, failure to be on the correct lead when rounding the end of the arena will be penalized

(e)Faults against the horse to be scored accordingly, but not to cause disqualification:
   (1)Opening mouth excessively when wearing bit
   (2)Excessive jawing, opening mouth or head raising on stop
   (3)Lack of smooth, straight stop on haunches-bouncing or sideways stop
   (4)Refusing to change leads
   (5)Anticipating signals
   (6)Stumbling
   (7)Backing sideways
   (8)Knocking over markers

(f)Faults against the rider to be scored accordingly, but not to cause disqualification:
   (1)Losing stirrup
   (2)Failure to run circles or figure eights within the markers is not considered a fault depending on arena conditions and size; however, failure to go beyond markers on rollbacks and stops is considered a fault.

(g)While horse is in motion, rider’s hands shall be clear of horse and saddle.





REINING PATTERN NUMBER 1






  1. Run at speed to the far end of the arena past the end marker and do a left rollback with no hesitation.

  2. Run to the opposite end of the arena past the end marker and do a right rollback with no hesitation.

  3. Run past the center marker and do a sliding stop. Back up to center of the arena or at least 10 feet (3 meters). Hesitate.

  4. Complete four spins to the right.

  5. Complete four and one-quarter spins to the left so that horse is facing left wall or fence. Hesitate.

  6. Beginning on the left lead, complete three circles to the left: the first circle large and fast; the second circle small and slow; the third circle large and fast. Change leads at the center of the arena.

  7. Complete three circles to the right: the first circle large and fast; the second circle small and slow; the third circle large and fast. Change leads at the center of the arena.

  8. Begin a large fast circle to the left but do not close this circle. Run straight up the right side of the arena past the center marker and do a sliding stop at least 20 feet (6 meters) from wall or fence. Hesitate to demonstrate the completion of the pattern.



REINING PATTERN NUMBER 2








Horse must walk or stop prior to starting this pattern.

Begin at the center of the arena facing the left wall or fence.

  1. Beginning on the right lead, complete three circles to the right: the first circle small and slow; the next two circles large and fast. Change leads at the center of the arena.

  2. Complete three circles to the left: the first circle small and slow; the next two circles large and fast. Change leads at the center of the arena.

  3. Continue around previous circle to the right. At the top of the circle, run down the middle to the far end of the arena past the end marker and do a right rollback with no hesitation.

  4. Run up the middle to the opposite end of the arena past the end marker and do a left rollback with no hesitation.

  5. Run past the center marker and do a sliding stop. Back up to the center of the arena or at least 10 feet (3 meters). Hesitate.

  6. Complete four spins to the right.

  7. Complete four spins to the left. Hesitate to demonstrate the completion of the pattern.

Rider may drop bridle to the designated judge.





REINING PATTERN NUMBER 3






Horse must walk or stop prior to starting pattern. Beginning at the center of the arena facing the left wall or fence. 1. Beginning on the right lead, complete three circles to the right: the first two circles large and fast; the third circle small and slow. Stop at the center of the arena. 2. Complete four spins to the right. Hesitate. 3. Beginning on the left lead, complete three circles to the left: the first two circles large and fast; the third circle small and slow. Stop at the center of the arena. 4. Complete four spins to the left. Hesitate. 5. Beginning on the right lead, run a large fast circle to the right, change leads at the center of the arena, run a large fast circle to the left, and change leads at the center of the arena. 6. Continue around previous circle to the right. At the top of the circle, run down the middle to the far end of the arena past the end marker and do a right rollback - no hesitation. 7. Run up the middle to the opposite end of the arena past the end marker and do a left rollback - no hesitation. 8. Run past the center marker and do a sliding stop. Back up to the center of the arena or at least 10 feet (3 meters). Hesitate to demonstrate completion of the pattern. Rider may drop bridle to the designated judge.



REINING PATTERN NUMBER 4








  1. Run at speed to the far end of the arena past the end marker and do a left rollback with no hesitation.

  2. Run to the opposite end of the arena past the end marker and do a right rollback with no hesitation.

  3. Run past the center marker and do a sliding stop. Back up to the center of the arena or at least 10 feet (3 meters). Hesitate.

  4. Complete four spins to the right.

  5. Complete four and one-quarter spins to the left so that horse is facing left wall or fence. Hesitate.

  6. Beginning on the right lead, complete three circles to the right: the first two circles large and fast; the third circle small and slow. Change leads at the center of the arena.

  7. Complete three circles to the left: the first two circles large and fast; the third circle small and slow. Change leads at the center of the arena.

  8. Begin a large fast circle to the right but do not close this circle. Run straight down the right side of the arena past the center marker and do a sliding stop at least 20 feet (6 meters) from the wall or fence. Hesitate to demonstrate completion of the pattern.



Rider may drop bridle to the designated judge.



REINING PATTERN NUMBER 5












  1. Run past the center marker and do a sliding stop. Back up to the center of the arena or at least 10 feet (3 meters). Hesitate.

  2. Complete four spins to the right.

  3. Complete four and one-quarter spins to the left so that the horse is facing the left wall or fence. Hesitate.

  4. Beginning on the right lead, complete three circles to the right: the first two circles large and fast, the third circle small and slow. Change leads at the center of the arena.

  5. Complete three circles to the left: the first circle small and slow, the next two circles large and fast. Change leads at the center of the arena.

  6. Begin a large fast circle to the right but do not close this circle. Run down the right side of the arena past the marker and do a left rollback at least 20 feet (6 meters) from the wall or fence with no hesitation.

  7. Continue back around the previous circle but do not close this circle. Run down the left side of the arena past the center and do a right rollback at least 20 feet (6 meters) from the wall or fence with no hesitation.

  8. Continue back around previous circle but do not close this circle. Run down the right side of the arena past the center marker and do a sliding stop at least 20 feet (6 meters) from the wall or fence. Hesitate to demonstrate completion of the pattern.



Rider may drop bridle to the designated judge.



RULE 22: REINED COW HORSE

(a) Both the cow work portion of this event and the reined work portion are mandatory. Scoring emphasis on the cow work portion shall be based on the horse maintaining control of the cow at all times, exhibiting superior cow sense and natural cow working ability without excessive reining or spurring. The greater the difficulty of the run, the more credit should be given. The difficulty may be due to the extreme speed or stubbornness of the cow, or the cow’s reluctance to move down the fence when sufficiently driven by the contestant. The most controlled cow work with the highest degree of difficulty should be marked the highest. Failure of an exhibitor to attempt to complete the cow work portion of the class, as well as the reined work, will result in the exhibitor not being considered an entry in the class. A horse that attempts to complete the cow work and has not been disqualified will be scored accordingly at the judge’s discretion. A horse going off pattern in the reined work will receive a score of zero. A horse that attempts both the reined work and the cow work portion may be placed, even if disqualified in one portion of the class. (Example: If a horse is disqualified and receives a 0 score for the reined work, but scores a 70 for the cow work, its total score would be a 70 and the horse would be eligible for placing.) However, the fall of a horse and rider being judged shall be cause for disqualification and not eligible to be placed.

(b) The approved pattern will be used and each contestant will cause his horse to travel at the gait indicated for each part of the pattern. When judging reined work, the judge should refer to the reining portion of the handbook for guidelines.

(c) For an ideal cow work, each contestant, upon receiving a cow in the arena, shall hold the cow on the prescribed end of the arena for sufficient time to demonstrate the ability of the horse to contain the cow on that end. After a reasonable amount of time, the contestant shall take the cow down the fence, making at least one turn each way on the fence. The contestant shall then take the cow to an open part of the arena and circle it at least once in each direction. The required pattern for the cow work is boxing, fence turns and circles, in that order.

(d) The cow must always yield to the horse

(e) The following characteristics of the horse are considered faults:
(1) Exaggerated opening of mouth
(2) Hard or heavy mouth
(3) Nervous throwing of head
(4) Lugging on bridle
(5) Halting or hesitation while being shown, particularly when being run out, indicating anticipation of being set up
(6) Losing a cow or being unable to finish a pattern because of a bad cow, the contestant should be penalized at the judge’s discretion
(7) Touching the horse or saddle with the free hand except during the cow work portion of the class, where the rider may hold onto the horn.
(k) The characteristics of a good working cow horse are:
   (1) Good manners
   (2) Shifty, smooth and having its feet under it at all times when stopping, hind feet should be well under it
   (3) A soft mouth and should respond to a light rein, especially when turning
   (4) Head should be maintained in its natural position
   (5) Work at reasonable speed and still be under control of the rider.

f Point Penalties:
• Horse runs past the cow; when the horse’s buttocks pass the cow’s head, the horse is considered past the cow.
• Failure to drive cow past middle marker on first turn before turning cow
• The arena may not be crossed to use the opposite fence to achieve a turn
• Using the corner or the end of the arena to turn the cow when going down the fence
• Slipping a rein
• Excessive whipping, or spurring
• On trot-in patterns, failure to stop before executing a canter departure.
• Biting or striking the cow
• Spurring or use of the romal forward of the cinch
• Any blatant disobedience of horse

Disqualified 0 - Score
• Fingers between the reins
• Any horse that is out of control while working the cow, thus endangering the rider (i.e. Crossing the path of the cow) or any horse that runs over the cow thus causing the fall of horse and/or rider
• Schooling between rein work and cow work. (Schooling is defined as gaining an advantage by excessive pulling, turning, stopping or backing.)
• During the cow work, use of two hands on the reins, except with junior horses ridden two-handed in a bosal or snaffle bit.
g There are a multitude of patterns in AQHA or NCHA rulebooks but due to space limitations IMEHA will list these following 5 patterns. You may go to other rulebooks to list a different pattern if you wish for reference.

REINED COWHORSE PATTERN I




REINED COWHORSE PATTERN I

  1. Start at end of arena. Run down middle past center marker to a sliding stop.
  2. Back at least 10 feet to center. 1/4 turn to left.
  3. Pick up right lead, large fast circle, small slow circle.
  4. Change leads to left, large fast circle, small slow circle.
  5. Change leads to right, do not close this circle.
  6. Run around end of arena and down the side (approximately 20 feet from fence) past center marker and come to a sliding stop.
  7. Complete 3 1/2 spins to the right.
  8. Continue back down side and end of arena to other side (approximately 20 feet from fence) go past center marker and come to a sliding stop.
  9. Complete 3 1/2 spins to the left.
  10. Hesitate to complete pattern.


REINED COWHORSE PATTERN II




REINED COW HORSE PATTERN II
Left Lead Start
Mandatory Marker Along Fence or Wall Trot to center of arena and stop. Start pattern facing toward judge.
  1. Pick up left lead, complete three circles to the left. The first one large and fast, the second small and slow, the third large and fast.
  2. Change leads at center of arena.
  3. Complete three circles to the right. The first one large and fast, the second small and slow, the third large and fast.
  4. Change leads at center of arena.
  5. Do not stop, continue on to run downs.
  6. Run to far end past the marker to a sliding stop. Hesitate
  7. Complete 3 1/2 spins to the left. Hesitate.
  8. Run to far end past the marker to a sliding stop. Hesitate
  9. Complete 3 1/2 spins to the right. Hesitate.
  10. Run past center marker to a sliding stop. Hesitate.
  11. Back at least 10 feet in a straight line. Hesitate
  12. Hesitate to complete pattern.


REINED COW HORSE PATTERN II Right Lead Start
Mandatory Marker Along Fence or Wall Trot to center of arena and stop. Start pattern facing toward judge.
  1. Begin on right lead and complete three circles to right, two large fast circles followed by one small slow circle, change to left lead.
  2. Complete three circles to left, two large, fast circles followed by one small slow circle. Change to right lead.
  3. Continue loping around end of arena without breaking gait.
  4. Run up center of arena to far end past the end marker and come to a sliding stop.
  5. Complete 2 1/2 spins to the right.
  6. Run up center of arena past the end marker, come to a sliding stop.
  7. Complete 2 1/2 spins to the left.
  8. Run back to middle of the arena past the center marker and come to a sliding stop.
  9. Back at least 10 feet in a straight line.
  10. Hesitate to complete pattern.


REINED COW HORSE PATTERN III




REINED COW HORSE PATTERN III
  1. Start at end of arena.
  2. Run up center of arena past the end marker and come to a sliding stop. Complete 2 1/2 spins to the left.
  3. Run to other end of arena past the end marker and stop. Complete 2 1/2 spins to the right.
  4. Run past the center marker and stop.
  5. Back at least 10 feet in a straight line.
  6. Complete 1/4 turn to the left, hesitate. Begin on right lead. Circle to the right. Complete two circles to the right, the first one small and slow and the second large and fast. Change leads at the center of the arena.
  7. Complete one small, slow circle and one large, fast circle. Change leads to the right.
  8. Run around end of arena to the other side, past the center marker, at least 20 feet from fence and come to a sliding stop.
  9. Hesitate to complete pattern.


REINED COW HORSE PATTERN IV




REINED COW HORSE PATTERN IV

  1. Start at end of arena.
  2. Run up center of arena past the end marker and come to a sliding stop. Complete 2 1/2 spins to the left.
  3. Run to other end of arena past the end marker and stop. Complete 2 1/2 spins to the right.
  4. Run past the center marker and stop.
  5. Back at least 10 feet in a straight line.
  6. Complete 1/4 turn to the left, hesitate. Begin on right lead. Circle to the right. Complete two circles to the right, the first one small and slow and the second large and fast. Change leads at the center of the arena.
  7. Complete one small, slow circle and one large, fast circle. Change leads to the right.
  8. Run around end of arena to the other side, past the center marker, at least 20 feet from fence and come to a sliding stop.
  9. Hesitate to complete pattern.


REINED COW HORSE PATTERN IV




REINED COW HORSE PATTERN V This pattern works best when the exhibitor and cattle enter from the same end of arena.

  1. Start at end of arena.
  2. Run past the center marker and stop.
  3. Back up at least 10 feet.
  4. Complete 1/4 turn to the left.
  5. Complete 2 circles to the left, the first one large and fast and the second small and slow. Change leads at the center of the arena.
  6. Complete two circles to the right, the first one small and slow, the second large and fast. Change leads at the center of the arena.
  7. Continue around end of arena without breaking gait or changing leads, run down center of arena past end marker, come to a square sliding stop.
  8. Complete 3 1/2 spins to the right.
  9. Run down center of arena past end marker and come to a square sliding stop.
  10. Complete 3 1/2 spins to the left.
  11. Hesitate to complete pattern.


RULE 23: BARREL RACING.

Barrel racing is a timed event.

(a) The course must be measured exactly according to diagram and cannot exceed these dimensions. However, if the course is too large for the available space, the pattern should be reduced five yards at a time until the pattern fits the arena. Adequate space must remain between barrels and any obstacle. The distance from barrel number three to the finish line need not be reduced five yards (4.6 meters) at a time if there is sufficient room for the horse to stop. When measuring the area for the barrel course, allow ample room for horses to complete their turns and stop at the finish. It is recommended there be at least 45 feet (13.5 meters) from the starting line to the end of the arena, at least 18 feet (5.4 meters) from barrels 1 and 2 to the fence and 36 feet (10.8 meters) from barrel 3 to the end of the arena.

(b) Brightly colored 55 gallon (200 liters) steel drums with both ends in must be used. There shall be no rubber or plastic barrels or barrel pads used. Using campbells soups cans are very close to scale for traditional models. But they very needs to be painted rather to to leave them are just silver cans

(c) Starting line markers or electric timers, when possible, shall be placed against the arena fence. Reference can be made to the real electric timer used.

(d) Timing begind as soon as the horse’s nose reaches the starting line and stops when the horse’s nose passes over the finish line. So these are fine to recreate reference to

(e) The contestant is allowed a running start. At a signal from the starter, the contestant will run to barrel number 1, pass to the left of it, and complete an approximately 360 degree turn around it; then go to barrel number 2, pass to the right of it, and complete a slightly more than 360 degree turn around it; then go to barrel number 3, pass to the right of it, and do another approximately 360 degree turn around it; then sprint to the finish line, passing between barrel number 1 and 2. This barrel course may also be run to the left. For example, the contestants will start to barrel number 2, turning to left around this barrel, then to barrel number 1, turning to the right, then to barrel number 3, turning again to the right, followed by the final sprint to the finish line.

(f) Knocking over a barrel carries a penalty. Failure to follow the course shall cause disqualification. A contestant may touch the barrel with his or her hands in barrel racing.

(g) A penalty will be assessed if the hat or helmet is not on the exhibitor's person for the entire time the exhibitor is in the arena in barrel racing.




RULE 24: POLE BENDING.


Pole bending is a timed event.

(a) The pattern begins by each contestant will begin from a running start, and time shall begin and end as the horse’s nose crosses the line. A clearly visible starting line must be provided. An electric timer may be recreated by using a prop. The entry may recreate any part of the pattern.

(b) The pole bending pattern is to be run around six poles. Each pole is to be 21 feet (6.4 meters) apart, and the first pole is to be 21 feet (6.4 meters) from the starting line. Poles shall be set on top of the ground, six feet (1.8 meters) in height, with no base more than 14 inches (35 cm) in diameter.

(c) A horse may start either to the right or to the left of the first pole and then run the remainder of the pattern accordingly.

(d) Knocking over a pole shall carry a five-second penalty. Failure to follow the course shall cause disqualification. A contestant may touch a pole with his or her hand in pole bending.

(e) Hat or helmet must stay on exhibitor the entire time the exhibitor is in the arena in pole bending.

(f) The judge must disqualify any contestant for excessive use of a whip, rope, crop, bat or reins anywhere on the horse.




RULE 25: EXTREME COWBOY RACE

1)A score is given for each obstacle on the course. A score is also given for overall horsemanship and speed.

2)Each obstacle consist of 3 components: the Approach to the obstacle, the Obstacle itself and the Departure from the obstacle.

3)Each obstacle may consists of a maneuver similar to reining or the negotiating of an obstacle similar to a trail riding event.

Be sure that if your entry is a
maneuver eligible in trail or a
maneuver
eligible for reining that you do not cross enter it into Extreme Cowboy Race. Only one performance event per photo is allowed.

List of Maneuvers for Extreme Cowboy Race: Backing
Backing - Down Hill
Backing - Up Hill
Circles big and small-slow and fast
Doubling (Turning) into Fence
Roll backs
Serpentine Through a Pattern
Side Pass (logs, ground poles or panels)
Spin

List of Obstacles for Extreme Cowboy Race:
Archery shoot
Bareback Double Rider
Barrel/PVC Jumps
Barrel Turns
Blindfold and Lead Your Horse
Branding-Chalk
Carry Saddlebags
Climb Wind Mill-Ring Bell
Cow Sort
Cowboy Curtain
Daisy Chain
Dead Fall
Flag Race
Flares and smoke
Free Ride
Ground tie
Hay carry
Hay Maze
Hay Ring
Key Hole
Lead Across a Water Obstacle
Leading Horse-From Ground
Log Crossing
Log Pull
Mail Box
Move golf ball from on a cone to another cone
Narrow Bridge
Open and Close Gate (rope gate or regular gate)
Pallet Pull (Controlled)
Pick up Horses Feet
Pony or Leading a Second Horse
Put on Easy Boots and Then Ride
Ravine Ride-deep or shallow
Ride Through Round Bales and Road Flashers
Slicker or Tarp Carry
Spearing Stationary Rings
Stand Up in Saddle-hit tennis ball
Step-down or up
Stops
Tarp -drag-carry-ride over
Teeter Totter Bridge
Trailer Load
Trash Ride (trash between two panels)
Tunnel
Tunnel Run
Water Box
Water Carry
Water crossing (shallow or deep)
Waterfall
Water Sprinkler
Zig Zag



RULE 26: COWBOY ACTION NOUNTED SHOOTING

SASS DRESS REQUIREMENTS F
OR COMPETITORS

Shirts and Blouses:
Long sleeve traditional western design may include snap, button shirts, button up, lace up, smiley pockets, shield shirts, plaid shirts, denim shirts, leather shirts. Shirts may have appliqué, fringe, piping, embroidery, or different colored yokes. Sleeves may be rolled up to the forearm. Ladies may wear short sleeve western cowgirl or Victorian style shirt, peasant blouse, camisole.

Pants and Skirts:
Traditional styled western pants. Jeans may be worn but must be worn with chaps or chinks over them. Ladies may wear split riding skirts, full-length dress or Victorianstyled long formal dress, Spanish, Indian style, or saloon girl dress is appropriate. Dresses may be short sleeve or sleeveless.

Headwear:
Headwear shall be worn during competition for the entire match. Headwear may include western style felt cowboy hat, cavalry style felt hat, Victorian or other ladies hat, veil, ribbon, bow, feather, or other appropriate hair ornamentation to complete a look; Mexican style sombrero of felt or straw, Native American style headband with feathers, or protective headwear.

Footwear:
Boots may be lace up or pull on and must be a traditional design of leather or leather looking material; moccasins or military style boots must be of leather or leather looking material. Ladies may also wear Victorian style shoes or lace up shoes. They must be of leather (leather looking material), silk, or brocade fabric.

Accoutrements:
Accoutrements are strongly encouraged. They may include, but are not limited to the following:
gloves or gauntlets, scarves with slides or tied around the neck, coat, jacket, vest, frock coats, dusters, chaps, cuffs, belts or buckles, period watch, hat bands, sleeve garters, knife in sheath, botas, leggings, suspenders, or sashes. Ladies may also wear period jewelry, period hair ornaments, snood, feather boa, cape, sashes, stockings, bustle, hoop, and corset.

OUTLAWED
The use or presence of any outlawed item is a Stage Disqualification.
• Short sleeve shirts (Male competitors only)
• Hip-hugger or designer jeans
bull; Short sleeve tee shirts, long sleeve tee shirts, and tank tops for all competitors. Long sleeve Henley type shirts with buttons are acceptable.
• Spandex or other modern body-hugging material, fitted tops.
• Modern feathered cowboy hats (Shady Brady). Straw hats of traditional design Stetson, Bailey, sombreros,) acceptable.
• Ball caps
• All types of athletic shoes or combat boots, no matter the material from which they are constructed
• Nylon, plastic, or Velcro accouterments.
• Promotional or sponsor’s logos on tack or clothing are forbidden. Manufacturer’s clothing labels are acceptable.

FIREARMS
Each contestant shall be armed with two revolvers. Only fixed sight single action of .45 Long Colt caliber, designed prior to 1898, or reproductions thereof, are allowed.
Examples of these revolvers include Colt Single Action Army and Bisley Models, Smith & Wesson Schofield and Russian, Remington Models 1875 and 1890, and Ruger Vaqueros and Montados.

GUN LEATHER
Each rider will need a belt and two holsters. Most competitors use one holster on their strong side and a cross-draw on their off side, allowing them to shoot
both revolvers with their strong hand without shifting the reins from one hand to the other. It is permissible to mount holsters on the saddle. All holsters must be of leather construction and must securely retain the contestant’s firearms throughout the strenuous range of motion required in mounted competition. Holsters should conform to historic Old West designs. A holster is defined as a leather pouch formed in the shape of a revolver. A feedbag or saddlebag does not qualify and is considered to be unsafe. Holsters are limited to belted holsters, pommel, cantle, and/or shoulder holsters.

HORSES
SASS Mounted Shooting competition is open to any horse or mule, registered or grade. A competitor must use the same horse throughout the entire match.

SADDLES AND TACK Contestants are encouraged to use period saddles of an early western design, such as slickforks, Hope Tree, Mother Hubbard, or McClellan. However, one may compete with any saddle as long as it is constructed of traditional materials (leather) and is in safe condition.
Headstalls, tie-downs, reins, and breast collars must be of leather construction.
The idea is to present a picture “out of the past” of the mount and rider. Modern neoprene and fleece lined cinches, nylon latigos and billets, shin, skid, and bell boots, while not encouraged, are acceptable as long as they are of neutral earth tones and do not blatantly change the overall traditional appearance of the competitor’s rig. Contestants may use any bit or hackamore to reasonably control their mount as long as it is not overly severe in design. Tack may not display any visible advertisements or endorsements, including logos.

TARGETS and EQUIPMENT
The standard targets used in SASS Mounted Shooting competitions are helium quality balloons. When inflated correctly, a target will measure six to nine inches in diameter. Care is taken to make sure targets are of uniform size for all competitors. Targets shall be of two distinctly different colors; it makes. For safety reasons target stands should be made of a flexible material like PVC or polyethylene pipe no larger than 3/4 inch in diameter. A simple 1-1/2 inch vertical hacksaw cut in the top of the pipe provides an excellent way to fasten targets to the target pole. Simply tie off the neck of the balloon, stretch it, and slip it into the saw cut. Standard target poles should be 48 inches high, but can be varied from ground level to 60 inches to add variety to each stage. Traffic cones make excellent, safe bases for target poles.

STAGE DESIGN
A standard Mounted Shooting stage has ten targets. A contestant engages the course of fire with two single action revolvers loaded with five approved cartridges. Revolvers are used one at a time. With the first revolver, a contestant engages the first designated course of fire(the first half of the stage). Upon completing the first half of the course, the contestant shall holster the now empty revolver and draw the second revolver and ride to engage the second half of the stage. There shall be no running starts into the arena. All riders shall start a stage with the gate closed. It is required all barrels be plastic and closed at both ends. They may not be closer than 25 feet to the arena side rails and 25 feet to the end rail, and targets shall be set at lease 30 feet from the side and end rails. After completing the stage, the contestant shall immediately report to the Armorer, who will unload both revolvers.

Penalties
• Missed target
• Knocked over barrel
• Knocked over mandatory gate or cone
• A dropped revolver after engaging the stage
• Failure to holster first revolver
• Twirling of revolver
• Failure to engage target
• Failure to follow pattern
• Deliberate bypassing a target to gain unfair advantage
• Knocking over rails, panel, structures, or other devices intended for controlling rider and horse

Stage Disqualification
• Failure to follow SASS clothing requirements
• A rider loads or shoots six rounds from the same revolver in a stage
• Becoming dismounted during a stage or otherwise not completing a stage
• Accidental discharge outside of the arena before or after a run
• Failure to follow loading / unloading rules
• Crossing timer beam before finishing stage
• A cart accident, broken cart parts (where stage cannot be safely completed), or contestant falls out of cart after engaging stage

RULE 27: OTHER GYMKHANA EVENTS Typically a light weight western saddle of barrel-racing style with small, rounded skirts and breast collar. However any style Western saddle allowed. Bridle can be mechincal hackamore, hackamore bosal or any style bridle and bit with equipment at rider's choice with roping or closed reins. Leg protection commonly seen. Tied downs are allowed. Riders usually dress in flashly western style clothing but levis and shirts are required. Hats for adults and helmets for children.

A) Western Other Gymkhana Speed - Timed Games
IMEHA Defination of a Speed or Timed Event is when the horse and rider are competing against a clock and are the only entry in the arena during their performance. Or may be a pair of riders racing against each other in heats with fastest rider advancing to a final heat.

These are a few examples of Western Other Gymkhana Speed - Timed Games. Meaning the winners with the fastest time normally win. There are many others that you may use. Just be sure to add a comment line with description of the activity and any reference links if you have one.

Apple Bob:
Three styles of this event are note. Rider either rides to where a container of apples are placed in water and then (while mounted) reachs in the container and get a good bite on the apple, retrieves it and ride back to finish while holding apple in their mouth. The other is to dismount and bite the apple and then either remount and ride back or stay grounded a lead back the horse to finish line. Consideration as to age of rider and ability to mount and dismount are taken into consideration.

Balloon Race:
The rider carries several balloons in a cluster that are weighed at the base of the string. Rider tries to drop weighted ballons in the bucket without spooking the horse. Variations of this race is to add obstalce to maneuver such as ground poles or back thru poles. Bucket is typically set up at riders knee height such as a barrel top.

Barrel Crawl:
A timed race to end of arena where rider dismounts and crawls through a barrel remounts and return to finish line.

Beer Can or Soda Can Stack:
ider races from a starting line to a barrel and stop long enough to place one beer or soda can on the top of an already stacked pile of cans. Rider places a can so that it stays and then turn around the barrel and races back to finish line. Pile of cans are the same number for each entrant to be fair so an attendant must be present to adjust the stack for each entrant.

Cow Hide Race:
Rider ties a cow hide with lariat to one end, dallies to horn and drags the hide with rider aboard the hide back to the finish line. Usually done in pairs.

Flag Race:
There are two barrels but both at one end of the arena, one is on the left side (with about 15ft or more to the fence) the other on the right (same distance) the flag is in a bucket of sand on one side or the other of the arena. A bucket full of sand but no flag is on the opposite barrel. The point is to run (or walk) down the arena pick up the flag on your way by put it into the empty bucket and run (or walk) back to the line. There are time penalties for missed buckets or knocked over barrels.

Fox and Hound:
A cloverleaf style barrel race but with two riders and two horses. The first horse leads and the second horse follows. Disqualification if second horse passes before the front of cinch before the first horse finishes the course.

Izzy Dizzy:
Run down to a bat do 15 circles with forehead on bat and bat and ground get back on your horse and race back to finish line with fastest time the winner.

Keyhole:
A 20 feet in diameter circle with a 4' wide x 10' long neck in drawn in the arena with lime or chalk powder. The starting line is 50 to 100 feet according to arena and or associations from the entrance of the keyhole. Time starts as contestant crosses the starting line and runs to through entrance of keyhole, stopping within the confines of the circle. They may turn right or left in the circle. return to the entrance of the keyhole and run through it and back to finish line. Sets of markers are used at both start and finish lines and the horse must pass between both markers in order of their time to be valid.

Nez Perce Stake Race:
Similar to pole bending but horses compete in pairs and in heats until a winner is chosen. The course is done in a mirror fashion with a common finish line.

Pickup & Ride or Rescue Race:
A timed race to end of arena, around a barrel pickup a rider and return.

Rope Race:
Four foot ropes are loosely tied to a wire line or a lariat and strung across the arena about 2 feet higher than an average rider's head while mounted on horseback. Heats are suggested to have no more than 8 horses but not a requirement. Heats are conducted like musical chairs in which for example if there are 8 horse 7 ropes are tied until there is only one horse left.

Sack Race:
Two riders dismount and putting one leg in a large feed or gunny sack they race while leading their horses down to a finish line. A variation is when after reaching the line at one when of arena the team mount (usually each other's horses) and race back to other end of arena to a finish line.

Steer Daubing:
Rider uses a "lance" to mark the steer within a circle painted on the steer's side. The circles are painted on both sides of a steer and are 16 to 20 inches in diameter. The lance is approximately 6' long and is padded at one end and soaked in a washable paint or white wash. The horse and rider are placed behind a barrier, usually the calf roping chute and a steer is releashed at the rider's signal. The rider has a 1 minute time limit after steer breaks the barrier to prevent needless chasing of the steer.

Stump Race:
Cloverleaf style barrel race with twin course and two horses competing against each other. The course is done in a mirror fashion with a common finish line. Course is larger than normal cloverleaf barrels with front barrel 30 feet from finish line, barrels 75 feet apart and back barrel 94 feet from finish line. First horse from the competing pair to cross finish line wins the heat and goes on to compete in subsequence heats until a final winner is chosen.

B) Western Other Gymkhana Speed - Non Timed Game
IMEHA Defination of a Non Timed Event is when the horse and rider are competing against others in the class and must cross a finish line first to win the class.

These are a few examples of Western Other Gymkhana Speed - Non Timed Games. This games are not timed. There are many others that you may use. Just be sure to add a comment line with description of the activity and any reference links if you have one.

Bareback Dollar Bill or Sit A Buck:
Riders ride without a saddle and sitting on a dollar bill throughout a rail class called by a judge. Usual gaits are the same as Western Bareback Equitation classes. Riders with a dollar bill under them when the line up is called in are the ones placed. Judged on equitation and rather or not they kept their seats long enough to hold the dollar bill in place. Rider normally get to keep the dollar as an award along with ribbon of placement based on equitation.

Boot Race:
A timed Race where boots are piled together at one end of the arena and the entrants ride to the pile from the stating line where the rider dismounts finds their boots, put them on and leads their horse back to the start. (trick class - the show staff filled your boots with rocks!)

Catalog Race:
The announcer gives each rider a page number. Entrants run to barrel at end of arena, find page number tear out and race back with the fastest time and correct page number wins.

Champagne Glass:
Riders are given a champagne glass filled with fluid at one end of arena and must ride back to other end of arena with fluid still in the glass. Fastest time with most fluid in glass wins.

Cowboy or Push Polo:
In Cowboy Polo riders use a mallet like in polo. In Push Polo riders try to get their horses to push the ball through the cone goals. Team that scores the most goals within set time win.

Diaper Race:
Team of two riders riding double; in a row of ten riders; run down. One is the 'baby' and the other is the mother. Mother puts on the diaper on the 'baby' and put on a cloth diaper and both get back on horse. First pair that corsses finish line with diaper correctly on 'baby' wins.

Egg & Spoon:
Riders are given an egg and large soup spoon at one end of arena and must ride back to other end of arena with the egg still sitting in the spoon. The person that crosses the finish line first with an egg still in spoon wins.

Hat Race:
In theory as boot race but using hats instread of boots.

Musical Stalls:
Ground poles are laid out in connecting stall fashion. Horse and rider must be in a 'stall' when the music goes off. Ground poles are removed per stall for each go around until there is only one winner left.

Relay Races:
Riders entered divide into two teams. Each team as a crop or some item to use as a 'handoff'. Riders race a course made of manevuers such as serpentines, quarter turns, half turns, etc. The riders ride through the course away from their team and then canter back (without going through course a second time unless you may want to call for running the course backwards which is really funny to watch).

Relay Obstacle Races:
Same type of course as listed above in Relay Race but ostacles that can be cantered over such as those seen in trail class are added. Riders entered divide into two teams. Each team as a crop or some item to use as a 'handoff'. Riders race a course made of manevuers over the obstacles. The riders ride through the course away from their team and then canter back (without going through course a second time unless you may want to call for running the course backwards which is really funny to watch).

Ribbon Pairs:
Two riders walk, trot, and canter holding a ribbon between them. The last pair holding the ribbon wins. A timed race where all the entrant's saddles and saddle pads are piled in a line and the rider rides bareback from a starting line to where the saddles are lined up. They then dismount, saddle the horse and ride back to finish line.

Simon Says or Command:
"Simon" gives equitation commands and the riders must do it immediately. A top judge asks for the hard ones like, 'perform a 180 degree turn away from rail on the forequarter.' Or, 'Turn horse in toward center of arena go 6 strides and then back 6 strides and turn reverse direction on rail.' Announcer or judge who is calling commands must speak clearly and quickly. Riders are asked to come to enter of ring when they have not performed the last command correctly. The last rider on rail remaining wins.
Riders carry a glass of soda pop on their horse. As the competition moves on, you walk, trot, and even canter. When the time is up, the riders with the most soda in their cups win. winners usually win a six pack of soda as a prize.

Wash Day Races:
Run or ride to the other end of the arena where a clothes line is set up with over lots of different sized shirts/pants. Rider puts on a set of a shirt or pants, blouse or skirt and races back. So funny to watch in real life. Most shows get the clothes from goodwill for free.

RULE 28: HUNTER UNDER SADDLE ARENA

(a) Hunters under saddle should be suitable to purpose. Hunters should move with long, low strides reaching forward with ease and smoothness, be able to lengthen stride and cover ground with relaxed, free-flowing movement, while exhibiting correct gaits that are of the proper cadence. The quality of the movement and the consistency of the gaits is a major consideration. Horses should be obedient, have a bright expression with alert ears, and should respond willingly to the rider with light leg and hand contact. Horses should be responsive and smooth in transition. When asked to extend the trot or hand gallop, they should move out with the same flowing motion. The poll should be level with, or slightly above, the withers to allow proper impulsion behind. The head position should be slightly in front of, or on, the vertical.

(b) This class will be judged on performance, condition and conformation. Maximum credit shall be given to the flowing, balanced, willing horse.

(c) Horses to be:
(1)shown under saddle, not to jump.
(2)shown at a walk, trot and canter both ways of the ring. Horses should back easily and stand quietly.
(3)reversed to the inside away from the rail.
(d)Horses may be asked to change to canter from the flatfooted walk or trot, at the judges discretion.
(e)Faults to be scored according to severity:
  (1)Quick, short or vertical strides
  (2)Being on the wrong lead
  (3)Breaking gait
  (4)Excessive speed at any gait
  (5)Excessive slowness in any gait, loss of forward momentum
  (6)Failure to take the appropriate gait when called for
  (7)Head carried too high
  (8)Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers)
  (9)Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
  (10)Excessive nosing out
  (11)Failure to maintain light contact with horse’s mouth
  (12)Stumbling
  (13)If a horse appears sullen, dull, lethargic, emaciated, drawn or overly tired
  (14)Consistently showing too far off the rail

(f) Faults which will be cause for disqualification, except in novice amateur or novice youth, which shall be faults scored according to severity:
  (1)Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers)
  (2)Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical

(g)At the option of the judge, all or just the top 12 horses may be required to hand gallop, one or both ways of the ring. Never more than 12 horses to hand gallop at one time. At the hand gallop, the judge may ask the group to halt and stand quietly on a free rein (loosened rein).

RULE 29: HUNTER UNDER SADDLE NATURAL – NO RAIL Hunter Under Saddle Natural - No Rail is a class that was written for hobbyists and does not exist in the real world. It is for hobbyists that do not own arena fencing but still want to enter a English Hunter Under Saddle entry. There are no arena fences and most of all No Trail Obstacles in the class. There is no cross entering of Hunter Under Saddle Natural - No Rail Fence and English Trail Natural w/ Obstacle using the same photo. Just envision a Hunter Under Saddle class but without the arena wall and you have the requirements to enter the class.

a) Attire
Tack may be somewhat more relaxed as well.

b) Review
RULE 28 for premium requirements as to tack, saddle, any rider, etc they apply to this class with the exception of fence rail.

RULE 30: HUNT SEAT EQUITATION

A doll rider is required for this class. The class is judged 80% on the rider and 20% on the horse. Hunt Seat Equitation is an evaluation based on the ability of a rider to perform various maneuvers in harmony with his/her horse. The horse is judged on it's ability to be a pleasure style mount. The poll should be level with, or slightly above the withers, to allow proper impulsion behind. The head should not be carried behind the vertical, giving the appearance of intimidation, or be excessively nosed out, giving a resistant appearance. Horses are asked to walk, trot, canter and sometimes hand gallop both directions of the arena, to stand in a line-up, rein-back and for a possible pattern consisting of other movements at the direction of the judge. Entries should work with a smooth regular gait, a natural willing and responsive headset; not necessarily fully flexed at the poll depending upon breed, conformation and style. They should show a forward - going way of impulsion and conformation consistence with a smooth and sustainable ride such a s a well-sloped shoulder, good pasterns, and a supple back with well-developed hind quarters. The demeanor of the horse (model) should be of happy and obedient participation in the class.

A) Patterns:
A photo submission may be of a pattern in additional to rail work. When a pattern is used it is under the following guidelines:
1) All patterns must include a trot and canter. Horses’ gaits are to be ridden with the same cadence and speed as you would find in the rail phase.

B) Class Procedure:
Entries may depict worked individually from the gate or they may all enter at once, but a working order must be drawn regardless. The entire class, or only the finalists, must work at all three gaits at least one direction of the arena. Rail work can be used to break ties and possibly adjust placings. Individual works may be compromised of any of the following:
Group #1: Walk, Sitting Trot, Extended Trot, Posting Trot, Canter, Circles, Figure 8, Halt, Back, Sidepass, Address Reins, Demonstrate Change of Diagonal.
Group #2: Serpentine (Trot or Canter), Turn on Haunches or Forehand, Leg-Yield, Flying or Simple Change of Lead.
Group #3: Canter and Hand Gallop in a straight or curved line, Counter-Canter Figure 8, Drop or Pick-up Irons without stopping. A turn on the forehand to the right is accomplished by moving haunches to the left. A forehand turn to the left is accomplished by moving haunches to the right. If riders are asked to drop their irons, they can leave them down or cross them over the withers. When performing a leg-yield, the horse should move forward and lateral in a diagonal direction with the horse’s body straight with a slight flexion of the head in the opposite direction of lateral movement. When a horse yields to the right the head is slightly (just to see the eye of the horse) to the left. A horse yielding to the left the head is slightly flexed to the right.

C) Basic Position:
(1) Hands should be over and in front of horse’s withers, knuckles thirty degrees inside the vertical, hands slightly apart and making a straight line from horse’s mouth to rider’s elbow. Method of holding reins is optional, and bight of reins may fall on either side. However, all reins must be picked up at the same time.
(2) The eyes should be up and shoulders back. Toes should be at an angle best suited to rider’s conformation; heels down, calf of leg in contact with horse. Iron should be on the ball of the foot and must not be tied to the girth.
(3) THE WALK: Should be a 4-beat gait with the rider in a vertical position with a following hand.
(4) THE POSTING TROT: Figure 8 at trot, demonstrating change of diagonals. At left diagonal, rider should be sitting the saddle when left front leg is on the ground; at right diagonal rider should be sitting the saddle when right front leg is on the ground; when circling clockwise at a trot, rider should be on left diagonal; when circling counter-clockwise, rider should be on right diagonal. The rider should close his/her hip angle to allow his/her torso to follow the horizontal motion of the horse. The upper body should be inclined about 20 degrees in front of the vertical.
(5) SITTING TROT AND CANTER: At the sitting trot the upper body is only slightly in front of the vertical. At the canter the body should be positioned slightly more in front of the vertical. As the stride is shortened, the body should be in a slightly more erect position.
(6) TWO-POINT POSITION: The pelvis should be forward, but relaxed, lifting the rider’s weight off the horse’s back and transferring the weight through the rider’s legs. In this position the two points of contact between horse and rider are the rider’s legs. Hands should be forward, up the neck, not resting on the neck.
(7) HAND GALLOP: A three-beat, lengthened canter ridden in two-point position. The legs are on the horse’s sides while the seat is held out of the saddle. When at the hand gallop, the rider’s angulation will vary somewhat as the horse’s stride is shortened and lengthened. A good standard at a normal hand gallop should be about 30 degrees in front of the vertical.
(8) Some breeds have a distinct way of going that represent the huntseat standard for their breed. An example is the BHR Hunter, which is moving in a way that typifies the stock-type hunter but is not indictive of the movement of a sport-type huntseat pleasure mount. Huntseat Arabians tend to have slightly more action, although excessive action should be penalized. Entries that make reference to a breed association or particular national standard (AQHA, USFE etc) on the comment line saying that should get extra credit if the model is clearly performing to the standard.

D)Suit to Purpose:
Hunters under saddle should be suitable to purpose. Hunters should move with long, low strides reaching forward with ease and smoothness, be able to lengthen stride and cover ground with relaxed, free-flowing movement, while exhibiting correct gaits that are of the proper cadence. The quality of the movement and the consistency of the gaits is a major consideration. Horses should be obedient, have a bright expression with alert ears, and should respond willingly to the rider with light leg and hand contact. Horses should be responsive and smooth in transition. When asked to extend the trot or hand gallop, they should move out with the same flowing motion. The poll should be level with, or slightly above, the withers to allow proper impulsion behind. The head position should be slightly in front of, or on, the vertical.

E) You Score IMEHA Hunt Seat Equitation on the following basis:
The horse is scored with faults to be scored according to severity:
(1) Quick, short or vertical strides
(2) Being on the wrong lead
(3)Breaking gait
(4) Excessive speed at any gait
(5) Excessive slowness in any gait, loss of forward momentum
(6) Failure to take the appropriate gait when called for
(7) Head carried too high
(8) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers)
(9) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
(10) Excessive nosing out
(11) Failure to maintain light contact with horse’s mouth
(12) Stumbling
(13) If a horse appears sullen, dull, lethargic, emaciated, drawn or overly tired
(14) Consistently showing too far off the rail

F) SCORING:
Faults which shall be scored according to severity:
Horse:
(1) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers consistently)
(2) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical consistently
Rider:
(1) Incorrect hands on rein.
(2) Loose of direct contact on reins.
(3) Incorrect heels of rider
(4) Incorrect balance of seat, shoulders, toes, ankles or poor seat
(5) Balls of feet incorrectly placed in irons
(6) No direct line on side profile of body
(7) Incorrect inclination of body at gait represented
(8) Incorrrect attire
(9) Failure by exhibitor to wear correct number in visible manner
(10) Touching horse
(11) Grabbing any part of the saddle
(12) Cropping or spurring in front of the shoulder
(13) Incorrect diagonal and/or incorrect lead
Disqualifications (should not be placed)include:
(1) Use of prohibited equipment
(2) Knocking over the cone or going off pattern

SUGGESTED SCORING may be on a basis of 0-20 with 1/2 point increments acceptable, an approximate breakdown follows:
20: Excellent equitation including body position and use of aids. Pattern is performed promptly, precisely and smoothly. 18-19: Generally excellent performance with one minor fault in appearance and position of exhibitor or execution of the pattern (performance).
16-17: Generally good pattern execution and equitation with one minor fault in precision or execution of pattern (performance), or appearance and position of exhibitor.
14-15: Average pattern that lacks quickness or precision, or rider has obvious equitation flaws that prevent effective equitation, or commits two or three minor faults in the performance or appearance and position of exhibitor.
12-13: One major fault or several minor faults in the performance and/or appearance and position of exhibitor that precludes effective communication with the horse.
10-11: Two major faults or many minor faults in the performance or appearance and position of exhibitor.
6-9: Several major faults or one severe fault in the performance, or appearance and position of exhibitor. Exhibitor demonstrates a complete lack of riding ability or commits a severe fault in the performance or appearance and position of exhibitor.
1-5: Exhibitor commits one or more severe faults in the performance, or appearance and position of exhibitor, but does complete the class and avoids disqualification.

Hunt Seat Doll Rider:
Rider should have a workmanship appearance, seat and hands, light and supple. Hand should be over and in front of horse’s withers, knuckles 30 degrees inside the vertical, hand slightly apart and making a straight line from the horse’s mouth to rider’s elbow. Method of holding reins is optional. All reins are to be picked up at the same time. Eyes should be up with shoulders back, toes slightly out and ankles flexed in. Heels should be down and calf or leg in contact with horse and slightly behind girth.
The rider should sit in a comfortable, balanced, and relaxed manner while maintaining an erect upper body with eyes up and looking forward.
The rider’s legs should have a slight bend and hang beneath the rider such that when viewed from a profile, a straight line (approximately) can be drawn through the rider’s ear, shoulder, hip and heel.
The irons should be placed under the balls of the feet and not under the toe or against the heel.
Toes should be turned only slightly out with ankles flexed in toward the horse.
The lower leg should be held such that light contact would be maintained with the horse.
Arms and hands should be held in a comfortable, relaxed manner with upper arms held in a straight line with the body. The elbow is bent such that the lower arm and hands are in a straight line to the bit.
Hands should be slightly over and in front of the withers with knuckles 30 degrees inside the vertical.

Position in Motion;
At the walk and slow trot, body should be vertical with slight motion in the saddle.
At a posting trot, the body should be inclined forward with slight elevation in the saddle.
At the canter, the body should be halfway between the posting trot and the walk.
At the gallop, and while jumping, the body should be at a similar inclination as when at a posting trot.

Hunt Seat Equitation Pattern #1


1. Walk from cone 1 to cone 2.

2. Trot on left diagonal to cone 3.

3. Canter small circle on right lead.

4. Trot on right diagonal to cone 4.

5. Stop and back one horse length at cone 4.



Hunt Seat Equitation Pattern #2




1. Walk from cone 1 midway to cone 2.

2. Trot a figure 8 starting to the left.

3. At cone 2 canter in left lead.

4. Midway to cone 3 do simple lead change.

5. Stop and back one horse length at cone 3.



Hunt Seat Equitation Pattern #3




1. Walk to cone 1.

2. Sitting trot from cone 1 to cone 2.

3. At cone 2, do circle to the right at posting trot on left

diagonal.

4. At cone 2, stop and back one horse length.

5. Canter on left lead to cone 3.

6. Stop.

7. 270 degree turn on forehand to the right.

8. Canter on right lead to cone 4.

9. Stop.



RULE 31: HUNTSEAT BAREBACK PLEASURE

No doll rider is allowed in this class. Horses are judged on their abilities to be a pleasure style mount. Horses are asked to walk, trot, canter and sometimes hand gallop both directions of the arena, to stand in a line-up, rein-back. There are no additional patterns required for this class. Entries should work with a smooth regular gait, a natural willing and responsive headset; not necessarily fully flexed at the poll depending upon breed, conformation and style. They should show a forward - going way of impulsion and conformation consistence with a smooth and sustainable ride such a s a well-sloped shoulder, good pasterns, and a supple back with well-developed hind quarters. The demeanor of the horse (model) should be of happy and obedient participation in the class.

(a) Hunters under saddle should be suitable to purpose. Hunters should move with long, low strides reaching forward with ease and smoothness, be able to lengthen stride and cover ground with relaxed, free-flowing movement, while exhibiting correct gaits that are of the proper cadence. The quality of the movement and the consistency of the gaits is a major consideration. Horses should be obedient, have a bright expression with alert ears, and should respond willingly to the rider with light leg and hand contact. Horses should be responsive and smooth in transition. When asked to extend the trot or hand gallop, they should move out with the same flowing motion. The poll should be level with, or slightly above, the withers to allow proper impulsion behind. The head position should be slightly in front of, or on, the vertical.
(b) This class will be judged on performance, condition and conformation. Maximum credit shall be given to the flowing, balanced, willing horse.
(c) Horses to be:
Shown at a walk, trot and canter both ways of the ring. Horses should back easily and stand quietly.
Reversed to the inside away from the rail.
(d) Horses may be asked to change to canter from the flatfooted walk or trot, at the judges discretion.

You Score Hunter Under Saddle Gaits on the following basis:
Faults to be scored according to severity:
(1) Quick, short or vertical strides
(2) Being on the wrong lead
(3) Breaking gait
(4) Excessive speed at any gait
(5) Excessive slowness in any gait, loss of forward momentum
(6) Failure to take the appropriate gait when called for
(7) Head carried too high
(8) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers)
(9) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
(10) Excessive nosing out
(11) Failure to maintain light contact with horse’s mouth
(12) Stumbling
(13) If a horse appears sullen, dull, lethargic, emaciated, drawn or overly tired
14) Consistently showing too far off the rail

Faults:
(1) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers consistently)
(2) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical consistently

RULE 32: HUNT SEAT EQUITATION

A doll rider is required for this class. The class is judged 80% on the rider and 20% on the horse. Hunt Seat Bareback Equitation is an evaluation based on the ability of a rider to perform various maneuvers in harmony with his/her horse. The horse is judged on it's ability to be a pleasure style mount. The poll should be level with, or slightly above the withers, to allow proper impulsion behind. The head should not be carried behind the vertical, giving the appearance of intimidation, or be excessively nosed out, giving a resistant appearance.

Horses are asked to walk, trot, canter and sometimes hand gallop both directions of the arena, to stand in a line-up, rein-back. There is no additional pattern work for this class. Entries should work with a smooth regular gait, a natural willing and responsive headset; not necessarily fully flexed at the poll depending upon breed, conformation and style. They should show a forward - going way of impulsion and conformation consistence with a smooth and sustainable ride such as a well-sloped shoulder, good pasterns, and a supple back with well-developed hind quarters. The demeanor of the horse (model) should be of happy and obedient participation in the class.

Some breeds have a distinct way of going that represent the huntseat standard for their breed. An example is the BHR Hunter, which is moving in a way that typifies the stock-type hunter but is not indictive of the movement of a sport-type huntseat pleasure mount. Huntseat Arabians tend to have slightly more action, although excessive action should be penalized. Entries that make reference to a breed association or particular national standard (AQHA, USFE etc) on the comment line saying that should get extra credit if the model is clearly performing to the standard.

a)Hunters under saddle should be suitable to purpose. Hunters should move with long, low strides reaching forward with ease and smoothness, be able to lengthen stride and cover ground with relaxed, free-flowing movement, while exhibiting correct gaits that are of the proper cadence. The quality of the movement and the consistency of the gaits is a major consideration. Horses should be obedient, have a bright expression with alert ears, and should respond willingly to the rider with light leg and hand contact. Horses should be responsive and smooth in transition. When asked to extend the trot or hand gallop, they should move out with the same flowing motion. The poll should be level with, or slightly above, the withers to allow proper impulsion behind. The head position should be slightly in front of, or on, the vertical.

(b) This class will be judged on performance, condition and conformation. Maximum credit shall be given to the flowing, balanced, willing horse.

(c) Horses to be:
Shown at a walk, trot and canter both ways of the ring. Horses should back easily and stand quietly.
Reversed to the inside away from the rail.
Horses may be asked to change to canter from the flatfooted walk or trot, at the judges discretion.

You Score Hunt Seat Bareback Equitation Gaits on the following basis:
Faults to be scored according to severity:
(1) Quick, short or vertical strides
(2) Being on the wrong lead
(3) Breaking gait
(4) Excessive speed at any gait
(5) Excessive slowness in any gait, loss of forward momentum
(6) Failure to take the appropriate gait when called for
(7) Head carried too high
(8) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers)
(9) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
(10) Excessive nosing out
(11) Failure to maintain light contact with horse’s mouth
(12) Stumbling
(13) If a horse appears sullen, dull, lethargic, emaciated, drawn or overly tired
(14) Consistently showing too far off the rail
Faults which will be cause for disqualification, except in novice amateur or novice youth, which shall be faults scored according to severity:
(1) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers consistently)
(2) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical consistently
Doll Rider:
Rider should have a workmanship appearance, seat and hands, light and supple. Hand should be over and in front of horse’s withers, knuckles 30 degrees inside the vertical, hand slightly apart and making a straight line from the horse’s mouth to rider’s elbow. Method of holding reins is optional. All reins are to be picked up at the same time. Eyes should be up with shoulders back, toes slightly out and ankles flexed in. Heels should be down and calf or leg in contact with horse.
The rider should sit in a comfortable, balanced, and relaxed manner while maintaining an erect upper body with eyes up and looking forward.
The rider’s legs should have a slight bend and hang beneath the rider such that when viewed from a profile, a straight line (approximately) can be drawn through the rider’s ear, shoulder, hip and heel.
The lower leg should be held such that light contact would be maintained with the horse.
Arms and hands should be held in a comfortable, relaxed manner with upper arms held in a straight line with the body. The elbow is bent such that the lower arm and hands are in a straight line to the bit.
Hands should be slightly over and in front of the withers with knuckles 30 degrees inside the vertical.
Position in Motion;
At the walk and slow trot, body should be vertical with slight motion on horse's back.
At a posting trot, the body should be inclined forward with slight elevation from horse's back.
At the canter, the body should be halfway between the posting trot and the walk.
At the gallop, and while jumping, the body should be at a similar inclination as when at a posting trot.

RULE 33: ENGLISH HUNT SEAT EQUITATION YOUTH EVENTS

These classes are seen in the doll rider shows and are judged on manners and performance of the horse and the rider's ability to handle the horse. For the Leadline class an adult doll handler on the ground is required. Person leading horse is to be dressed in accordance with the exhibitor. Leadline and Walk Trot Equitation Classes are judged 80% on the rider and 20% on the horse. A doll rider is required for this class. All rules are the same as other Hunt Seat Equitation Classes. Hunt Seat Bareback Equitation is an evaluation based on the ability of a rider to perform various maneuvers in harmony with his/her horse. The horse is judged on it's ability to be a pleasure style mount. The poll should be level with, or slightly above the withers, to allow proper impulsion behind. The head should not be carried behind the vertical, giving the appearance of intimidation, or be excessively nosed out, giving a resistant appearance.

Leadline - 6 and Under
Requires a rider and a handler. Halter is placed under the bridle and handler leads the rider around only for safety. Rider should be able to steer, walk and back their horse.

Walk Trot - 10 and Under
Requires a child rider that looks to be 10 or under. Rider must be able to steer, back, walk and trot their horse both ways of an arena.

RULE 34: HUNT SEAT TRAIL ARENA

A horse should demostrate a willing walk and calmly work over and through all obstacle, showing agility, in control of the rider and on the bit, balance, and ready responsiveness. Horses that shy, pace, above the bridle or otherwise demostrating excitement or lack of control are not suitable for arena trail. A trail horse should, however, not be a dead head but should show interest in the obstacles. A trail obtacle represents a test and the horse is judged on how well it is meeting that test. The obstacle may test clamness, agility or control. All obstacles test willingness and obedience. Credit will be given to horses negotiating the obstacles with style and some degree of speed, providing correctness is not sacrificed. Horses should receive credit for showing attentiveness to the obstacles and the capability of picking their own way through the course when obstacles warrant it, and willingly responding to the rider’s cues on more difficult obstacles. Gaits are halt, walk, trot, canter and back.

You Score English Trail Arena on the following basis:
Obstacles:
Many associations severly limit the obstacles allowed; especially AQHA, ApHA and APHC. However these restricted obstacles are allowed in USAE so unless the entry specifically states the horse is being shown in the restricted breed association approved show then a lentient standard should take precedence. Unless the obstacle is balantly unsafe. USAE rules state unsafe obstacles are the following: fire extingushers, perforated plywood in water boxes, exotic wild animals (lions, tigers and bears staked out) or unsafe elements such as hay bales (height too high and horse can stab and foot down into the bale and be unable to pull its foot free.) Not that these items should be banned, but not recommended. A setup with these items should not be eliminated but may be penalized at the judge's discretion.

Recommended obstacles are as follows:
Approved Obstacles are: Gate:
Opening, passing through and closing gate. (Losing control of gate is to be penalized.) Use a gate which will not endanger horse or rider. If the gate has a metal, plastic or wooden support bar under the opening, riders must work the gate moving forward through it. No support under the bridge and horse and rider may back through the gate.
Ground Poles:
Ride over at least four logs or poles. These can be in a straight line, curved, zigzag or raised. The space between the logs is to be measured and the path the horse is to take should be the measuring point. All elevated elements must be placed in a cup, notched block, or otherwise secured so they cannot roll. The height should be measured from the ground to the top of the element. Care should be given to keep in mind the scale for the spacing of real walkovers, trotovers, and lopeovers which are:
(A) The spacing for walkovers shall be 20” to 24” (40 cm to 60 cm) and may be elevated to 12” (30 cm). Elevated walkovers should be set at least 22” (55 cm) apart.
(B) The spacing for trotovers shall be 3’ to 3’6” (90 cm-105 cm) and may be elevated to 8” (20 cm).
(C) The spacing for lopeovers shall be 6’ to 7’ (1.8 to 2.1 meters) or increments thereof, and may be elevated to 8” (20 cm).
Back Thru:
Backing obstacle. Backing obstacles to be spaced a minimum of 28” (70 cm). If elevated, 30” (75 cm) spacing is required. Entrants cannot be asked to back over a stationary object such as a wooden pole or metal bar.
(A) Back through and around at least three markers.
(B) Back through L, V, U, straight or similar-shaped course. May be elevated no more than 24” (60 cm).
Artificial Water Hazard:
Artifical Water Hazard of tarp as long as no metal or slick bottom-boxes are used.
Serpentine obstacles
Serpentine obstacles at walk or jog. Spacing to be minimum of 6’ ( 1.8 meters) for jog.
Carry objects:
Carry objects from one part of arena to another. Only objects which reasonably might be carried on a trail ride may be used.
Wooden Bridge:
Ride over wooden bridge. Suggested minimum width shall be 36” (90 cm) wide and at least six feet long. No railing may be used. Bridge should be sturdy, safe and negotiated at a walk only.
Sticker:
Sticker may be put on and removed.
Mail box:
Remove and replace materials from mailbox.
Side Pass:
Side pass. Side pass may be elevated to 12” (30 cm) maximum) as long as the ends are placed in a safe roll out or jump style knock down cup.
Square:
An obstacle consisting of four logs or rails, each 5’ to 7’ (1.5 to 2.1 meters) long, laid in a square. Each contestant will enter the square by riding over log or rail as designated. When all four feet are inside the square, rider should execute a turn, as indicated, and depart.
Combinations:
A combination of two or more of any obstacle listed above is acceptable.

IMEHA, APHC, AQHA & ApHC Prohibits the following Obstacles:
1. Tires
2. Animals
3. Hides
4. PVC Pipe
5. Dismounting
6. Jumps
7. Rocking, moving or railed bridges
8. Water box with floating or moving parts
9. Flames, dry ice, fire extinguishers, etc
10. Logs or poles elevated in a manner that permits such to roll
11. Ground ties
You Score English Trail Gaits on the following basis:
Faults to be scored according to severity:
(1) Quick, short or vertical strides
(2) Being on the wrong lead
(3) Breaking gait
(4) Excessive speed at any gait
(5) Excessive slowness in any gait, loss of forward momentum
(6) Failure to take the appropriate gait when called for
(7) Head carried too high
(8) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers)
(9) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
(10) Excessive nosing out
(11) Failure to maintain light contact with horse’s mouth
(12) Stumbling
(13) If a horse appears sullen, dull, lethargic, emaciated, drawn or overly tired
(14) Consistently showing too far off the rail
Faults which will be cause for disqualification, except in novice amateur or novice youth, which shall be faults scored according to severity:
(1) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers consistently)
(2) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical consistently
At the option of the judge, all or just the top 12 horses may be required to hand gallop, one or both ways of the ring. Never more than 12 horses to hand gallop at one time. At the hand gallop, the judge may ask the group to halt and stand quietly on a free rein (loosened rein).

RULE 35: ENGLISH TRAIL NATURAL – NO RAIL FENCE

This class is seen only in the model horse hobby. It is written for those people who wish to compete in trail class but do not have arena wall props. Some rulings, attire and equipment may be relaxed slightly. Natural trail classes are judged under the same rules and with the same requirements as Arena Trail but are held outside of the arena using natural obstacles such as creeks, ponds, uphill and downhills slopes, ditches fallen trees, bushes, pasture gates, etc. The natural trail class should be judged on realism, imagination, and the horse's apparent ability to provide a safe and pleasurable ride. Any English style tack and any attire permitted. Unsafe equipment may be penalized at the judge's decision. Any misbehavior should be penalized, including but not limited to shying, bucking, rearing, fighting the bridle, being above the bit, jumping or leaping away of the obstacle.

No cross entering using the same photo for both English Natural Trail and English Pleasure Natural.

Natural Trail requires an obstacle and Natural Pleasure should have no obstacle in the photo. A horse should demonstrate a willing walk and calmly work over and through all obstacle, showing agility, in control of the rider and on the bit, balance, and ready responsiveness. Horses that shy, pace, above the bridle or otherwise demonstrating excitement or lack of control are not suitable for trail natural. A trail horse should, however, not be a dead head but should show interest in the obstacles. A trail obstacle represents a test and the horse is judged on how well it is meeting that test. The obstacle may test calmness, agility or control. All obstacles test willingness and obedience. Credit will be given to horses negotiating the obstacles with style and some degree of speed, providing correctness is not sacrificed. Horses should receive credit for showing attentiveness to the obstacles and the capability of picking their own way through the course when obstacles warrant it, and willingly responding to the rider’s cues on more difficult obstacles. Gaits are halt, walk, trot, canter and back.

You Score English Trail Natural on the following basis:
Obstacles:
Creeks
Ponds
Uphill and downhills slopes
Ditches
Fallen Trees
Bushes
Pasture Gates
Tires
Animal Contact
Dismounting
Jumps
Rocking, moving or railed bridges
Water box with floating or moving parts
Ground ties
Any other type natural obstacle or experience outside of an arena

You Score English Trail Gaits on the following basis:
Faults to be scored according to severity:
(1) Quick, short or vertical strides
(2) Being on the wrong lead
(3) Breaking gait
(4) Excessive speed at any gait
(5) Excessive slowness in any gait, loss of forward momentum
(6) Failure to take the appropriate gait when called for
(7) Head carried too high
(8) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers)
(9) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
(10) Excessive nosing out
(11) Failure to maintain light contact with horse’s mouth
(12) Stumbling
(13) If a horse appears sullen, dull, lethargic, emaciated, drawn or overly tired
(14) Consistently showing too far off the rail
Faults which will be cause for disqualification, except in novice amateur or novice youth, which shall be faults scored according to severity:
(1) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers consistently)
(2) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical consistently
At the option of the judge, all or just the top 12 horses may be required to hand gallop, one or both ways of the ring. Never more than 12 horses to hand gallop at one time. At the hand gallop, the judge may ask the group to halt and stand quietly on a free rein (loosened rein).

If You Use A Doll Rider:
1.) Rider should have a workmanship appearance, seat and hands, light and supple. Hand should be over and in front of horse’s withers, knuckles 30 degrees inside the vertical, hand slightly apart and making a straight line from the horse’s mouth to rider’s elbow. Method of holding reins is optional. All reins are to be picked up at the same time. Eyes should be up with shoulders back, toes slightly out and ankles flexed in. Heels should be down and calf or leg in contact with horse and slightly behind girth.
2.) The rider should sit in a comfortable, balanced, and relaxed manner while maintaining an erect upper body with eyes up and looking forward.
3.) The rider’s legs should have a slight bend and hang beneath the rider such that when viewed from a profile, a straight line (approximately) can be drawn through the rider’s ear, shoulder, hip and heel.
4.) The irons should be placed under the balls of the feet and not under the toe or against the heel.
5.) Toes should be turned only slightly out with ankles flexed in toward the horse.
6.) The lower leg should be held such that light contact would be maintained with the horse.
7.) Arms and hands should be held in a comfortable, relaxed manner with upper arms held in a straight line with the body. The elbow is bent such that the lower arm and hands are in a straight line to the bit.
8.) Hands should be slightly over and in front of the withers with knuckles 30 degrees inside the vertical.
9.) Position in Motion;
    a) At the walk and slow trot, body should be vertical with slight motion in the saddle.
    b) At a posting trot, the body should be inclined forward with slight elevation in the saddle.
    c) At the canter, the body should be halfway between the posting trot and the walk.
    d) At the gallop, and while jumping, the body should be at a similar inclination as when at a posting trot.

RULE 36: CROSS COUNTRY

Cross Country is an endurance test, and is one of the three phases of the sport of 3 Day Eventing
    WIKIPEDIA CROSS COUNTRY REFERENCE LINK

It may also be a competition in its own right, known as hunter trials or simply "cross-country" - these tend to be lower level, local competitions. The object of the endurance test is to prove the speed, endurance and jumping ability of the true cross-country horse when he is well trained and brought to the peak of condition. At the same time, it demonstrates the rider's knowledge of pace and the use of this horse across country.

Course Design:
The cross-country course is approximately two and three quarter to four miles (6 km) long, comprising some twenty-four to thirty-six fixed and solid obstacles. Obstacles usually are built to look "natural" (out of logs, for instance), however odd materials and decorations may be added to test the horse's bravery. Obstacles can include all those that might be found if riding across the countryside.

Obstacles:
Water
Trees
Logs
Ditches
Banks
Single Jumps
Vertical Jumps
Multiple elements in a single jump
Triple bars
Oxers or Spreads
Water Obstacles
Log Jumps
Combinations of several elements including logs, banks, water, and ditches.
Some obstacles are flagged for mutli-levels. Use of Flags
All obstacles or compulsory passage ways are flagged, with a red flag on the right and a white flag on the left. A black stripe on the red flag indicates that it is an option for the obstacle, and another route may be taken if the rider so chooses, without penalty. All obstacles are numbered, and the color of the numbering can indicate which level the fence is for if multiple levels are competing at the event (for example, white numbers on a green background indicate that the fence is on the Preliminary level course, however in British eventing this colour combination would indicate the intermediate track, so riders should always check the course map for course markers).
Using Correct Colors for Levels
Use of accurate colors for various levels of competition such as:
Advanced: white on blue background
Intermediate: white on red background
Preliminary: white on green background
Training: white on black background
Novice: black on white background.

Scoring:

Because the lowest score wins, each combination of horse and rider seeks to complete the cross-country with as few penalties as possible. If larger faults occur, such as multiple refusals, the horse will be eliminated (E) from competition and will not be allowed to finish the course. Elimination has also been subdivided in the United States to include Technical Elimination (TE), if a mistake is made that is unrelated to the horse (for example, jumping two fences in the wrong order). Riders may also choose to retire (R) on course if their horse is having a poor run. This prevents the rider from continuing the competition, but is often a good choice if the horse is physically or mentally overfaced by the challenges. Mandatory Retirement (MR) occurs if the horse falls, even if he is not noticeably injured, to help protect the horse's welfare. Withdrawing (W) only occurs if the horse is taken out of competition when he is not on course. Rider may be disqualified (DQ) if they endanger their mount or other people on course. The United States added Dangerous Riding penalties in 2007, to be added at the discretion of the ground jury if a rider is going around the course in an unsafe manner (for example, at an extreme speed).

A refusal results in 20 penalties

Disobediences from the horse

  • First refusal or crossing tracks (circling) in front of an obstacle: 20 penalties per obstacle

  • 2nd refusal or crossed tracks at the same obstacle: 40 additional penalties

  • 3rd refusal or crossed tracks at the same obstacle (an "obstacle" includes all its elements): elimination

  • 4th cumulative refusal or crossed tracks on the entire course: elimination

Errors on course

  • Jumping obstacles in the wrong order (#5 before #4, or element B before A): elimination

  • Jumping a fence in a direction which is not flagged: elimination

  • Omission of a jump or compulsory passage: elimination

  • Note: the only time a competitor may jump an obstacle twice in a row is if a refusal occurs at a second element (B) and the rider can not approach "B" without re-jumping "A" (a bounce , for example)

  • Note: the horse is only allowed to jump from a standstill if the obstacle's height is no higher than 30 cm (for example, banks and ditches). Jumping any other obstacles from a standstill (a "prolonged halt") counts as a refusal.

  • Note: horses are allowed to step sideways, but any step back is considered a refusal.

Falls

  • Fall of Rider: Elimination

  • Fall of horse (quarters and shoulder touches ground): Mandatory retirement

  • Note: riders may dismount at anytime on course without penalty, but the dismount must not be related to an obstacle

Time faults

  • Every second commenced above the optimum time, rounded up to the nearest second: 0.4 penalties/sec

  • Exceeding the allowed time (2× the optimum time): elimination

  • In the United States, going too fast for the level will result in "Speed Faults": 0.4 penalties/sec for every second under the Speed fault time

  • Trying to increase one's time, or "willfull delay," to avoid speed faults (circling, serpentining, walking, or halting between the final fence and the finish): 20 penalties

Other reasons for elimination

  • Rider without headgear or a fastened harness strap

  • Improper saddlery (for example, riding with a running martingale and no rein stops)

  • Overtaking another rider on course in a dangerous manner (for example, jumping a fence at the same time as the other rider)

  • Willful obstruction of an overtaking competitor

  • Failure to stop on course when signalled

  • Horses head and front shoulder outside of the flags

  • In lower level cross country competitions, failure to wear medical armband (at discretion of Ground Jury)
RULE 37: ENGLISH RIDING

English Riding is a class that was written for hobbyists and does not exist in the real world. It is run under the same premise as Western Riding but using English style tack. It is open to both hunt seat and saddleseat. The horse is judged on quality of gaits, lead changes at the canter, response to the rider, manners and disposition. The horse should perform with reasonable speed, and be sensible, well-mannered, free and easy moving. Credit shall be given for and emphasis placed on smoothness, even cadence of gaits, and the horse’s ability to change leads precisely and easily rear and front at the center point between markers. Some breeds have a distinct way of going that represent the huntseat standard for their breed. An example is the BHR Hunter, which is moving in a way that typifies the stock-type hunter but is not indictive of the movement of a sport-type huntseat pleasure mount. Huntseat Arabians tend to have slightly more action, although excessive action should be penalized. Entries that make reference to a breed association or particular national standard (AQHA, USFE etc) on the comment line saying that should get extra credit if the model is clearly performing to the standard.

(a) Hunt Seat horses should be suitable to purpose. Hunt Seat horses should move with long, low strides reaching forward with ease and smoothness, be able to lengthen stride and cover ground with relaxed, free-flowing movement, while exhibiting correct gaits that are of the proper cadence. The quality of the movement and the consistency of the gaits is a major consideration. Horses should be obedient, have a bright expression with alert ears, and should respond willingly to the rider with light leg and hand contact. Horses should be responsive and smooth in transition. When asked to extend the trot or hand gallop, they should move out with the same flowing motion. The poll should be level with, or slightly above, the withers to allow proper impulsion behind. The head position should be slightly in front of, or on, the vertical.

(b) Saddleseat horses should move with more animation but still be suitable to purpose.

You Score English Riding Gaits on the following basis:
Faults to be scored according to severity:
(1) Quick, short or vertical strides
(2) Being on the wrong lead
(3) Breaking gait
(4) Excessive speed at any gait
(5) Excessive slowness in any gait, loss of forward momentum
(6) Failure to take the appropriate gait when called for
(7) Head carried too high
(8) Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers)
(9) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
(10) Excessive nosing out
(11) Failure to maintain light contact with horse’s mouth
(12) Stumbling
(13) If a horse appears sullen, dull, lethargic, emaciated, drawn or overly tired
(14) Consistently showing too far off the rail

Faults which will be cause for disqualification, except in novice amateur or novice youth, which shall be faults scored according to severity:
   (1)Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers consistently)
   (2) Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical consistently

At the option of the judge, all or just the top 12 horses may be required to hand gallop, one or both ways of the ring. Never more than 12 horses to hand gallop at one time. At the hand gallop, the judge may ask the group to halt and stand quietly on a free rein (loosened rein).

If You Use A Doll Rider:
Rider should have a workmanship appearance, seat and hands, light and supple. Hand should be over and in front of horse’s withers, knuckles 30 degrees inside the vertical, hand slightly apart and making a straight line from the horse’s mouth to rider’s elbow. Method of holding reins is optional. All reins are to be picked up at the same time. Eyes should be up with shoulders back, toes slightly out and ankles flexed in. Heels should be down and calf or leg in contact with horse and slightly behind girth.
The rider should sit in a comfortable, balanced, and relaxed manner while maintaining an erect upper body with eyes up and looking forward.

Hunt Seat Rider Basic Riding Position:
The hunt seat rider’s legs should have a slight bend and hang beneath the rider such that when viewed from a profile, a straight line (approximately) can be drawn through the rider’s ear, shoulder, hip and heel.
The irons should be placed under the balls of the feet and not under the toe or against the heel.
Toes should be turned only slightly out with ankles flexed in toward the horse.
The lower leg should be held such that light contact would be maintained with the horse.
Arms and hands should be held in a comfortable, relaxed manner with upper arms held in a straight line with the body. The elbow is bent such that the lower arm and hands are in a straight line to the bit.
Hands should be slightly over and in front of the withers with knuckles 30 degrees inside the vertical.

Hunt Seat Position in Motion:
At the walk and slow trot, body should be vertical with slight motion in the saddle.
At a posting trot, the body should be inclined forward with slight elevation in the saddle.
At the canter, the body should be halfway between the posting trot and the walk.
At the gallop, and while jumping, the body should be at a similar inclination as when at a posting trot.

Saddleseat Rider
Riders should convey the impression of effective and easy control. To show a horse well, the rider should show him/herself well. Ring generalship shall be taken into consideration by the judges. A complete picture of the whole is of major importance. Hands should be held in an easy position, neither perpendicular nor horizontal to the saddle, and should show sympathy, adaptability, and control. The height the hands are held above the horse’s withers is a matter of how and where the horse carries its head. The method of holding the reins is optional, except that both hands shall be used and all reins must be held up at one time. Bight of the rein should be on the off side. To obtain proper position, rider should place him/herself comfortably in the saddle and find his/her center of gravity by sitting with a slight bend at the knees but without use of irons. While in this position, adjust leathers to fit. Irons should be placed under the ball of the foot (not under the toe or ‘home’), with even pressure on the entire width of the sole and center of the iron. Foot position should be natural (neither extremely in nor out).

Saddleseat Basic Riding Position:
The rider should sit in a comfortable, balanced, and relaxed manner while maintaining an erect upper body with eyes up and looking forward.
The saddleseat rider’s legs should have a slight bend and hang beneath the rider such that when viewed from a profile, a straight line (approximately) can be drawn through the rider’s ear, shoulder, hip and heel.
The irons should be placed under the ball of the foot and not under the toe or against the heel.
Foot should be held in a natural position, neither too far out nor in.
Arms and hands should be held in a comfortable, relaxed manner with upper arms in a straight line with body. The elbow is bent such that the lower arm and hands are in a straight line to the bit. The height the hands are held above the withers is determined by how and where the horse carries its head.
The method of holding reins is optional; however, both hands must be used, and all reins must be picked up at one time. Bight of rein must be on the off side.

Saddleseay Position in Motion:
At the walk, there is slight motion in the saddle with body remaining vertical.
At the trot, there is slight elevation in the saddle. When posting, hips remain under body, not moved in a mechanical up and down or swinging forward backward motion.
At the canter, rider should have a close seat, moving with the horse.
The common mistake among model horse hobbyists is that English Riding is a class for equitation or for enjoyable trail rides. English Riding is an event where the horse is judged on quality of gaits, lead changes at the canter, response to the rider, manners and disposition. The horse should perform with reasonable speed, and be sensible, well-mannered, free and easy moving.

English Riding Class

  1. The horses will be judged on riding quality of gaits (walk, trot, and canter), change of leads, response to rider, manners, disposition, and intelligence.


  2. The English Riding class is a competition on the performance of a sensible, well and mannered, and easy moving ranch horse that has the athletic ability and handiness to do a variety of ranch jobs as well as give its rider a pleasant ride over trails or in open country. This competition is not a race or a stunt and should not be confused with equitation classes in which the rider is judged.


  3. Each horse and rider will perform the English Class riding patterns and routines individually. Check Western Riding for more information and for patterns.



RULE 38 FOX HUNTING OR CUBBING

Fox hunting is an activity involving the tracking, chase, and sometimes killing of a fox, traditionally a red fox, by trained foxhounds or other scent hounds, and a group of followers led by a master of foxhounds, who follow the hounds on foot or on horseback. Fox hunting originated in its current form in the United Kingdom in the 16th century, but is practised all over the world, including Australia, Canada, France, Ireland, Italy, Russia, and the United States. In Australia, the term also refers to the hunting of foxes with firearms similar to spotlighting or deer hunting.

Attire for Formal Foxhunting

*Gentlemen With Colors*
Cap:Blue or black hunting cap with ribbons up is accepted. Top hat preferred.
Coat: Scarlet with brass Oak Ridge buttons. Purple collar edged in gold. Two large brass buttons in the back. Two small buttons on each sleeve. Gentlemen may also wear scarlet or black swallowtail. A black swallow tail is rarely seen on gentlemen in the hunt field but is stunningly handsome. A gentleman wears the black hunt button but no colors on the collar. This also applies to a gentleman in a black frock coat. He may wear the hunt buttons in black, no colors on collar.
Vest: (optional) Canary or white with brass buttons.
Breeches: White only.
Boots: Black leather with tan colored tops.
Gloves: White string; tan or yellow leather.
Stock:
White, properly tied with horizontal gold stock pin. May also be navy blue silk with small, white pin dots or sky blue silk.
Spurs: (optional) Blunt.
Whip: Hunting crop with thong and cord snap. Properly carried but never used unless asked.

*Gentlemen Without Colors*
Cap: Blue or black hunting cap. Black bowler. Ribbons up.
Coat: Black or deepest navy.
Collar: Black.
Vest: (optional) Canary or white with brass buttons.
Breeches: Buff or canary.
Boots: Black, no tops.

*Ladies With Colors*
Cap: Blue or black hunting cap with ribbons up. Black bowler with hairnet. Top hat with shadbelly.
Coat: Black with black Oak Ridge buttons with purple collar edged in gold. Two large black buttons on back. Two small buttons on each sleeve.
Vest: (optional) Canary or white with brass buttons.
Breeches: Buff or canary.
Boots: Black leather with black patent tops.
Gloves: White string: tan or yellow leather.
Stock: White, properly tied with horizontal gold stock pin.
Spurs: (optional) Blunt.
Whips: Hunting crop with thong and cord snap. Properly carried but never used unless asked.

*Ladies Without Colors*
Cap: Blue or black hunting caps. Black bowler with hairnet.
Coat: Black or Deepest Navy.
Collar: Black.
Buttons: Black
Vest: (optional) Canary or white with brass buttons.
Breeches: Buff or canary.
Boots: Black, no tops. Also called butcher boots.
Informal Hunting Attire:
Hat Blue, brown or black hunting cap. Black bowler Ladies wear hairnet.
Coat: Green or tweed jacket.
Shirt: Riding shirt with tie. Plain shirt with tie or ascot.
Breeches: Buff or canary.
Boots: Black or brown. No tops.

Junior Riders Attire
Junior riders may wear informal attire and leggings. Tricorn hat acceptable on a junior.

During the Hunt
Courtesy in the Field
Those awarded colors always ride up front, followed by other first flight riders. Grooms ride to the rear. Hilltoppers ride with the Hilltoppers' Master. If a Hilltopper wishes to join the First Flight she or he must ask the Hilltopper Masters' permission.
Juniors may ride wherever their riding ability dictates but they cannot go before a member with colors, unless invited to do so.
No one never passes the Master.
If a gate is closed when you reach it, make certain the last rider through closes it. If a gate is open, leave it open.

Safety
A red ribbon should be placed in the tail of a horse who kicks and a green ribbon in the tail of a green horse.
When a staff member passes by you, especially on narrow lanes, turn your horse's head toward the staff member ... never your horse's tail.
In tight territory jump single file. If an obstacle is long (i.e., a zigzag fence) take your own line so long as you do not pass the Master. You'll have to write on the blackboard 100 times, "I will not pass the Master."
Hounds always have the right of way.

Enabling Good Sport
Do not speak to hounds. Do not speak to one another when close to hounds-you will bring their heads up.
Fox hunting is a most companionable sport. We encourage you to chat, giggle and thoroughly enjoy yourselves when you're not near hounds. This means diehard gossips ride in the rear. Often the Field Master must listen intently for hounds. We can't always stay close to the Huntsman when territory is forbidding. At those times your Field Master will ask for absolute silence. Help the Field Master by listening. If you hear hounds or the horn, indicate by pointing your hand in that direction.

Viewing the Fox
When you view the fox, stop, point your horse's nose in the direction of the fox and take off your cap using it to point in the direction of the fox.
The viewed fox may not be the hunted fox which certainly makes for an interesting hunt.
If the viewed fox is far away, "Holloa" or "Tally Ho" is in order.
If the viewed fox is close, rely on pointing since you do not want to cause hounds to lift their heads.
If the fox is sitting directly behind you, viewing you, LAUGH. There's little else you can do (this has happened to us).

After the Hunt
There is a tradition involving an involuntary dismount. When parting company with the horse and both feet hit the ground (not necessarily first), riders are to bring or send to the next fixture a bottle of spirits (rider's choice). Taped to the bottle is the rider's name, their horse's name, the date of the hunt and the place where they were dumped on two legs. There are been occasions when a person presenting the bottle also sings to the rest of group. It is said when the horses roll their eyes and the hounds whine, you know it's really bad. If the staff (in red coats) goes off the fee is two bottles.

Terrain:
Terrain and obstacles can include all those that might be found if riding across the countryside.
Fox hunting and cubbing are held outdoors through fields and wooded areas.

Obstacles:
Water
Trees
Logs
Ditches
Banks
Water Obstacles
Log Jumps
Combinations of several elements including logs, banks, water, and ditches.

Quarry animals:
The red fox is the main prey of European and American fox hunts.
The coyote is a significant quarry for many Hunts in North America, particularly in the west and southwest, where there are large open spaces.
The gray fox is also hunted in North America. It is an adept climber of trees, making it harder to hunt with hounds. The smell of the grey fox is not as strong as that of the red, therefore more time is needed for the hounds to take the scent. Unlike the red fox which, during the chase, will run far ahead from the pack, the grey fox will speed toward heavy brush, thus making it more difficult to pursue. Also unlike the red fox, which occurs more prominently in the northern United States, the more southern grey fox is rarely hunted on horseback, due to its densely covered habitat preferences. Generally, two hours are required to fully tire out and capture a grey fox with hounds.
Hunts in the southern United States sometimes pursue the bobcat
In countries such as India, and in other areas formerly under British influence, such as Iraq, the golden jackal is often hunted.

Dogs Used
English Foxhound
American Foxhound. Harriers
Beagles
Greyhound
Lurcher
Terriers to flush or kill foxes that are hiding underground, as they are small enough to pursue the fox through narrow earth passages.

Cubbing Anything goes except wearing red which is for staff. In the U.S., some cubs (young fox) are chased and allowed to escape to teach them better skills of evasion so that they may be tracked (preferably without being killed) again another day. Many foxes learn to evade the hounds by running up or down streams, running along the tops of fences, and other tactics to throw the hounds off the scent. Sometimes dogs are taking out to educate them on tracking scent or to just blow off energy from being keep in the kennels. Normally it a the head huntsman or the kennel master who take the dogs out.

Drag, trail and bloodhound hunting Drag hunting, an equestrian sport which involves dragging an object over the ground to lay a scent for the hounds to follow, can also be popular, either instead of, or in addition to, live quarry hunting. Drag hunts are often considered to be faster than standard fox hunts, with followers not having to wait while the hounds pick up a trail, and often covering an area far larger than a traditional hunt, which may even necessitate a change of horses half way through. A non-equestrian variation, hound trailing, is practiced in the Lake District. Bloodhounds are also used to hunt a human runner in the sport of Hunting the Clean Boot.

You Score Fox Hunting and Cubbing on the following basis:
Points off for:
Rider without headgear or a fastened harness strap
Improper saddlery (for example, riding with a running martingale and no rein stops)

RULE 39: FIELD HUNTER TRIALS

Mounts are evaluated on their ability for use in the actual hunting field. Classes are judged over fences and horses should appear to be sound and capable of lasting a day over sometimes heavy terrain. Gaits should be smooth, regular and effortless. Jumping style should be workmanship like and reliable. Key conformation attributes include a sloping shoulder (smooth ride) good bone (broad and solid cannons, measured just below the knee) powerful hindquarters and a willing nature. Judge's pace the entry to implied takeoff just as an arena hunter is.

Major faults seen in this event are boots on the horse, brightly colored tack or striped obstacles. Nosebands other than cavessons, excessive speed by the mount. A standing martingale is allowed in this class and as become a style since around 1980. Running martingales and double bridles are permitted but never seen. Sidesaddle entries are legal and valid. The mane is typically braided using same colors as is the tail. Roached manes are also seen. Historic entries can have a docked tail. Hunting items just as flasks, sandwich cases (clipped to offside of the saddle), hunting crops and a red ribbon in the tail denotes a horse that kicks and all should be given extra credit. Circling once upon entering the course before first jump is permissible. No dogs in this class and no cross entering from Foxhunting or Cubbing, Handy Hunter, Hunter Pace or Hunter Hack Classes.

Obstacles Used for Field Hunters but not limited to:
Are painted in neutral or natural colors and enhanced by plants or flowers.
Brush fences, brown or green pole with matching wing standards
Stone walls
Post and Rail
Brush
Coop
Wall
Natural Obstacles Found in the Field
All should have a ground line on the approach side of the fence (a pole, flower box, or wall that meets the ground).
Field Hunter fences may be flagged for course reference of approach but are not numbered.
Fences should scale to not less than 2'6" and than more than 4'6" and should be sized appropriately for the age and or skill level of the model.

You Score Field Hunter Trials on the following basis:
To be judged on manners, way of going and style of jumping. Horses shall be credited with maintaining an even hunting pace that covers the course with free-flowing strides. Preference will be given to horses with correct jumping style that meet fences squarely, jumping at the center of fence. Judges shall penalize unsafe jumping and bad form over fence, whether touched or untouched, including twisting. Incorrect leads around the ends of the course or cross-cantering shall be penalized, as well as excessive use of crop. In and outs (one or two strides) shall be taken in the correct number of strides or be penalized. Any error which endangers the horse and/or its rider, particularly refusals or knockdowns, shall be heavily penalized.
Scoring shall be on a basis of 0-100, with an approximate breakdown as follows:
(A) 90-100: an excellent performer and good mover that jumps the entire course with cadence, balance and style.
(B) 80-89: a good performer that jumps all fences reasonably well; an excellent performer that commits one or two minor faults.
(C) 70-79: the average, fair mover that makes no serious faults, but lacks the style, cadence and good balance of the scopier horses; the good performer that makes a few minor faults.
(D) 60-69: poor movers that make minor mistakes; fair or average movers that have one or two poor fences but no major faults or disobediences.
(E) 50-59: a horse that commits one major fault, such as a hind knockdown, refusal, trot, cross canter or drops a leg.
(F) 30-49: a horse that commits two or more major faults, including front knockdowns and refusals, or jumps in a manner that otherwise endangers the horse and/or rider.
(G) 10-29: a horse that avoids elimination but jumps in such an unsafe and dangerous manner as to preclude a higher score.
(e) Elimination:
(1) A total of three disobediences that can include any of the following: refusal, stop, run out or extra circle.
(2) Jumping an obstacle before it is reset.
(3) Bolting from the arena.
(4) Off course.
(5) Deliberately addressing an obstacle.
(6) Failure to trot the horse in a small circle on a loose rein for soundness, after jumping the last fence, while still mounted and prior to leaving the arena.

RULE 40: HANDY HUNTER

Handy Hunter is an arena hunter class that combines elements of flat and over-fences classes, often with elements reminiscent of field hunting. Then in addition to jumping a course, the rider may be asked to open and close a gate or to dismount and lead the horse over a small fence. A handy hunter is not only judged on movement, but also on temperament and manners. The handy hunter should always be relaxed and calm, yet attentive to its rider. It should be responsive to invisible signals and look relatively easy to ride.

Handy hunters are well groomed for show, clean with a shiny coat. They carry a bit more weight than an eventing horse or racehorse. The hooves are normally polished before the horse enters the show ring. The horse's head is trimmed, focusing on the whiskers around the muzzle, the hair of the ears, the bridle path, and lower jaw. The legs are also trimmed, removing all fetlock hair and feathering, and trimming the pasterns and coronet. The mane and forelock may be braided, usually using yarn matching the color of the mane. The tail may be braided from the top down to the end of the tail bone, with the rest of the tail left loose.

A good show hunter must possess an excellent jumping form. The forearm should be parallel or higher with the ground, and the knees and lower legs should be even. The horse should not be lazy with its lower legs, but should tuck them under its forearm as it clears the fence, clearly bending its fetlocks and knees. The horse should not throw its body or legs to one side, but should stay perfectly straight over the fence. A good show hunter should show a great bascule, or roundness over a jump. This is often described as the horse taking the shape of a dolphin jumping out of the water, with the horse's back up, and its head reaching forward and down over the fence.

The handy hunter is an efficent mount. The stride is and covers much ground with little effort. It's profile in movement is low and there is little flexion of the horse's joints as it moves. The best hunters moves most from the shoulder and hip. The hunter moves smoothly and freely, pointing its toes as it floats over the ground. It should a kind of floating knee action with long fluid strides. The horse should be forward cadence, so it could jump if needed, but no faster than necessary. The hunter must always be in a balanced frame. The frame of the show hunter differs from that of dressage horses, eventers, and show jumpers, as it travels in a long and low frame, with its head moderately extended. Its frame is more "stretched out" than horses competing in dressage, eventing, or show jumping, but the horse should not be on its forehand. The riders of hunters often ride on a slightly looser rein than seen elsewhere to facilitate this type of movement, and the horse carries its head just in front of the vertical. Even though hunter travels in a long and low frame, it should still be able to collect its stride when necessary yet still maintain tempo and rhythm.

The walk of the show hunter is free and ground-covering; the trot should be balanced and flowing. The canter should be moderately collected. The horse should have a long galloping stride but it should still be balanced and rhythmic.

Circling once upon entering the arena before first jump is permissible. No cross entering from Hunter Under Saddle, Hunter Pace or Hunter Hack Classes.

Obstacles Used for Handy Hunters but not limited to:
Are painted in neutral or natural colors and enhanced by plants or flowers.
Brush fences, brown or green pole with matching wing standards
Stone walls
Post and Rail
Brush
Coop
Wall
All should have a ground line on the approach side of the fence (a pole, flower box, or wall that meets the ground).
Handy Hunter fences may be flagged for course reference of approach but are not numbered.
Fences should scale to not less than 2'6" and than more than 4'3".
Gate to open
Designated Site For Dismount
The course must have at least two changes of direction and at least one combination as well as three of the following: walk over one obstacle, trot over one obstacle, hand gallop a jump, a bending line, a rollback turn, open a gate while mounted, halt and/or back. Judges must place emphasis on promptness and tight turns with precedence being given in that order.

Additional elements may include: putting on a rain coat, picking up an article from a barrel and taking it to someone, jump into an in & out and halt before jumping out, halting on course while another horse canters past you, dismount and lead horse over a small fence and remount.

You Score Handy Hunter Trials on the following basis:
To be judged on manners, way of going and style of jumping. Horses shall be credited with maintaining an even hunting pace that covers the course with free-flowing strides. Preference will be given to horses with correct jumping style that meet fences squarely, jumping at the center of fence. Judges shall penalize unsafe jumping and bad form over fence, whether touched or untouched, including twisting. Incorrect leads around the ends of the course or cross-cantering shall be penalized, as well as excessive use of crop. In and outs (one or two strides) shall be taken in the correct number of strides or be penalized. Any error which endangers the horse and/or its rider, particularly refusals or knockdowns, shall be heavily penalized.
(2) Scoring shall be on a basis of 0-100, with an approximate breakdown as follows:
(A) 90-100: an excellent performer and good mover that jumps the entire course with cadence, balance and style. Performs the required additional handy hunter maneuver or obstacle willingly
(B) 80-89: a good performer that jumps all fences, maneuvers or obstacles reasonably well; an excellent performer that commits one or two minor faults.
(C) 70-79: the average, fair mover that makes no serious faults, but lacks the style, cadence and good balance of the scopier horses; the good performer that makes a few minor faults.
(D) 60-69: poor movers that make minor mistakes; fair or average movers that have one or two poor fences, maneuvers or obstacles but no major faults or disobediences.
(E) 50-59: a horse that commits one major fault, such as a hind knockdown, refusal, trot, cross canter or drops a leg.
(F) 30-49: a horse that commits two or more major faults, including front knockdowns and refusals, or jumps, maneuvers or obstacles in a manner that otherwise endangers the horse and/or rider.
(G) 10-29: a horse that avoids elimination but jumps in such an unsafe and dangerous manner as to preclude a higher score.
(e) Elimination:
(1) A total of three disobediences that can include any of the following: refusal, stop, run out or extra circle.
(2) Jumping an obstacle before it is reset.
(3) Bolting from the arena.
(4) Off course.
(5) Deliberately addressing an obstacle.
(6) Failure to trot the horse in a small circle on a loose rein for soundness, after jumping the last fence, while still mounted and prior to leaving the arena.

RULE 41: Hunter Hack

(a) The hunter hack horse should move in the same style as a working hunter or hunter under saddle. The class will be judged on style over fences, even hunting pace, flat work, manners and way of going. The poll should be level with, or slightly above the withers, to allow proper impulsion behind. The head should not be carried behind the vertical, giving the appearance of intimidation, or be excessively nosed out, giving a resistant appearance.

(b) Horses are first required to jump two fences, two feet three inches (68.5 cm) to three feet (90 cm). However, if the jumps are set on a line they are recommended to be in increments of 12 feet (3.5 meters) but adjusted to no less than two strides. A ground line is recommended for each jump.

(c) Horses being considered for an award are then to be shown at a walk, trot and canter both ways of the ring with light contact.

(d) At the discretion of the judge, contestants may be asked to hand gallop, pull up or back and stand quietly following the last fence.

(e) When necessary to split large classes by running more than one go-round, finalists must both be rejumped and reworked on the flat.

(f)Placing for the class shall be determined by allowing a minimum of 70 percent for individual fence work and a maximum of 30 percent for work on the flat.
Faults (to be scored accordingly, but not necessarily cause disqualification during the rail work) include:
(1)Being on wrong lead and/or wrong diagonal at the trot
(2)Excessive speed (any gait)
(3)Excessive slowness (any gait)
(4)Breaking gait
(5)Failure to take gait when called
(6)Head carried too low or too high
(7)Nosing out or flexing behind the vertical
(8)Opening mouth excessively
(9)Stumbling

(g)Faults, which will be cause for disqualification:
(1)Head carried too low (such that the poll is below the withers
(2)Over-flexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical

RULE 42: HUNTER OVER FENCES

(1)Minimum of four obstacles. Horses to jump a minimum of eight fences. One change of direction is mandatory.

(2)Obstacles which may be used:
    (A)Fences shall simulate obstacles found in the hunting field, such as natural looking post and rail, brush, walls, coops and ascending oxers (not square). Triple bar and hogsback are prohibited.Striped poles are not recommended; PVC poles used as rails are not permitted.
    (B)The top element of all fences must be securely placed so that a slight rub will not cause a knockdown
    (C)Distance between fences is recommended to be in 12-foot (3.5 meters) increments with the exception of some combinations: one stride in and out, 24-26 feet (7 meters); two strides in and out, 36 feet (11 meters); three strides, 48 feet (14.5 meters)
    (D)Minimum height for junior horses, youth and amateur classes must be three feet (90 cm), with a maximum of three feet three inches (1 meter); heights for senior horses must be a minimum of three feet three inches (1 meter), with a maximum of three feet six inches (1.07 meters), and all-ages must be a minimum of three feet (90 cm) with a maximum of three feet six inches (110 cm). Minimum height for novice and select will be two feet six inches (79 cm)with a maximum of two feet nine inches.
    (E)A variation of three inches (75 mm) in fence height, lower than official heights listed, may be instituted if show management and the judge feel circumstances warrant, i.e., footing, weather, etc.
    (F)The use of wings on obstacles in hunter classes is recommended; standards made of PVC material must be anchored or properly secured.
    (G)Jump standards with hole heights at three inch (75 mm) intervals with jump cups are recommended.
   (d)Scoring:       (1)To be judged on manners, way of going and style of jumping. Horses shall be credited with maintaining an even hunting pace that covers the course with free-flowing strides. Preference will be given to horses with correct jumping style that meet fences squarely, jumping at the center of fence. Judges shall penalize unsafe jumping and bad form over fence, whether touched or untouched, including twisting. Incorrect leads around the ends of the course or cross-cantering shall be penalized, as well as excessive use of crop. In and outs (one or two strides) shall be taken in the correct number of strides or be penalized. Any error which endangers the horse and/or its rider, particularly refusals or knockdowns, shall be heavily penalized.
       (2) Scoring shall be on a basis of 0-100, with an approximate breakdown as follows:
        (A)90-100: an excellent performer and good mover that jumps the entire course with cadence, balance and style.
        (B)80-89: a good performer that jumps all fences reasonably well; an excellent performer that commits one or two minor faults.
        (C)70-79: the average, fair mover that makes no serious faults, but lacks the style, cadence and good balance of the scopier horses; the good performer that makes a few minor faults.
        (D)60-69: poor movers that make minor mistakes; fair or average movers that have one or two poor fences but no major faults or disobediences.
        (E)50-59: a horse that commits one major fault, such as a hind knockdown, refusal, trot, cross canter or drops a leg.
        (F)30-49: a horse that commits two or more major faults, including front knockdowns and refusals, or jumps in a manner that otherwise endangers the horse and/or rider.
        (G)10-29: a horse that avoids elimination but jumps in such an unsafe and dangerous manner as to preclude a higher score.

(e)Elimination:

(1)A total of three disobediences that can include any of the following: refusal, stop, run out or extra circle.

(2)Jumping an obstacle before it is reset.

(3)Bolting from the arena.

(4)Off course.

(5)Deliberately addressing an obstacle.

(6)Failure to trot the horse in a small circle on a loose rein for soundness, after jumping the last fence, while still mounted and prior to leaving the arena.

(f)General:

(1)Circling once upon entering the ring is permissible.

RULE 43: HUNTER PACE

A hunter pace is a form of competition involving horses and riders. In a hunter pace a trail is marked for horse and rider to follow. On the day of the competition, early in the morning, the hosts of the event send an experienced horse and rider to ride the trail as fast as it is safely possible to do so. This morning ride is called "the dead body run", and it establishes two things:

1. That the trail is clear and safe for the competitors
2. The pace time is the ideal time to safely but quickly ride the set trail. When the competitors arrive they send out teams of three or four to ride the trail. Checkpoints set along the ride ensure that the riders are staying on course and are not overworking their horses. Each group of riders is timed. Riders are penalized for either riding too fast and beating the pace time, or too slow and taking longer than the pace time. The group to come closest to the pace time wins the competition, whether over or under the "pace" time.

Attire and Tack is hunt seat but more relaxed and laid back.

RULE 44: SHOW HACK

The show hack is a type of ridden show horse, exhibited to a standard first established in England.
Affiliated showing and breeding of the show hacks in the United Kingdom is overseen by the British Show Horse Association.

In the USA and Canada, show hack is solely a form of competition open to various breeds and overseen by the USEF and Equine Canada (EC). The Canadian form of competition is more closely modeled on the British standard than that of the USA.

The show hack is designed for horse's with exception training. Arabian, Half-Arabian and National Show horses divisions offer Show Hack Classes. Open show Hack Classes are seen in some areas, particularly Canada where the class has a far longer history than in U.S.A. The class is judged on manners, performance, quality and conformation. The Show Hack is neither a Dressage Class nor an English Pleasure Class. The horse should be Arabian, Half-Arabian or NSH of good quality and elegant appearance. Other breeds should specify their class and the division as being held in an Open Horse Show. The gaits called for are: normal, collected, and extended walk, normal, collected and extended trot, normal, collected and extended canter, and hand-gallop. The horse and rider may be asked to halt and rein back on the rail. The horse's frame should compare to a mid to upper level dressage horse, it should be neither as low as a Western or first-level horse nor as high and tight as an English Pleasure or Park Horse. Action will vary but it will not approach English Pleasure style, high action is either desired nor penalized. In general it is the equivalent of desired hunter pleasure action or slightly higher as the show hack horse must demostrate impulsion in the collected gaits.

Hacks in the UK must have straight movement and move with "pointed" toes. Individual shows do not need to show a gallop, but should show rein back alongside the usual requirements of halt, walk, trot and canter.

In North American classes, the show hack is to show at extended, regular and collected versions of the walk, trot and canter, as well as performing a hand gallop, halt and the rein back. Particular emphasis is placed on gait transitions and obedience. While fluid, smooth gaits are always desired, a more dressage-like frame is favored. Some show hack classes for specific breeds, particularly those for the Arabian and Morgan, encourage some animated knee action, though in Canada, use of weighted shoes is prohibited.

In Canada, riders may be asked to dismount and remount their horses, and horses may have their saddles removed for conformation judging. Conformation scores may be used to break a tie.

Worldwide, manners are particularly important in the judging of hacks, and any animal behaving badly will be severely penalized in the judging.

You Score Show Hack on the following basis:

Faults to be scored according to severity:
(1)Quick, short or vertical strides
(2)Being on the wrong lead
(3)Breaking gait
(4)Excessive speed at any gait
(5)Excessive slowness in any gait, loss of forward momentum
(6)Failure to take the appropriate gait when called for
(7)Head carried too high
(8)Head carried too low (such that poll is below the withers)
(9)Overflexing or straining neck in head carriage so the nose is carried behind the vertical
(10)Excessive nosing out
(11)Failure to maintain light contact with horse’s mouth
(12)Stumbling
(13)If a horse appears sullen, dull, lethargic, emaciated, drawn or overly tired
(14)Consistently showing too far off the rail

RULE 45: SHOW OR STADIUM JUMPING

Arena Arrangement:
(1)There ia a minimum of four obstacles; horses are to make a minimum of eight jumps.
(2)A spread fence consisting of two or more elements will be mandatory.
(3)It is recommended the first obstacle be no more than minimum height.
(4)Optional obstacles may include:
  (A)Post and Rail (at least two)
  (B)Chicken Coop
  (C)Stone Wall
  (D)Triple Bar
  (E)Brush Jump
  (5)Both a starting line at least 12 feet (3.6 meters ) in front of the first obstacle, and a finish line at least 24 feet (7.3 meters) beyond the last obstacle must be indicated by markers (at least 12 feet (3.6 meters) apart) at each end of the lines. Horse must start and finish by passing between markers.
  (6)Obstacles, except within combinations, should be located a minimum distance of 48 feet (14.6 meters) apart, size of arena permitting.
  (7)Height of obstacles must be a minimum of three feet six inches and a maximum of four feet (122 cm) in first go-round, except in youth and amateur which is a minimum of three feet three inches (99 cm) and a maximum of three feet six inches (105 cm).

(c)Time shall begin from the instant the horse’s chest reaches the starting line until it reaches the finish line. Time shall be stopped while a knocked down jump is being replaced, this is from the moment the rider gets his mount in a position to retake the jump until the proper authority signals that the jump has been replaced. It shall be the rider’s responsibility to be ready to continue the course when the signal is given.

(d)Scoring: jumpers are scored on a mathematical basis and penalty faults which include knockdowns, disobediences and faults.

(1)Knockdown: An obstacle is considered knocked down and four faults assessed, when a horse or rider, by contact:
  (A) Lowers any part thereof which establishes the height of the obstacle or the height of any element of a spread obstacle even when the falling part is arrested in its fall by any portion of the obstacle
  (B)Moves any part thereof which establishes the height of the obstacle so it rests on a different support from the one on which it was originally placed
   (C)Knocks down an obstacle, standard wing, automatic timing equipment or other designated markers on start and finish lines.
  (D)If an obstacle falls after the horse leaves the ring, it shall not be considered a knockdown.

(2)Disobediences:
  (A)Refusal: When a horse stops in front of an obstacle (whether or not the obstacle is knocked down or altered) it is a refusal unless the horse then immediately jumps the obstacle without backing one step. If horse takes one step backwards, it is a refusal.
  (B)Run-out: A run-out occurs when the horse evades or passes the obstacle to be jumped; jumps an obstacle outside its limiting markers; or when the horse or rider knocks down a flag, standard, wing or other element limiting the obstacle (without obstacle being jumped).
   (C)Loss of forward movement: Failure to maintain trot, canter or gallop after crossing starting line, except when it is a refusal, a run-out or when due to uncontrollable circumstances, such as when an obstacle is being reset.
  (D)Unnecessary circling on course: Any form of circle or circles, whereby the horse crosses its original track between two consecutive obstacles anywhere on course, except to retake obstacle after refusal or run-out.

RULE 46: OTHER ENGLISH EVENT

Is a model horse class designed as a catch all for any type of class that fits the premium requirement but is not previously listed. Premium requirement would be a of an English bridle and/or English saddle of some type.

RULE 47: ENGLISH BARREL RACING

This is a hobby show class based on all the rules and pattern for Western Barrel Racing only using Hunt Seat Tack.

RULE 48: ENGLISH GYMKHANA GAMES

See RULE 28 for a list of games as ridden in Western.

English gymkhana rides the same list but under English tack. Tricky part about these games are that English horses are ridden with both hands. So if you use a doll rider you must set up your entry to use them performing the task part of the game with enough realism as to being able to get that second hand back on the rein after the task is completed.

A)English Games Speed - Timed Game

IMEHA Definition of a Speed or Timed Event is when the horse and rider are competing against a clock and are the only entry in the arena during their performance. Or may be a pair of riders racing against each other in heats with fastest rider advancing to a final heat. Many of the Mounted Games that are popular today are done with Teams. Of course, each member of the team goes at a time, (so only one would appear in the setup) but it is when the entire team completes the event that the team is then timed, fastest team wins. B)B)English Games - Non Timed Event

IMEHA Definition of a Non Timed Event is as follows:
Some Non-speed games are won by having the most items in a bucket, or by scoring the most goals, or (if egg and spoon or dollar) by being the last to have an egg in their spoon or dollar under their thigh, etc. There are many NON-SPEED/NON-TIMED type games that do not involve crossing a finish line Speed is not involved. Most of these games are about finesse.

RULE 49: DRESSAGE

See IMEHA Dressage:
http://www.imeha.org/imehaguidebook/Dressage/dressageclasses.html

This event is done on four levels (five at Grand Prix) and is to display the ability of horse and rider in balance. The horse learns flexion, balance, lightness, ease of movement, freedom and regularity of paces, lightness of forehand, engagement of hind quarters, lively impulsion and acceptance of the bit. The horse moves in a straight line when asked, bends with suppleness when performing curved lines. In all work the horse is on the bit and the carriage of his head and neck is determined by level of training, the relative collection of the gait performed and the horse's conformation of the breed. The head is usually slightly ahead of the vertical with the supple poll the highest point of the neck. Once in a while a horse will for a moment slightly behind the vertical and will still be engaged. At training level, the horse should be performing with the hind legs and the front legs however, having the hind end higher than the front is a severe fault.

Tests:
USEF, USDF, and FEI tests are acceptable. Tests begin with a Training Level and progress through Fourth level and are designed to show the horse's ability to perform with increasing suppleness, implusion, straightness and balance. Fifth Level tests are done at International FEI.

The dressage arena is usually 60 x 20 meters and marked :

Judge

C

H     G     M

S     I     R

E     X     B

V     L     P

K     D     F

A

(Entry to Arena)

Tack required:
English saddle with stirrups and saddle pads (either shaped or squared). Style of saddle may vary with level performed. A dressage saddle should be used above Second Level. For Training up until Fourth Level a plain snaffle bridle with leather noseband may be used (cavesson, dropped, flash or crossed noseband) that can be padded. Fourth and Fifth Levels may use the same equipment or substitute a simple double bridle with bridoon and curb with curb chain. FEI Tests require a double bridle for all tests. Leg bandages are allowed in Pax de Delux and Quadrille only. Breastplate and crupper are permissible. Sidesaddle riding is allowed but shows in the Sidesaddle Division and not in the Dressage Division. P rohibited tack is as follows: Martingales, tie downs, bit guards, side reins, running reins, any kind of boots or bandages except in previous mention tests, tail bandages, blinkers, ear muffs, nose covers, seat covers, hoods. Decorations in the tail such as flowers or ribbons are prohibited. Pelham bits are never allowed. For model horse a pelham is described by NAMSHA as: A bit with two reins but only one headstall, attached to the curb portion.

Turnout of Horse:
Braided manes and tails are permitted. Tails are left long, they can be banged or pulled too. Unbraided manes are short and pulled. Braids may be of any style, sewn or wrapped with white tape. Braided tails are uncommon in the USA. Military uniforms and tack is acceptable for qualifying rider. Black tack is currently fashionable. Saddle pads are usually square and white, sometimes black trim or piping is seen. Dressage rider tend to show in black and white.

Turnout of Rider:
Training to Fourth Level riders wear short riding coats of conservative color, with tie, choker, or stock tie, fawn or creme colored breeches or jodhpurs, boots or jodhpur boots, hunt cap or hard shell riding hat, derby or top hat, dark or light colored gloves. Tests Fourth or Fifth level require a dark tailcoat (shadbelly) with a top hat (men may also wear a short coat with a bowler hat) white beeches, hunting stock. white gloves and black riding boots. Smooth spurs are mandatory for FEI tests and optional at Fifth Level. I am confused on the status of carrying a whip. In Combine Training Article 1711 RULE 2 says no whips allowed except in sidesaddle and during the warmup. In Dressage Division Article 1920 RULE 4 says a whip no longer than 4' including the lash may be carried in all classes except USEF/USDF Championships, USET Championships, USET qualifying and selection trails and in all international (FEI level) competition.

Required:
A description of either USEF, USDF or FEI sanctioned Level, Test and Movement should be presented along with the entry. If a musical freestyle or kur then the Name of the Music should be included. A portion of the dressage fence with a letter marker for the appropriate letter (s) required to recreate the movement.

Extra Credit:
Given for a copy of the entire test with the specific movement lightened. Make sure a horse saluting the judge a X is facing the judge HEAD-ON. A standing horse with a turned head is always at fault. Be sure the horse is performing the movement stated. Look for a number (black number on white background and cut in a circle or oval) is placed on the browband or pinned to the saddle pad. The number may be on either side.

RULE 50: SADDLESEAT

http://www.imeha.org/imehaguidebook/SS/saddleseat.html

RULE 51: SIDESADDLE

http://www.imeha.org/imehaguidebook/SS/sidesaddle.html

RULE 52: COSTUME

http://www.imeha.org/imehaguidebook/Costume/costume.html

RULE 53: HARNESS

http://www.imeha.org/imehaguidebook/harness/harness.html

http://www.imeha.org/HarnessGuidebookNT.html

RULE 54: MISCELLANEOUS TRAIL EVENTS

http://www.imeha.org/imehaguidebook/MiscTrail/misctrail.htm

RULE 55: MISCELLANEOUS PERFORMANCE EVENTS

http://www.imeha.org/imehaguidebook/MiscP/miscellanousperformance.html

RULE 56: SHOWMANSHIP PRESENTATION

There are two types of showmanship/presentation classes one with a doll handler required and one with no doll handler.

Showmanship requires a doll handler. The doll handler is judge on the handler and the horse for a combined score. The ideal showmanship performance consists of a doll that gives a recreation of a poised, confident, neatly attired exhibitor leading a well groomed and conditioned horse that quickly and efficiently performs any requested pattern with promptness, smoothness and precision. The showmanship class is not another halter class and should not be judged as such.

CLASS PROCEDURES:
All exhibitors may enter the ring and then work individually or each exhibitor may be worked from the gate individually. When exhibitors are worked individually from the gate, a working order is required. The following maneuvers are considered acceptable: lead the horse at a walk, jog, trot or extended trot, or back in a straight or curved line, or a combination of straight and curved lines; stop; and turn 90 (1/4), 180 (1/2), 270 (3/4), 360 (full turn) degrees or any combination or multiple of these turns. The judge must have exhibitors set the horse up squarely for inspection sometime during the class.

SCORING:
Exhibitors are to be scored from 0 to 20 with 1/2 point increments acceptable. Ten points should be allocated toward the overall appearance of exhibitor and horse and 10 points allocated toward performance.
(1) OVERALL PRESENTATION OF EXHIBITOR AND HORSE (10 POINTS)
The exhibitor’s overall poise, confidence, appearance and position throughout the class, and the physical appearance of the horse will be evaluated.

(A) Presentation and Position of Exhibitor
• appropriate attire must be worn. Clothes and person are to be neat and clean. The use of any type of artificial aid including, but not limited to lighters, hay, dirt, sharp pins, etc. will be considered a disqualification.

• doll should give off a look of that is poised, confident, courteous and genuinely sportsmanlike at all times, quickly recognizing and correcting faults in the positioning of the horse. The exhibitor should continue showing the horse until the class has been placed. The exhibitor should appear business-like, stand and move in a straight, natural and upright manner, and avoid excessive, unnatural or animated body positions.

• the handler must lead on the horse’s left side holding the lead shank in the right hand near the halter with the tail of the lead loosely coiled in the left hand unless requested by the judge to show the horse’s teeth. It is preferable that the exhibitor’s hand not be on the snap or chain portion of the lead continuously. The excess lead should never be tightly coiled, rolled or folded. When leading, the exhibitor should be positioned between the eye and the mid-point of the horse’s neck, referred to as the leading position.

• both arms should be bent at the elbow with the elbows held close to the exhibitors side and the forearms held in a natural position. Height of the arms may vary depending on the size of the horse and exhibitor, but the arms should never be held straight out with the elbows locked.

• the position of the exhibitor when executing a turn to the right is the same as the leading position except that the exhibitor should turn and face toward the horse’s head and have the horse move away from them to the right.

• when executing a back, the exhibitor should turn from the leading position to face toward the rear of the horse with the right hand extended across the exhibitor’s chest and walk forward beside the horse with the horse moving backward.

• when setting the horse up for inspection, the exhibitor should stand angled toward the horse in a position between the horse’s eye and muzzle, and should never leave the head of the horse. It is recommended, but not mandatory that exhibitors use the “Quarter Method” when presenting the horse. The exhibitor should maintain a position that is safe for themselves and the judge. The position of the exhibitor should not obstruct the judge’s view of the horse and should allow the exhibitor to maintain awareness of the judge’s position at all times. The exhibitor should not crowd other exhibitors when setting up side-by-side or head-to-tail. When moving around the horse, the exhibitor should change sides in front of the horse with minimal steps and should assume the same position on the right side of the horse that they had on the left side.

• leading, backing, turning and initiating the set-up should be performed from the left side of the horse. At no time should the exhibitor ever stand directly in front of the horse. The exhibitor should not touch the horse with their hands or feet, or visibly cue the horse by pointing their feet at the horse during the set-up.

(B)Presentation of Horse
• the horse’s body condition and overall fitness should be assessed. The mane, tail, forelock and wither tuft may not contain ornaments (ribbons, bows, etc.), but may be braided or banded for English or Western. The length of mane and tail may vary, as long as they are neat, clean and free of tangles. The mane should be even in length or may be roached, but the forelock and tuft over the withers must be left. The bridle path, eyebrows, and long hair on the head and legs may be clipped, except where government regulations prohibit.

• hooves should be properly trimmed and if shod, the shoes should fit correctly and clinches should be neat. Hooves must be clean and may be painted black or clear hoof dressings, or shown naturally depending upon breed standard.

• tack should fit properly and be neat, clean and in good repair.

(2)PERFORMANCE (10 POINTS)
• the exhibitor should perform the work accurately, precisely, smoothly, and with a reasonable amount of speed. Increasing speed of the work increases the degree of difficulty, however, accuracy and precision should not be sacrificed for speed. The horse should lead, stop, back, turn and set up willingly, briskly and readily with minimal visible or audible cueing. A severe disobedience will not result in a disqualification but should be penalized severely, and the exhibitor should not place above an exhibitor that completes the pattern correctly. Excessive schooling or training, willful abuse, loss of control of the horse by the exhibitor, failure to follow prescribed pattern, knocking over or working on the wrong side of the cones shall be cause for disqualification.

• the horse should be led directly to and away from the judge in a straight or curved line and track briskly and freely at the prescribed gait as instructed. The horse’s head and neck should be straight and in line with the body.

• the stop should be straight, prompt, smooth and responsive with the horse’s body remaining straight.

• the horse should back up readily with the head, neck and body aligned in a straight or curved line as instructed.

• pull turns to the left should be 90 degrees or less. On turns of greater than 90 degrees, the ideal turn consists of the horse pivoting on the right hind leg while stepping across and in front of the right front leg with the left front leg. An exhibitor should not be penalized if their horse performs a pivot on the left hind leg, but an exhibitor whose horse performs the pivot correctly should receive more credit.

• the horse should be set up quickly with the feet squarely underneath the body. The exhibitor does not have to reset a horse that stops square.

(3)FAULTS:

Faults can be classified as minor, major or severe. The judge will determine the appropriate classification of a fault based upon the degree and/or frequency of the infraction. A minor fault will result in a 1/2 to 4 point deduction from the exhibitor’s score. A major fault will result in a deduction of 4 1/2 points or more from the exhibitor’s score. An exhibitor that incurs a severe fault avoids elimination but should be placed below all other exhibitors that complete the pattern correctly. A minor fault can become a major fault and a major fault can become a severe fault when the degree and/or frequency of the infraction(s) merits.

(A) Faults in the Overall Presentation of Exhibitor and Horse include:
• poorly groomed, conditioned or trimmed horse
• dirty, ragged, or poorly or ill-fitted halter or lead
• poor or improper position of exhibitor
• excessively stiff, artificial, or unnatural movement around horse or when leading • holding of the chain portion of the lead
• lead shank tightly coiled around hand or dragging the ground

Faults of the Performance include:
• drifting of horse while being lead
• horse stopping crooked or dropping a hip out when stopping, setting up or standing
• backing, leading, or turning sluggishly or crooked
• horse not set up squarely or excessive time required to set up
• failure to maintain a pivot foot during turns or stepping behind right front leg with left front leg when turning to the right
• horse holding head and/or neck crooked when leading, stopping or backing
• failure to perform maneuvers at designated markers, but horse is on pattern

(B) Severe Faults of the Overall Presentation of Exhibitor and Horse (avoids disqualification but should be placed below other exhibitors that do not incur a severe fault) include:
• complete failure to move around horse by exhibitor and obstructing judge’s view
• exhibitor touching the horse or kicking or pointing their feet at the horse’s feet during set up
• standing directly in front of the horse
• exhibitor wearing spurs or chaps

Severe Faults of the Performance (avoids disqualification but should be placed below other exhibitors that do not incur a severe fault) include:
• severe disobedience including rearing, pawing; kicking, or circling

(C)Disqualifications (should not be placed) include: • leading on the off or right side of the horse
• loss of control of horse
• failure of exhibitor to wear correct number in a visible manner
• excessive schooling or training, or use of artificial aids
• knocking over the cone or going off pattern

Presentation without Doll Handler: Is judged on the horse and on the tack or headstall used. The halter or headstall is judged as 50% of the class premium and the horse's conformation, breed type and gender plus photo quality make up the other 50%. If you choose to show in these classes be sure that your halter or headstall and lead or reins are sticky waxed off against the horse's shoulder not thrown over the horse's back or held out in front of the hprse. Exception would be for standing Arabian horses in Show arena headstall. It is suggested that you turn your non handler showmanship horse facing toward the right so that the rein or lead is waxed over on the left side which would be where the handler would be standing or leading the horse, if the handler was there. That way you can hide the end of the lead or rein on the off side of the camera lens.

Additional information here:
http://www.imeha.org/imehaguidebook/Showmanship/showmanship.html

RULE 57: HEADSTUDY

This class is to show off your model's photogenic qualities of the head, throat latch and neck. The desired photo should show a close up of the horse's head and neck and "not" extend into the horse's shoulder. The top of withers should not be visable, nor the topline of the back or any part of the horse's chest. The eye should be clearly visionable with no shadow cast upon it or the horse's face.

IMEHA has a very strict rule for headstudy class:
Headstudy classes are open to subject with or without headstall or bridle. Subject shall show head, throat latch and neck only. No chest, shoulder, topline or other body parts shall show within the photo frame. The neck shall stop at the top and bottom of base of the neck and no shoulder muscling or wither hair shall be visible. This ruling is strictly enforced and your entry will not be approved by the Ring Steward if it does not comply.

If after two shows the entry is still listed as "Not Approved" the entry will be removed by show management without consent of the entrant.


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This site is maintained by IMEHA. Its contents are copyrighted ©IMEHA, 2000

Written: June 1, 2001
First Revision: Sept 30, 2005
Second Revision: Sept 28, 2008
Third Revision: Sept 15, 2010
Fourth Revision: Sept 10, 2011
Fifth Revision: Sept 30, 2012
Sixth Revision: Sept 12, 2013
Seventh Revision: Oct 30, 2014
Updated: September 8, 2016